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Sweeping reform of ‘unfair’ leasehold system to go ahead, says Minister

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first_imgHome » News » Sweeping reform of ‘unfair’ leasehold system to go ahead, says Minister previous nextRegulation & LawSweeping reform of ‘unfair’ leasehold system to go ahead, says MinisterFollowing a five month consultation, public enthusiasm for leasehold reform has persuade Communities minister Sajid Javid to act.Nigel Lewis21st December 201701,992 Views A promised leasehold reform programme is to go ahead following a consultation process that launched in July.Communities minister Sajid Javid’s new measures to tackle unfair and abusive practices within the leasehold system will see almost all leaseholds banned for new-build houses – except when a property is in shared ownership – and that ground rents for new leases will have to be at zero for both apartments and houses.Sajid (pictured, below) has also revealed that he is to make it much cheaper and easier for the UK’s 1.4 million leaseholders to buy-out their freehold.“It’s unacceptable for home buyers to be exploited through unnecessary leaseholds, unjustifiable charges and onerous ground rent terms,” the minister says.“It’s clear from the overwhelming response from the public that real action is needed to end these feudal practices.“That’s why the measures this government is now putting in place will help create a system that actually works for consumers.”Also, Sajid’s department is to work with the Law Commission to help leaseholders win redress for existing onerous terms and conditions within their leaseholder – which will hearten the many vendors and agents trying to sell properties crippled by such clauses.Grant Lipton (pictured,right), co-founder at Great Marlborough Estates, says: “The new measures to cut out unfair and abusive practices within the leasehold system are long overdue.“Leaseholds have their place in the market, but what doesn’t have a place is duping people and ripping them off. The proposed changes will curb landlords pushing tenants into unfair ground rents.“Ultimately what we need is more transparency at every stage of the house buying process, where consumers are fully aware of their rights and their advisers fulfil their responsibilities.”grant lipton Great Marlborough Estates Leasehold Reform Sajid Javid December 21, 2017Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

US Navy Cargo Handling Battalion 1 Sailors Train for Deep Freeze

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US Navy Cargo Handling Battalion 1 Sailors Train for Deep Freeze Training & Education Active and Reserve component Sailors assigned to Navy Cargo Handling Battalion 1 (NCHB 1) participated in a three-day refresher training at Naval Weapons Station, Cheatham Annex Jan. 6-8 in preparation for support of Operation Deep Freeze 2016 (ODF’16).Fifty Sailors assigned to NCHB 1 and four reserve component Sailors from Navy Cargo Handling Battalion 8(NCHB 8) used Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group’s (NAVESLG) land ship to become a more cohesive unit – critical while moving cargo in the austere environment they will find themselves in during support of the National Science Foundation-managed U.S. Antarctic Program.The Sailors will deploy as part of ODF’16, the military logistical-support component of the Antarctic Program.“Communication is a big part of pre-deployment training,” said Lt. David Shayeson, detachment officer in charge. “This is a good time for us to exercise that, get it trained up to now versus figuring it out when we get down there.”ODF is unlike any other U.S. military operation. It is one of the military’s most difficult peacetime missions due to the harsh Antarctic environment. The U.S. military is uniquely equipped and trained to operate in such extreme climates. Although Virginia winters never compare to working in Antarctica, conducting pre-deployment training in January does help some.Chief Equipment Operator Samuel Acosta is making his fifth trip in support of ODF, sharing his insight on the difference in cold weather work in Virginia versus Antarctica.“It brings kind of a realism to it but it doesn’t prepare us 100 percent for it, it just helps us to understand what it feels like to work in the cold, it’s what the cargo handlers do, we just adapt and overcome it,” said Acosta.Once on station, the Navy cargo handlers will meet the Military Sealift Command (MSC)-chartered container ship MV Ocean Giant to offload approximately 20 million pounds of fresh supplies to support the scientists and researchers living year-round in the brutal environment. The cargo handlers worked around the clock for 10 days in the continuous sunlight of the Antarctic summer.Reserve Sailors have been a rich part of the U.S. Navy history, working and sacrificing alongside their active-duty counterparts accomplishing missions around the globe in varying conditions and climates. While this mission may not have all the comforts of home, Sailors both active and reserve jump at the chance to work 12-hour shifts in the harshest living conditions.For Navy Cargo Handling Battalion 10 (NCHB 10) reserve component Sailor Equipment Operator 3rd Class Robert Newton and NCHB 8 reserve component Sailor Gunner’s Mate 1st Class Daniel O’Pella, this will be their first time on the ice.“It seemed interesting, an opportunity. I don’t know too many people that can say they have been to Antarctica,” said Newton. O’Pella added “this type of mission is one of the things that attracted me to the cargo community, when I heard that opportunities like this existed I was very excited to be a part of it.”Upon completion of refresher training NCHB 1 and 8 Sailors will begin to make their final preparations for departure to Antarctica in support of the 61st mission of Operation Deep Freeze.NAVELSG is homeported in Williamsburg, Va., with an active battalion located at Cheatham Annex; with forward-deployed detachments around the world and reserve battalions located across the United States. NAVELSG provides Sailors with the knowledge and skills needed to support the fleet in a variety of logistics missions. More than 100 Sailors and civilians at NAVELSG HQ work hand in hand with the fleet and are dedicated to ensuring training is current and well executed on behalf of 2,700 active duty and reserve Sailors in the administration, logistics and training of their active and reserve components’. Share this article Back to overview,Home naval-today US Navy Cargo Handling Battalion 1 Sailors Train for Deep Freeze View post tag: US Navy January 12, 2016 read more

