Category Archives: hqolurxdicdw

Econet Wireless Zimbabwe Limited HY2016 Presentation

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first_imgEconet Wireless Zimbabwe Limited (ECO.zw) listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange under the Technology sector has released it’s 2016 presentation results for the half year.For more information about Econet Wireless Zimbabwe Limited (ECO.zw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Econet Wireless Zimbabwe Limited (ECO.zw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Econet Wireless Zimbabwe Limited (ECO.zw)  2016 presentation results for the half year.Company ProfileEconet Wireless Zimbabwe is a diversified telecommunications group; it is the largest enterprise of its kind in Zimbabwe and the largest company on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange in terms of market capitalisation. Econet Wireless Zimbabwe provides products and solutions for mobile and fixed wireless telephony, public payphones, internet access and payment solutions. In 2009, Econet Wireless Zimbabwe became the first operator in Zimbabwe to launch data services with 3G capability. This was followed by an extensive project to expand its geographic coverage; building a fibre-optic network, providing financial transaction switching and point-of-sale and value-added retail support services. The company is a subsidiary of a privately-owned group controlled by its founder, Strive Masiyiwa. The group’s subsidiaries include Econet Global, Econet Wireless Africa, Econet Wireless International, Econet Enterprises, Liquid Telecom Group and Econet Media.last_img read more

With the market falling, here are five ways I’d find income and growth shares

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first_img I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Andy Ross | Tuesday, 17th March, 2020 Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Image source: Getty Images “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” With the market falling, here are five ways I’d find income and growth shares Andy Ross owns no share mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. See all posts by Andy Rosscenter_img Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. The ongoing uncertainty around the coronavirus means the stock market has plunged. What the government, and central banks around the world, are doing so far is clearly not reassuring investors. And interest rates have been cut even further. This makes saving into a bank account even less appealing than it was before. In his budget, Chancellor Rishi Sunak revealed £30bn of measures to support the economy. Yet the FTSE 100 fell last Wednesday, the day of the budget.In this falling market, I’d be tempted to do more research into companies that could offer a valuable combination of income and growth potential. There are many ways to find companies like this. Indeed, many Foolish writers identify them daily. These five ratios serve as a starting point for identifying potentially great companies. That means companies that could bounce back strongly when the stock market recovers. 5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…The value ratiosThe P/E ratio and PEG ratio aren’t particularly complicated to work out. They certainly don’t require a maths degree, or even an A-Level. For anyone serious about investing in individual shares, they’re a baseline required to assess whether a share is cheap or expensive. The Price-to-Earnings (P/E) ratio measures the relationship between a company’s stock price and its earnings per share. The ratio is calculated by dividing a company’s current stock price by its earnings per share (EPS).The Price/Earnings-to-Growth (PEG) ratio is a good one to use in conjunction. It is used to determine a stock’s value. But it also factors-in the company’s expected earnings growth. As such, it provides more detail on value than the P/E alone. It’s calculated by dividing the P/E by earnings per share growth.The dividend ratiosThe dividend yield is our third ratio and is a useful figure for working out income from shares. Up to a point, the higher the better. But dividend yields that are too high can be a sign that a cut is coming. This usually also results in a steep share price fall. Most financial websites show the dividend yield of listed companies.To better understand what might happen in future with the dividend, and if it’s sustainable, an investor would be well advised to also look at ratios four and five. These are dividend cover and dividend growth.The former shows how well earnings cover the dividend payout. A figure above two times is great. But some larger FTSE 100 companies can operate between 1.1 and 1.5 for many consecutive years without the need for a dividend cut. This is riskier though, especially if the economy worsens.The rate of dividend growth is also important. That’s because year-on-year increases in the dividend over time add up to larger shareholder payouts. This plays a big part in helping investors make money from shares. They can reinvest income back into buying more shares. And they get the income from those additional shares. This is a phenomenon called compounding.I hope these simple five figures will help you find shares with growth and income potential. Enter Your Email Address Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool.last_img read more

