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John Mayer May Play On Jerry Garcia’s ‘Tiger’ Guitar With Dead & Co This Summer

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first_imgIn 2002, Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay made headlines by dropping close to one million dollars for the famed Tiger guitar used by Jerry Garcia from 1979-1989. The guitar had been kept on display in both Indiana museums and Irsay’s office throughout the years, but now it’s getting a new use: Dead & Company.The band, who just kicked off a summer tour with a free show in San Francisco, was contacted by Chris McKinney, who curates Irsay’s rare guitars and collectibles. Irsay sent the Tiger guitar to the Dead & Company rehearsals, though it has not yet been played, according to McKinney. The guitar only arrived yesterday afternoon, and the band had a show to play after all!According to the report in Indy Star, the guitar was sent for Dead & Company guitarist John Mayer to use in rehearsals and on tour. With Dead & Company’s tour heading to the Klipsch Music Center in Noblesville, IN on June 17th, the potential for Tiger’s appearance is at an all time high.“You know, the guitar was made to be played,” Weir said in a press conference back in April. “Even if it someday ends up in a museum, I think half the time it should be trotted out and played, because that’s what it was built to do. I know that Jerry would feel that way.” Weir went on to say that he would like to hang out with Irsay, and commented, “Hopefully he’ll be in town when we come through Indianapolis.”last_img read more

Harvard’s ties to India

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first_imgOver the past several years, Harvard University has been ramping up its involvement in India and South Asia, a trend catalyzed by Harvard’s South Asia Initiative, which was founded in 2003 to foster the University’s engagement in the region. Harvard’s understanding of the region’s importance is highlighted by President Drew Faust’s January visit to India.The region contains a quarter of the world’s population and includes both India’s rising economic power and Pakistan’s strategic importance. Harvard Business School has opened a regional office in Mumbai, where the initiative shares space. The initiative has focused on five key interdisciplinary areas: urbanization, water, social enterprise, health and medicine, and “South Asia without Borders,” an umbrella effort focused on the arts, humanities, and social sciences.India ranks fourth in the number of students it sends to Harvard, with 232 studying here this year. Harvard has about 1,500 alumni in India.last_img read more