Physical Science – Adjunct

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first_imgQualifications * Are you a Christian?YesNo Qualified applicants will possess at least a master’s degree in arelated field. Candidates must embrace the mission of CaliforniaBaptist University, and demonstrate a clear understanding of, andcommitment to, excellence in teaching through the integration ofChristian faith and learning. The Department of Chemical Sciences at California BaptistUniversity invites applications for part-time, adjunct instructorpositions in physical science. Review of applications is conductedin an ongoing manner according to need. Teaching assignments will be lower level undergraduatecourses. Position TitlePhysical Science – Adjunct Quick Link to Postinghttps://jobs.calbaptist.edu/postings/6066 Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*). Applicant DocumentsRequired DocumentsChristian Experience EssayCurriculum VitaeOptional DocumentsResumeCover LetterLetter of Reference 1Letter of Reference 2Unofficial Transcriptcenter_img Posting Details Nondiscrimination Statement Position Summary * Do you attend church regularly?YesNo State and Federal law permit California Baptist University todiscriminate on the basis of religion in order to fulfill itspurpose. The University does not discriminate contrary to eitherState or Federal law. If no, please explain (required):(Open Ended Question)* Are you both familiar with and not in conflict with thefundamental doctrines and practices of the California SouthernBaptist Convention as stated in the Baptist Faith and Message datedJune 14, 2000? (Please see above link for more information)Yes (I am familiar and not in conflict)No (I am in conflict or not familiar) Teaching Responsibilitieslast_img read more