Congresswoman Chu Presents Military Medals to Pasadena Korean War Veteran

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first_img Community News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * First Heatwave Expected Next Week Make a comment Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday More Cool Stuff faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPasadena Water and PowerPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Subscribe Top of the News Government Congresswoman Chu Presents Military Medals to Pasadena Korean War Veteran Published on Monday, September 5, 2016 | 6:34 pmcenter_img Herbeauty10 Most Influential Women In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThat Sale Made Kim A BillionaireHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Dark Side Of Beauty Salons Not Many People Know AboutHerbeautyHerbeauty 3 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Community News Business News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Rep. Judy Chu (CA-27) and Cpl. Buddy Leland BrowerPasadena area Congresswoman Judy Chu presented Corporal Buddy Leland Brower with the military medals he earned but never received while serving in the United States Army during the Korean War in a Labor Day ceremony in her office.Long-time Pasadenan Brower explained that at the end of his enlistment in 1953 he was sent to an office, directed to the rear of the room to pick up his orders, and told to go home. Once he arrived back in the country, he was discharged without his awards.After waiting several decades, he finally reached out to Congresswoman Judy Chu (CA-27) for help in obtaining his medals. Rep. Chu contacted the National Personnel Records Center, who provided the medals. Rep. Chu released the following statement:“I am so honored to present to Buddy Leland Brower the medals he earned while serving our country. I was shocked to learn that after he was discharged from the Army he never received his awards or a simple thank you. Today we make things rights by recognizing Mr. Brower for all his sacrifices and finally presenting him with the medals he earned while fighting for our country during the Korean War. Thank you Buddy Leland Brower for your service to the United States of America!”For his service, Brower received the following medals: Purple Heart, Good Conduct Medal, Presidential Unit Citation, Army of Occupation Medal & Japan Clasp, National Defense Service Medal, Korean Service Medal & 2 Bronze Star Attachments, Combat Infantryman Badge 1st Award and United Nations Service MedalRep. Chu continued, “Buddy received his Purple Heart after his squadron came under heavy attack. During the attack, mortar rounds were being shot at his squadron, cutting through trees and injuring the men. Mr. Brower describes his injury as ‘merely a cut or scratch on the hand’ but his story paints a more dramatic and powerful picture. A mortar round had cut through a large tree branch which landed on a fellow service member, who in turn fell upon Mr. Brower. As he attempted to free himself from under the heavy weight of the tree branch and service member, his helmet fell which exposed his forehead to debris and enemy fire. He protected his head with his hands as he pulled himself away and only realized he had several cuts across his hand from the mortar shrapnel after getting free. The cuts across his hand could have been upon his forehead had he not covered his face. He simply characterizes his experience as ‘lucky’ and ‘a gift from god’.“Buddy also depicted another courageous moment when his squadron followed another team up a hill before taking over as lead toward the top. At the top of the ridge Buddy’s squadron was fired upon. Many were injured and killed during the battle. They pulled back a bit and attempted to fight but the assault was too overwhelming. The officer in charge wanted to retreat back but there were still some wounded men out in the field. Mr. Brower took it upon himself to run out and help another soldier carry an injured friend out of the line of fire and into a safer area.”Brower is 85 years old and a longtime native from the City of Pasadena. Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m.last_img read more

Educate Together Model favoured by Cllr Shortt

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first_imgNewsLocal NewsEducate Together Model favoured by Cllr ShorttBy admin – July 12, 2011 672 WhatsApp Advertisement COUNCILLOR Tom Shortt favours the use of the Educate Together model of school patronage.He was responding to a call from the Diocese of Limerick for professionals to take up vacant positions on school boards.At present just two schools in Limerick use the Educate Together model, but Cllr Shortt holds the view there is room for growth.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “I have believed for over 25 years that the Educate Together model of patronage of primary schools is the more realistic and appropriate model which acknowledges and accommodates changes in Irish society.“The model recognises diversity with regard to religious belief as no one religion is promoted in the classroom. In essence, there is freedom of religion for families. Children can attend denominational instruction after normal school hours”.The Labour councillor said professionals are needed on school boards, with religious domination of education on the wane.Cllr Shortt, an art teacher at Scoil Carmel on O’Connell Avenue, has served on the board of management of the multi-denominational Limerick School’s Project.“It is a huge responsibility. You may not see the Board of Management, but it is very much how a school operates”.He has been an increase in social capital in recent times, and the call made by the Diocese of Limerick, he added, would appeal to people.“There is an enormous amount of voluntary work involved in running a school.“The expertise of a professional, like a solicitor or an accountant, would be of major benefit.“Should schools be moving towards a more multi-denominational ethos? Should the ethos of schools be re-examined? These are questions we need to look at.“I think it’s a refection of the times we live, and opens up the broader issue of governance of schools.“This shows a changing climate in the country and we need to recognise that religious practices are changing”. He favours the multi-denominational format.“I was very involved in getting the multi-denominational movement off the ground in Limerick.“Many are advancing the Educate Together project at the moment”.According to him, the Educate Together model offers a lot.“This experience prepares children to participate in the modern Ireland which is both pluralist and multi cultural, and is a practical way of teaching them to respect people of other religious and cultural backgrounds as equals.“It also encourages greater democracy with greater parental responsibility and involvement in the running of the school. The seats on the boards are filled entirely by parents and teachers. In my opinion, parents should consider this model”. Twitter Printcenter_img Linkedin Email Previous articleTina’s fundraising heads to €1m markNext articleArchitect – peopled streets draw people in admin Facebooklast_img read more