A thanks-giving meal

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For most Harvard College students, picking up a book at the library is as routine as getting dressed in the morning or grabbing a cup of coffee.In Durban, South Africa, where Mfundo Radebe ’20 grew up, it was a potentially deadly undertaking.Radebe, a Quincy House resident with concentrations in African Studies and Economics, addressed a crowd of nearly 400 on Friday evening at the annual Celebration of Scholarships dinner, which every year brings together students who benefit from financial aid and donors who support it.Describing an upbringing “forged by an oppressive apartheid regime that believed people like me did not deserve an education” Radebe, a recipient of an Edwin H. Fox ’44 Undergraduate Scholarship, recalled being confronted by thieves after one trip to the library, an hour’s walk from his home.,“I found myself standing still on the treacherous path,” he said. “I surveyed the peripheries wondering how I could escape or tame the knife ahead of me, pointed at me. In that moment, I offered my shoes, hoping that would pacify them and allow me safe passageway.”Radebe lost his shoes, but kept hold of “The Chronicles of Narnia.” It was the beginning of a journey of learning that eventually brought him across the globe to Harvard.Once in Cambridge, in his freshman year Radebe started an organization that provides books for primary school children in South Africa. He hopes it will give others the same sense of possibility he has.“If I can just reach one child with a book and they hold onto that book more than anything else, more than the loss they might have experienced, more than the lack of opportunity they have been afforded, I would have succeeded,” Radebe said.This year’s dinner, the 12th scholarship celebration, was held in the Northwest Science Building and co-hosted by Tim Barakett ’87, M.B.A. ’93, and Michele Barakett; Lloyd C. Blankfein ’75, J.D. ’78, and Laura Blankfein P ’16, ’10, ’08; Ken Griffin ’89; and Jerry Jordan ’61, M.B.A. ’67, and Darlene Jordan.,One of four co-chairs for financial aid, Tim Barakett detailed the success of the campaign, and the generosity of donors.“As of this week, we have reached our campaign goal of $600 million,” he said. “To give you an idea of how generous this community is, just six months ago we were short of our goal. We made an appeal, you responded, and we still have until June 30 to continue to build on our success. I am so grateful for the generosity of everyone in this room.”Co-chair Jerry Jordan said he has seen the event he helped inaugurate in 2007 come full circle.“Today, we are already seeing graduates from that year among our donors and here with us tonight,” he said. “This event represents a truly virtuous cycle.”Kicking off the student portion of the program, recent graduate Shuya Gong spoke about discovering entrepreneurship at Harvard and reflected on her brief experience as a recent graduate.,“My life had been pretty normal when I arrived at Harvard, but I didn’t really know what was next,” she said. “Mechanical engineering exposed me to the concept of creating something out of nothing. That really inspired me and really invigorated me to get up every morning and go to the lab.”She credited her professors with building on the concept of creation to encourage her to pursue entrepreneurship.“Harvard put a lot of pressure on me to grow as a person, to learn things I didn’t know previously, and to step outside my comfort zone,” Gong said. “But it never put pressure on me or my family financially, and because of that I had room to grow and thrive.”Senior Zarin Rahman, a native of South Dakota, receives aid through the Radford D. Lovett Family Scholarship Fund and plans to apply to medical school to become a pediatrician. She thanked the many donors in the room who helped make her education possible.“My love for children and my motivation to work with them has been one of the few constants in my life,” said the Mather House resident, who concentrated in neurobiology. “There is so much to learn from them: creativity, curiosity, positivity, kindness, and the purest forms of joy.“Beyond being affordable for both me and my family, Harvard has opened doors to explore my interests more than I could have imagined in my wildest dreams,” she said. “I look forward to taking these experiences and the knowledge Harvard has armed me with and trying to make the world a better place.”Cape Cod native Matthew Cappucci ’19 has always been interested in weather. So when he found there was no concentration in atmospheric sciences at Harvard, he decided to create one.,“I’m a department of one pursuing my very own special concentration,” he said. “It took months, a 30-page application, six recommendation letters, and more signatures than it would were I to run for president, but I finally got approval to pursue the first-ever atmospheric sciences concentration at Harvard.“Being a department of one has its challenges,” said Cappucci, who received a Gerald Jordan Family Scholarship. “I anticipated the path to be a lonely one. I could not have been more wrong. Harvard has given me everything and I will never be able to repay them for the incredible doors they’ve opened and the gifts they’ve given me. Thank you all for what you have done, and the support you continue to give.”The evening also featured comments from Edgerley Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Michael D. Smith and Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid William R. Fitzsimmons, both of whom extolled the financial aid program as among Harvard’s most important.“I am incredibly grateful to everyone here tonight for the powerful legacy of opportunity that you have helped to build here at Harvard,” Smith said. “As tonight so wonderfully demonstrates, financial aid empowers the next generation. Financial aid frees our students to follow their passions, and it accelerates the development of tomorrow’s leaders.”“Tonight is one of the greatest nights of my life,” Fitzsimmons said. “I believe in equality of opportunity, and if we are any kind of world or society, we need to guarantee equality of opportunity for every generation. This mission and this event defines who we are.”Ken Griffin, who in 2014 made the largest gift to financial aid in College history, agreed that providing opportunity for all is a core value.“People often ask me why I am so committed to financial aid,” he said. “Financial aid speaks to a principle that all of us hold dear as Americans. You cannot be the greatest institution in America if you do not represent the belief in equality of opportunity in your actions.”“The Harvard that we know today was made by financial aid,” said Lloyd Blankfein. “And the gratitude flows in both directions: [to and from] the donors who help worthy students realize their potential, and the worthy students [who allow] Harvard to realize its potential.” read more