Ocean City Commits to $80 Million in Road, Beach, Boardwalk, Bay Projects

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first_imgA boardwalk reconstruction project between Fifth and 12th streets includes a complete demolition and replacement of the substructure.City Council voted unanimously Thursday on a plan to spend about $80 million catch up on long-neglected improvements to roads, public facilities, beaches, the boardwalk and the bay in Ocean City.Council approved a five-year capital plan in which Mayor Jay Gillian’s administration proposes spending $79.4 million.Some highlights include:Roads and drainage: It dedicates about $29.3 million to road and drainage improvements — including about $7.9 million for 2015.Boardwalk: The plan anticipates spending $3.85 million per year to finish a project to replace the substructure and decking of the Ocean City Boardwalk: Plaza Place to Eighth Street (2015-16), Eighth Street to somewhere past the Ocean City Music Pier (2016-17), Music Pier to somewhere past 10th Street (2017-18), and to the finish at 12th Street (2018-19). The plan calls for the construction of boardwalk pavilions (like at 11th Street) for the area between Fifth and 10th streets.Beach: The plan anticipates regularly scheduled federal beach replenishment projects for the north end of Ocean City in spring 2016 and for the south end in 2018.Bay: The plan dedicates $5 million in 2015 and $10 million over five years to dredge lagoons and channels on the bay side of Ocean City that are too shallow at many points in the tide cycle to allow boat traffic. The city will spend $2.7 million to make room at a spoils site to complete an unfinished job between 15th and 34th streets. The plan also dedicates about $3.9 million ($2.6 million of it from a National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Grant) to use “thin layer disposal” of dredged material to restore wetlands.The plan lists hundreds of other improvements — from Pickleball courts to new record boards at the Aquatics and Fitness Center.__________See presentation on the 2015-2019 capital plan, including recently completed projects, 2015 projects, 2016-2019 projects and debt impact.__________The city is taking advantage of historically low interest rates on its borrowing, according to Finance Director Frank Donato.He said the city will have $10.5 million in debt service payments in 2015, an increase of 6.7 percent. The city has a total of $58.9 million in bonded debt right now.Check for copies and updates on the capital plan at ocnj.us/capital-projects/._____Sign up for free daily news updates from Ocean City._____The spending plan for 2015 through 2019 represents a $27.8 million increase over the five-year plan for 2014 to 2018.In a separate vote on Thursday, City Council approved the first reading of a bond ordinance authorizing the borrowing of $7.9 million for the following capital projects:$3,985,000: For continued phases of a multi-year boardwalk reconstruction project.$1,910,000: For construction and repair of public buildings, including historic Life Saving Station, Ocean City Community Center, 46th Street and West Avenue, Route 52 Welcome Center, Humane Society, Ocean City Municipal Airport and others.$962,000: Improvement of public facilities including tennis courts, basketball courts, ball fields and playgrounds.$750,300: Equipment for Ocean City Music Pier, Ocean City Police Department, Fire Department and Beach Patrol.See more detail in the documentation below. A second reading on the bond ordinance will be held on March 26.Download (PDF, 265KB)last_img read more

Three New Ocean City Officers Graduate in Police Academy Class

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first_imgNew officers who are part of the graduating class of the Cape May County Police Academy receive applause.  Ocean City High School played host recently to graduation exercises for the 46th class of the Cape May County Police Academy. Fifty-eight newly minted police officers representing municipalities and organizations from around the state were awarded certificates, including three from Ocean City.  One Ocean City graduate, Benjamin G. Bethea, made remarks on behalf of the class. The other two Ocean City Police Department recruits are Randall I. Clark and Jonathan C. Simonson.Two graduates represented the Cape May County Sheriff’s Department: Sullivan C. Edwards and Andrew J. Garcia.The exercises were well-attended not only by friends and family members of the graduates, but also by representatives and staff of the Cape May County Police Academy, local police departments and law enforcement agencies statewide. Cape May County Freeholder Vice Director Leonard C. Desiderio, who is also mayor of Sea Isle City, gave a speech to the class and Patrick Colligan, president of the New Jersey State Police Benevolent Association, delivered the keynote address. Awards were presented for academic achievement, firearms proficiency and physical fitness, among other honors.Desiderio administered the oath of office, while Cape May County Prosecutor Jeffrey Sutherland, Wildwood Police Chief Robert Regalbuto and Director of the Public Safety Training Center Thomas DePaul presided over the presentation of certificates to the graduates. DePaul also made the closing remarks.Ocean City Police Department Officer Benjamin Bethea spoke on behalf of the graduating members of the class.last_img read more