July’s trolley figures were the worst ever

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first_imgJoint Easter message on Covid 19 from Limerick City and County Council, HSE, UL Hospitals and An Garda Síochána Call for Government action as 81 patients wait for beds in UHL University Hospital LimerickRECORD numbers of patients had to wait for a bed after being admitted to hospital last month with University Hospital Limerick (UHL) faring worst of all.9,439 hospital patients were forced to wait without a bed, the highest number ever recorded in July, according to a new monthly analysis by the INMO.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up In Limerick, 1,293 patients had to be accommodated on trolleys or in overflow wards until a bed in a regular ward was freed up.Compared to July 2018, there has been an increase of 33 per cent. When records began in 2006, there were 3,460 patients on trolleys in July, which is around a third of this month’s figure.At that time, the INMO did not count patients waiting for a bed in overflow wards or areas other than the ED, however.Among the 9,439 patients were 45 children.INMO Director of Industrial Relations, Tony Fitzpatrick.INMO Director of Industrial Relations, Tony Fitzpatrick said thatevery day there are hundreds of patients languishing in corridors, waiting for a hospital bed.“Currently over 700 patients cannot be discharged from hospital. In the meantime, hundreds of frontline nursing and midwifery posts are currently vacant due to the HSE’s dysfunctional and bureaucratic employment control processes,” he added.UHL group has consistently said that they do not have adequate bed numbers for the population they service.A 60 bed-block is currently underway and there are plans for a new block to provide more than 90 additional beds. TAGShealthHSEINMOLimerick City and CountyNewsUHLuniversity hospital limerick Limerick Post Show | Careers & Health Sciences Event for TY Students Twitter WhatsApp Email Previous articleLimerick movie jobs to rise from €45 million foundationNext articleThe Murder Capital / Steamboat Music album event Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. Printcenter_img SCAM ALERT: HSE warn of bogus calls following cyber attack Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Advertisement Linkedin Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites NewsHealthJuly’s trolley figures were the worst everBy Bernie English – August 1, 2019 130 World Sepsis Day – Have You Asked, ‘Could it be Sepsis?’last_img read more

Car Show

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first_img Car Show TAGScar showPilot Club of OdessaWest Texas Street Rod Association By Odessa American – April 23, 2021 Twitter Facebook Twitter The West Texas Street Rod Association and Pilot Club of Odessa have scheduled the second annual Car Show from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at Taco Villa, 1710 E. Eight St.Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. Entry fee is $30.There will be a raffle for Traeger Grill and three Coach purses and a silent auction. Proceeds provide services to our community through Odessa Pilot Cub projects for youth, people with brain disorders and senior citizens.For more information, call Jimmy Austin at 432-413-0410 or Patty Austin at 432-413-2526.For entry form, visit tinyurl.com/22s94sn8 click on event image to download entry form. Pinterestcenter_img WhatsApp WhatsApp Facebook Local News Pinterest Previous articleEarly votingNext articleCommunity Art Day Odessa Americanlast_img read more

Cllr Shiels slams Council for not advertising availability of Strategic Development Fund