‘Agnes of God’ tackles corruption in Church, questions of faith

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first_imgThe Notre Dame Student Players will premiere “Agnes of God,” a play seeking to reconcile faith with trauma, Thursday at 7 p.m. for their spring production in the Lab Theatre in Washington Hall.“Agnes of God” follows the story of Dr. Livingston, a psychiatrist asked to investigate the case of Sr. Agnes, a cloistered nun alleged to have given birth and murdered her newborn.“Dr. Livingston’s task is to determine whether or not Agnes is clinically insane,” said Savanna Morgan, the play’s director.Corinne Wehby, who plays Livingston, said Agnes’ case brings back unwelcome memories for the psychiatrist. Though Livingston grew up Catholic, personal tragedy led her to renounce her faith long ago, Wehby said.“[Livingston] just looks at the Church in a very, very poor light,” she said. “She sees this corruption and wants to protect other people from kind of falling victim to that, like she has in the past.”As she digs deeper into the case, Livingston is forced to confront the very questions of faith she had long left behind, Wehby said.“I think she, for the longest time in her life, has abandoned all ideas of the Church, of her faith,” she said. “For the first time, I think, in years, she has to start addressing these issues of faith again. … It turns into this psychological kind of war over Agnes.”When it comes to portraying darker subjects — including sexual assault — the play strikes a balance between elements of melodrama and realism, Morgan said.“I’ve done everything that I can to ignore … hyperbolizing the trauma,” she said. “When audiences come see the show, they’re able to say, ‘This is something that’s real, and something that the Church needs to confront,’ as opposed to dismissing it as, ‘Oh, this is just a story.’”Wehby said “Agnes of God” does not take sides when it comes to matters of faith, but instead seeks to show how religion — or the lack thereof — can sway individuals’ thoughts and feelings.“There’s some instances where faith is blinding some characters to different truths about the situation,” she said. “But then there’s certainly instances where for my character, her lack of faith is almost blinding her.”Assistant director Patrick Starner said the play does not dwell on its darker themes, but rather on how they work to develop its characters.“It’s more about not even quite the aftermath [of traumas], but just wrestling upon the implications that they have years afterward,” he said.The audience should not expect the play to proclaim a single message or moral, but to leave them wondering, Starner added.“The biggest thing that I hope people take away is just more like a reflection or a questioning of their own lives,” he said.Tags: Agnes of God, Notre Dame Student Players, Theatre, Washington Halllast_img read more

Panama’s government bolsters efforts against the drug trade

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PANAMA CITY, Panama – With the Panama Canal expansion scheduled to open in 2014, authorities are focused on preventing the country from serving as a transit point for illegal merchandise and drug trafficking. A total of 5% of global trade currently passes through the Panama Canal. With the construction of a third set of locks, the canal’s capacity will double, according to the Panama Canal Authority (ACP). From January to September 2013, a total of 10,149 vessels have traversed the route through Panama, according to the country’s Comptroller Office. “[The Panamanian government will not allow the canal to be used as a route by] international criminals transporting illegal merchandise,” Panamanian Public Safety Minister José Raúl Mulino said shortly after the July seizure of the North Korean freighter Chong Chon Gang. “Our geographic position, the canal and our lake and sea waters are not a passageway though which international criminals can move with impunity.” The detection of the North Korean ship, which was transporting Cuban weapons to the Asian country – a violation of United Nations resolutions levied against North Korea – was described by analysts as a success because of the speed in which intelligence agencies shared information about a vessel loaded with suspicious cargo. “The canal is a large area that supports global trade and the best way to protect it is through prevention,” said Alberto Alemán Zubieta, the former administrator of the Panama Canal. “Through intelligence work, it was possible to locate the prohibited cargo on board the Chong Chon Gang. The way to prevent terrorism and other illegal acts is through the international community and awareness about the need to prevent situations like these.” The country is taking steps to prevent its territory, including the canal, from being used to smuggle illegal substances. Operation Martillo plays a fundamental role in these efforts, according to the director of the country’s National Aeronaval Service (SENAN), Commander Belsio González Sánchez. “Through Operation Martillo [a multinational military initiative led by the United States that is combating drug trafficking and organized crime in Central America], we’re creating a symbiosis of operations with many different countries, particularly the United States, which has helped to stop incursions by drug traffickers,” González said. From January to Nov. 15, authorities confiscated about 19 tons of drugs, up from the 12 tons seized during all of 2012. The country is implementing a new base in the southern Pearl Islands in the Gulf of Panama to strengthen surveillance in the area, which will enter into operation in January 2014. Panama also has acquired speedboats, helicopters and 19 radars, to conduct coastal surveillance and combat drug trafficking in the Caribbean and the Panamanian Pacific, which are slated to become operational by April 2014. “Any investment made to enhance security is always a good thing,” said Roberto Aparicio, a professor of maritime law at Panama’s Maritime University. Regarding the canal’s operations, González said work is carried out in conjunction with the ACP to protect cargo and ensure that all permits are in order. “We work with [the ACP] on issues related to high value trafficking, because there are ships passing through with hazardous materials over which they are given custody,” González said. “[To combat drug trafficking] we have a joint operation. [The ACP makes sure that] the permits for the vessels are in order, but it does not get involved in intelligence matters.” Former Panamanian Ambassador Ricardo Arias, who directed the United Nations Security Council in 2007, has applauded the steps authorities are taking to protect the country from drug traffickers and organized crime. “Though the shipment of drugs doesn’t affect the functioning of the canal or put it at risk, Panama must introduce mechanisms to prevent the entire country from being used to smuggle illegal substances and drugs,” he said. By Dialogo December 20, 2013 read more