United Biscuits highlights manufacturing job appeal

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first_imgUnited Biscuits (UB) has invited students from Parrs Wood High School to go behind-the-scenes at its McVitie’s factory as part of a new government initiative.The year 10 students from the Manchester-based school toured the firm’s site as a result of the See Inside Manufacturing scheme, which aims to get young people interested in careers in manufacturing.Lesley Flood, training co-ordinator at McVitie’s Manchester, said: “We are trying to change students’ views of manufacturing. We want them to see us as a great career opportunity with huge potential.“We have a wide range of entrance levels from unskilled to apprentices, graduates and technical experts. We help and encourage our employees to work their way up the career ladder.”Students toured UB’s factory and observed how its biscuit products, such as Jaffa Cakes, Chocolate Digestives and Penguins, were made. They were also able to meet different people from various roles in the factory to find out more about their jobs and the qualifications needed to do them.In partnership with the Food and Drink Federation (FDF), nearly 1,250 people will be visiting UK food and drink companies to learn more about the sector. Around 137,000 new recruits are needed by 2017 to replace those retiring or leaving the industry.Terry Jones, director of communications, FDF, said: “UB is one of many companies across the UK opening their doors to young people and getting them excited about careers in manufacturing. Food and drink is the UK’s largest manufacturing sector, employing over 400,000 people. It offers great prospects to employees at all levels, from apprentice to seasoned professional, and is an important local employer.“As an industry, we know that to realise our potential and to deliver our shared vision with government of 20% growth by 2020, we will need to attract the best talent.”last_img read more

John Mayer May Play On Jerry Garcia’s ‘Tiger’ Guitar With Dead & Co This Summer

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first_imgIn 2002, Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay made headlines by dropping close to one million dollars for the famed Tiger guitar used by Jerry Garcia from 1979-1989. The guitar had been kept on display in both Indiana museums and Irsay’s office throughout the years, but now it’s getting a new use: Dead & Company.The band, who just kicked off a summer tour with a free show in San Francisco, was contacted by Chris McKinney, who curates Irsay’s rare guitars and collectibles. Irsay sent the Tiger guitar to the Dead & Company rehearsals, though it has not yet been played, according to McKinney. The guitar only arrived yesterday afternoon, and the band had a show to play after all!According to the report in Indy Star, the guitar was sent for Dead & Company guitarist John Mayer to use in rehearsals and on tour. With Dead & Company’s tour heading to the Klipsch Music Center in Noblesville, IN on June 17th, the potential for Tiger’s appearance is at an all time high.“You know, the guitar was made to be played,” Weir said in a press conference back in April. “Even if it someday ends up in a museum, I think half the time it should be trotted out and played, because that’s what it was built to do. I know that Jerry would feel that way.” Weir went on to say that he would like to hang out with Irsay, and commented, “Hopefully he’ll be in town when we come through Indianapolis.”last_img read more

Harvard’s ties to India

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first_imgOver the past several years, Harvard University has been ramping up its involvement in India and South Asia, a trend catalyzed by Harvard’s South Asia Initiative, which was founded in 2003 to foster the University’s engagement in the region. Harvard’s understanding of the region’s importance is highlighted by President Drew Faust’s January visit to India.The region contains a quarter of the world’s population and includes both India’s rising economic power and Pakistan’s strategic importance. Harvard Business School has opened a regional office in Mumbai, where the initiative shares space. The initiative has focused on five key interdisciplinary areas: urbanization, water, social enterprise, health and medicine, and “South Asia without Borders,” an umbrella effort focused on the arts, humanities, and social sciences.India ranks fourth in the number of students it sends to Harvard, with 232 studying here this year. Harvard has about 1,500 alumni in India.last_img read more