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first_img 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Pinterest WhatsApp 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Google+ Pinterest By News Highland – February 19, 2015 WhatsApp News RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Cllr Shiels slams Council for not advertising availability of Strategic Development Fundcenter_img Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry A Donegal County Cllr has hit out at the Council for not advertising the availability of the Strategic Development Fund.Under the fund 740,000 euro is allocated to community, voluntary and sporting groups in Co Donegal.The minimum amount which may be awarded to any single group is 2,500 euro and the maximum is 25,000 euro. The deadline to apply for the fund is February 27th.Cllr Dessie Shiels claims that the Council has taken the decision not to advertise the fund, and he says because of this a lot of groups will be unaware that they can even apply:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/dess1pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Twitter Facebook Facebook Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Previous articleInishowen Motors and Highland Radio Celebrate 5 Year PartnershipNext articleSuspicious object has been discovered in the front garden of a home in Derry News Highland Google+ Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

Protective pigmentation in UVB-screened Antarctic lichens studied by Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy: an extremophile bioresponse to radiation stress

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first_imgFT-Raman spectra were obtained for two Antarctic extremophiles, the epilithic lichens Xanthoria elegans and Caloplaca sublobulata from the maritime ecological long-term research site on Leonie Island. Twelve specimens from cloches designed for the filtering out and transmission of UVB radiation over a 2 year period and two specimens from the natural habitat outside the cloches were analysed in terms of their characteristic Raman bands from the two photoprotective pigments parietin and beta-carotene. Following chemometric analysis, the specimens inside the UVB-protective cloches exhibited a lower parietin:beta-carotene ratio than specimens from the same habitat that did not have UVB protection. The relative roles of parietin, a passive UVB photoprotectant, and beta-carotene are discussed and a possible duality of biological function is suggested for these pigments.last_img read more