4 reasons to consider comprehensive insurance tracking in 2019

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first_img continue reading » As times change due to lending trends, technology growth, and the state of the economy, lenders need to be more creative when it comes to building a risk strategy that keeps both them and their borrowers protected. Insurance tracking is one data component that plays an important role in developing that comprehensive plan. Today, we’re breaking down four reasons to consider investing in an insurance tracking program as part of a larger risk strategy.But first, what is insurance tracking? Insurance tracking allows lenders to monitor borrowers’ insurance data to ensure their collateral remains protected by understanding the insurance status (or any deficiencies) of a borrower’s policy. An effective tracking system includes gathering information, maintaining and updating information, and interacting with borrowers if necessary.Many lenders are turning to data to determine the best risk strategy approach for their organization. Lenders want a complete set of data that gives insight on how to protect their portfolio, and active tracking provides an important piece of that picture. Successful programs help lenders stay protected from both expected—and unexpected— risks. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

6 ways to reduce friction in the member experience

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first_imgThe introduction of new technology in the world of financial services is both a boon and a bust for the user experience.Digital channels allow members to conduct transactions, research new products and services, and communicate with their financial institution — all on their own schedule. And for credit unions, advancements in technology offers the opportunity to serve members via personalized strategies previously unheard of.But new technology also is creating friction that manifests as long lines at the teller counter, online forms that require accountholders to reenter basic information, automatic holds on check deposits, excessive call hold times and clunky handoffs, limited hours of physical branch operations, incongruent information across channels, and frustrated or unhelpful staff. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

Industrial: Tough times ahead

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first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Harder heads reduce rail wear