A thanks-giving meal

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For most Harvard College students, picking up a book at the library is as routine as getting dressed in the morning or grabbing a cup of coffee.In Durban, South Africa, where Mfundo Radebe ’20 grew up, it was a potentially deadly undertaking.Radebe, a Quincy House resident with concentrations in African Studies and Economics, addressed a crowd of nearly 400 on Friday evening at the annual Celebration of Scholarships dinner, which every year brings together students who benefit from financial aid and donors who support it.Describing an upbringing “forged by an oppressive apartheid regime that believed people like me did not deserve an education” Radebe, a recipient of an Edwin H. Fox ’44 Undergraduate Scholarship, recalled being confronted by thieves after one trip to the library, an hour’s walk from his home.,“I found myself standing still on the treacherous path,” he said. “I surveyed the peripheries wondering how I could escape or tame the knife ahead of me, pointed at me. In that moment, I offered my shoes, hoping that would pacify them and allow me safe passageway.”Radebe lost his shoes, but kept hold of “The Chronicles of Narnia.” It was the beginning of a journey of learning that eventually brought him across the globe to Harvard.Once in Cambridge, in his freshman year Radebe started an organization that provides books for primary school children in South Africa. He hopes it will give others the same sense of possibility he has.“If I can just reach one child with a book and they hold onto that book more than anything else, more than the loss they might have experienced, more than the lack of opportunity they have been afforded, I would have succeeded,” Radebe said.This year’s dinner, the 12th scholarship celebration, was held in the Northwest Science Building and co-hosted by Tim Barakett ’87, M.B.A. ’93, and Michele Barakett; Lloyd C. Blankfein ’75, J.D. ’78, and Laura Blankfein P ’16, ’10, ’08; Ken Griffin ’89; and Jerry Jordan ’61, M.B.A. ’67, and Darlene Jordan.,One of four co-chairs for financial aid, Tim Barakett detailed the success of the campaign, and the generosity of donors.“As of this week, we have reached our campaign goal of $600 million,” he said. “To give you an idea of how generous this community is, just six months ago we were short of our goal. We made an appeal, you responded, and we still have until June 30 to continue to build on our success. I am so grateful for the generosity of everyone in this room.”Co-chair Jerry Jordan said he has seen the event he helped inaugurate in 2007 come full circle.“Today, we are already seeing graduates from that year among our donors and here with us tonight,” he said. “This event represents a truly virtuous cycle.”Kicking off the student portion of the program, recent graduate Shuya Gong spoke about discovering entrepreneurship at Harvard and reflected on her brief experience as a recent graduate.,“My life had been pretty normal when I arrived at Harvard, but I didn’t really know what was next,” she said. “Mechanical engineering exposed me to the concept of creating something out of nothing. That really inspired me and really invigorated me to get up every morning and go to the lab.”She credited her professors with building on the concept of creation to encourage her to pursue entrepreneurship.“Harvard put a lot of pressure on me to grow as a person, to learn things I didn’t know previously, and to step outside my comfort zone,” Gong said. “But it never put pressure on me or my family financially, and because of that I had room to grow and thrive.”Senior Zarin Rahman, a native of South Dakota, receives aid through the Radford D. Lovett Family Scholarship Fund and plans to apply to medical school to become a pediatrician. She thanked the many donors in the room who helped make her education possible.“My love for children and my motivation to work with them has been one of the few constants in my life,” said the Mather House resident, who concentrated in neurobiology. “There is so much to learn from them: creativity, curiosity, positivity, kindness, and the purest forms of joy.“Beyond being affordable for both me and my family, Harvard has opened doors to explore my interests more than I could have imagined in my wildest dreams,” she said. “I look forward to taking these experiences and the knowledge Harvard has armed me with and trying to make the world a better place.”Cape Cod native Matthew Cappucci ’19 has always been interested in weather. So when he found there was no concentration in atmospheric sciences at Harvard, he decided to create one.,“I’m a department of one pursuing my very own special concentration,” he said. “It took months, a 30-page application, six recommendation letters, and more signatures than it would were I to run for president, but I finally got approval to pursue the first-ever atmospheric sciences concentration at Harvard.“Being a department of one has its challenges,” said Cappucci, who received a Gerald Jordan Family Scholarship. “I anticipated the path to be a lonely one. I could not have been more wrong. Harvard has given me everything and I will never be able to repay them for the incredible doors they’ve opened and the gifts they’ve given me. Thank you all for what you have done, and the support you continue to give.”The evening also featured comments from Edgerley Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Michael D. Smith and Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid William R. Fitzsimmons, both of whom extolled the financial aid program as among Harvard’s most important.“I am incredibly grateful to everyone here tonight for the powerful legacy of opportunity that you have helped to build here at Harvard,” Smith said. “As tonight so wonderfully demonstrates, financial aid empowers the next generation. Financial aid frees our students to follow their passions, and it accelerates the development of tomorrow’s leaders.”“Tonight is one of the greatest nights of my life,” Fitzsimmons said. “I believe in equality of opportunity, and if we are any kind of world or society, we need to guarantee equality of opportunity for every generation. This mission and this event defines who we are.”Ken Griffin, who in 2014 made the largest gift to financial aid in College history, agreed that providing opportunity for all is a core value.“People often ask me why I am so committed to financial aid,” he said. “Financial aid speaks to a principle that all of us hold dear as Americans. You cannot be the greatest institution in America if you do not represent the belief in equality of opportunity in your actions.”“The Harvard that we know today was made by financial aid,” said Lloyd Blankfein. “And the gratitude flows in both directions: [to and from] the donors who help worthy students realize their potential, and the worthy students [who allow] Harvard to realize its potential.” read more

‘Agnes of God’ tackles corruption in Church, questions of faith

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first_imgThe Notre Dame Student Players will premiere “Agnes of God,” a play seeking to reconcile faith with trauma, Thursday at 7 p.m. for their spring production in the Lab Theatre in Washington Hall.“Agnes of God” follows the story of Dr. Livingston, a psychiatrist asked to investigate the case of Sr. Agnes, a cloistered nun alleged to have given birth and murdered her newborn.“Dr. Livingston’s task is to determine whether or not Agnes is clinically insane,” said Savanna Morgan, the play’s director.Corinne Wehby, who plays Livingston, said Agnes’ case brings back unwelcome memories for the psychiatrist. Though Livingston grew up Catholic, personal tragedy led her to renounce her faith long ago, Wehby said.“[Livingston] just looks at the Church in a very, very poor light,” she said. “She sees this corruption and wants to protect other people from kind of falling victim to that, like she has in the past.”As she digs deeper into the case, Livingston is forced to confront the very questions of faith she had long left behind, Wehby said.“I think she, for the longest time in her life, has abandoned all ideas of the Church, of her faith,” she said. “For the first time, I think, in years, she has to start addressing these issues of faith again. … It turns into this psychological kind of war over Agnes.”When it comes to portraying darker subjects — including sexual assault — the play strikes a balance between elements of melodrama and realism, Morgan said.“I’ve done everything that I can to ignore … hyperbolizing the trauma,” she said. “When audiences come see the show, they’re able to say, ‘This is something that’s real, and something that the Church needs to confront,’ as opposed to dismissing it as, ‘Oh, this is just a story.’”Wehby said “Agnes of God” does not take sides when it comes to matters of faith, but instead seeks to show how religion — or the lack thereof — can sway individuals’ thoughts and feelings.“There’s some instances where faith is blinding some characters to different truths about the situation,” she said. “But then there’s certainly instances where for my character, her lack of faith is almost blinding her.”Assistant director Patrick Starner said the play does not dwell on its darker themes, but rather on how they work to develop its characters.“It’s more about not even quite the aftermath [of traumas], but just wrestling upon the implications that they have years afterward,” he said.The audience should not expect the play to proclaim a single message or moral, but to leave them wondering, Starner added.“The biggest thing that I hope people take away is just more like a reflection or a questioning of their own lives,” he said.Tags: Agnes of God, Notre Dame Student Players, Theatre, Washington Halllast_img read more