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first_imgINTRO: Continuous casting of round billets has been combined with a Japanese head-hardening technique to enable the production in Pueblo of premium long-welded rails with a Brinell hardness of 390BYLINE: Mark McLeanManager, Rail ProductsCF&I Steel LPIN MAY this year CF&I Steel LP uprated the specification of its premium head-hardened rail from DHH370 to DHH390, reflecting the achievement of an average surface hardness of 390 Brinell – which makes it the hardest rail available anywhere in the world. DHH390 is 14% harder than the AREA premium rail specification of 341 Brinell, whilst meeting all the metallurgical specifications.The launch of the World Standard DHH390 rails marks the completion of a three-year upgrading of the Pueblo rail plant, following the takeover of CF&I by Oregon Steel Mills in 1993. The US$100m investment programme included conversion of the steel production plant from rectangular ingots to provide continuously-cast rounds for the rail mill, and the introduction of in-line head-hardening equipment using technology developed by Nippon Steel Corp in Japan. Further modifications to the Pueblo mill are now being drawn up to meet demands for tighter dimensional tolerances on finished rails.The entire investment strategy was driven by the increased demand from US railroads for longer-lasting low-maintenance rails capable of handling increased loadings, higher speeds, and ever-changing track dynamics. Above all there is a constant drive for lower costs and improved quality from maintenance-of-way departments. While calling for harder, cleaner rails and tighter dimensional tolerances, and for better performance by premium wear-resistant rails used on heavy-haul corridors and in sharp curves, the railroads also wanted quality assurance from the use of proven manufacturing and processing technologies.Continuous castingThe first major change at Pueblo came in February 1995, with a switch to 100% continuous cast rounds following modifications to the Mannesmann-Demag caster. The use of rounds up to 311mm diameter for rail manufacture offers three main advantages over conventional ingots. The round section offers improved control of cooling on the caster and re-heating in the rail mill furnace, which is particularly critical when producing premium rails. Quality of the rail is improved by the elimination of the corners, which can lead to rail surface defects caused by corner cracking problems when using a square or rectangular cross-section. Similarly, a round section offers improved solidification patterns which reduce the risk of centre segregation and unacceptable macro-etch patterns inherent with square or rectangular castings.At the same time a new twin-station ladle refining furnace and vacuum tank degasser were installed, allowing for adjustments in steel chemistry, precise temperature control and thermal homogeneity. Improved steel cleanliness improves the rail’s fatigue life and reduces shelling and detailed fractures, whilst precise control of the chemical content ensures consistent physical properties for both carbon steel and premium rails.Head hardeningThe Nippon Steel in-line head-hardening unit came on stream in July 1996, replacing an off-line hardening plant with an annual capacity of just 40000 tonnes. The Nippon unit has a theoretical capacity of 400000 tonnes a year. It makes use of the residual heat in the rails following rolling, with computer-controlled quenching for tight thermal management of the newly-rolled rails.The process starts with an Italimpianti re-heat furnace to ensure precise control of bloom temperatures in the rolling mill. The 84-position walking beam furnace is natural gas fired, and computer controlled for maximum fuel efficiency. A closed-loop thermal model provides for self-adjustment to match the operating parameters of the mill. Close control ensures minimum temperature variation along the length of a bloom, or between blooms. Multiple heating and quenching zones ensure a consistent temperature for blooms entering the mill, resulting in better section control. For example, the rear end of each bloom is made slightly hotter than the lead end, to compensate for natural air cooling which takes place as the bloom passes through the mill.Following the rolling process, the rails pass directly to the head-hardening unit, where they are quench-cooled in a controlled manner to achieved the required hardness and metallurgical structure; close monitoring of entry and exit temparatures are critical to the process. Two separate heat-treating units are installed, each capable of handling rails up to 25 m long.Unlike some other hardening techniques, the Nippon process does not require the addition of alloys to the steel. This means that in the event of any problems with the hardening plant, the rolled rails can easily be diverted to standard carbon steel stock – giving flexibility in the production process.To meet a growing demand for long-welded rail strings ready to lay, CF&I has installed an in-line welding plant. This takes 25 m long head-hardened rails direct from the rolling mill and welds them into strings for dispatch directly to the railroads’ relaying sites. Final length is limited only by that of the carrying train, and is typically 490 m, with up to 40 strings per train.Between July 1996 and May 1997, CF&I delivered over 60000 tonnes of DHH370 head-hardened rails to some of North America’s largest railroads: BNSF, UP, SP, NS, Montana Rail Link and several transit authorities. The rails have performed extremely well under a variety of traffic conditions.CF&I’s original strategy was based on developing a premium rail comparable to that offered by Nippon Steel Corp. The system was designed to produce rails with a surface hardness of 370 Brinell and a minimum of 341 Brinell at a depth of 10mm. In practice, quality analysis of the finished head-hardened rails has showed consistently better results, with an average hardness of 390 Brinell almost 5% better than target. Constant attention to quality at all stages of the production process has paid off with the uprating of the rail to DHH390 as a new standard. oCAPTION: CF&I’s plant is now able to produce over 400 000 tonnes of DHH390 rail a yearCAPTION: Microstructure of DHH 390 rails (1, 2) compared with NHH (3, 4) for 5 mm below the rail head surface (1, 3) and 25 mm below (2, 4)last_img read more

Eagles Host Quad Middle School Cross Country Meet

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first_imgThe Jac-Cen-Del junior high cross country teams ran in a four-way meet at home against Milan, St. Lawrence, and Sunman Dearborn on Thursday (8/22). The JCD girls’ team finished third. The JCD boys’ did not have a complete team and finished fourth. [email protected] of Eagles Coach Steve Narwold.last_img