Governance Review Culminates in Changes to Harvard Corporation

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first_imgThe Harvard Corporation, the governing board formally known as the President and Fellows of Harvard College, will undertake a number of changes to its composition, structure, and practices, it was announced today (December 6).Intended to reinforce the Corporation’s strategic focus and enlarge its collective capacity, the changes grow out of an intensive governance review launched in the fall of 2009.  The review concluded with a joint meeting of the Corporation and the University’s Board of Overseers this past Saturday, December 4, at which key changes were adopted by the boards.“At a time when many different parts of Harvard have been reflecting on their roles and how best to fulfill them, all of us on the Corporation have thought this an opportune moment to step back and think purposefully about our own responsibilities and structures,” wrote President Drew Faust and Robert D. Reischauer, the Corporation’s senior fellow, in a letter to the Harvard community.  “We have challenged ourselves to consider how the Corporation, created in the mid-17th century, can assure the capacities needed to guide and serve our vastly larger, more ambitious, and more diverse University in the 21st.”As described in a committee report on the governance review, the changes include a doubling of the number of Corporation members other than the president, from six to 12, to expand the Corporation’s collective capacity and breadth of expertise.  There will be prescribed periods of service for the Corporation’s fellows, to assure a balance of continuity and fresh perspective, as well as a more defined leadership role for the Corporation’s senior fellow.  The Corporation will create three standing committees to assure in-depth focus on key areas of core fiduciary concern:  finance, facilities and capital planning, and governance.  In addition, the two governing boards will launch a joint committee on alumni affairs and development, as Harvard prepares for a University-wide campaign and aims to integrate the boards’ work in this domain.“The Corporation has been at the heart of Harvard’s evolution and progress ever since it was chartered in 1650, a century and a quarter before the American Revolution,” said Faust.  “The governance review has given us a welcome occasion not just to reflect on the Corporation’s history but to challenge ourselves to consider a set of changes that can extend and deepen its capacity as we look ahead.  It’s been gratifying to contemplate how the President and Fellows can spur the efforts of all of us around Harvard to look forward with imagination and discipline, to navigate complexity and change, and to shape strategies that help our academic enterprise thrive.”The report underscores the Corporation’s intention to concentrate increasing attention on matters of strategic direction and high-level policy, with an emphasis on the productive interplay of the University’s different parts.  The report also highlights plans to inform the community more regularly about key aspects of the Corporation’s work, to create more opportunities for members of the Corporation to hear from various people within the University community, and to continue strengthening working relationships between the Corporation and the Board of Overseers.“We’ve benefited throughout the review from the candid observations of deans, former board members, faculty, alumni, and others, whose shared devotion to Harvard’s well-being couldn’t be clearer,” said Reischauer.  “I’m confident that the changes we’re pursuing will give us greater scope to see the big picture and take the long view, to probe areas that most warrant the Corporation’s in-depth attention, to calibrate both opportunities and risks, and to consider Harvard’s distinctive parts in relation to the larger whole.”The review was conducted by a committee comprising the seven members of the Corporation as well as three colleagues with experience on the Board of Overseers.  The Corporation’s current members are President Faust; Nannerl O. Keohane, L.L.D. (hon.) ’93, Laurance S. Rockefeller Distinguished Visiting Professor of Public Affairs at Princeton University and past president of Duke University and Wellesley College; Patricia A. King, J.D. ’69, Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Law, Medicine, Ethics, and Public Policy at the Georgetown University Law Center; William F. Lee, A.B. ’72, co-managing partner of Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr; Robert D. Reischauer, A.B. ’63, president of the Urban Institute and past director of the Congressional Budget Office; James F. Rothenberg, A.B. ’68, M.B.A. ’70, chairman, principal executive officer, and director of Capital Research and Management Company and treasurer of Harvard University; and Robert E. Rubin, A.B. ’60, L.L.D. (hon.) ’01, co-chairman of the Council on Foreign Relations and former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury.  Lee joined the committee upon beginning his Corporation service in July 2010, replacing James R. Houghton, who stepped down from the Corporation on June 30 after helping to launch the review.The governance review committee also included Frances D. Fergusson, A.M. ’66, Ph.D. ’73, president emerita of Vassar College and president of Harvard’s Board of Overseers in 2007-08; Robert N. Shapiro, A.B. ’72, J.D. ’78, a lawyer, past president of the Harvard Alumni Association, and current chair of the Overseers Committee on Institutional Policy; and Seth P. Waxman, A.B. ’73, former U.S. Solicitor General, former HAA elected director, and current president of the Board of Overseers.“Harvard has flourished over centuries in no small part because it has managed to balance a sense of enduring purpose and values with a capacity to adapt and look ahead,” said Waxman.  “These changes are well-designed to enhance the University’s governance, in service of the academic enterprise that all of us on the governing boards are devoted to advance and serve.”The committee was advised by Richard Chait, one of the nation’s leading authorities on higher education governance, now a Research Professor at the Graduate School of Education.“Our Overseer colleagues and Professor Chait brought a great deal of insight and perspective to our deliberations, including both a sense of Harvard’s distinctive culture and a broad view of governance practices elsewhere,” said Reischauer.  “We couldn’t have asked for more engaged, helpful, and constructively critical partners.  I also want to thank Jamie Houghton, my predecessor as senior fellow, who played an essential role in getting this review started and in guiding its early phase.”According to the report, a process will soon begin to select new members of the Corporation, with the expectation of expanding the Corporation from seven to 13 members within two to three years.  Confidential advice and nominations may be directed by e-mail to [email protected] or by letter to Harvard Corporation Search, Loeb House, 17 Quincy St., Cambridge, MA 02138.last_img read more

In racial protests, a continuing ripple effect

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first_imgAs protests have continued to percolate nationally in the wake of decisions by grand juries in Missouri and New York not to indict police officers in the deaths of two unarmed black men, hundreds of members of the Harvard community have expressed their own frustration and desire for change during a range of demonstrations and discussions both on campus and off.Hundreds of protesters, including many from the Harvard community, took to the streets Friday night, briefly stopping traffic in Harvard Square and then marching down Memorial Drive to Central Square before returning. The demonstration resembled weekend protests in other cities where thousands also marched.In recent days, many from the Harvard community have attended protests, marches, vigils, and “die-ins,” in which participants lie down in a show of solidarity and dissent against violence toward black men. Many community members engaged in informal campus conversations and listening sessions organized by deans and administrators of Harvard’s graduate schools. Some students penned open letters and op-eds calling for action.“Our students are no different than many people across this country who feel, with these recent decisions or nondecisions, that injustice has overplayed its hand,” said Jonathan Walton, Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church, who took part in campus protests and helped organize a student-led “die-in” on the church steps a week ago.“Black lives matter,” Harvard President Drew Faust said, echoing ongoing concern across the University. “It has taken far too long to make that fundamental truth a living, essential part of the fabric of our society, our government, and our lives. Martin Luther King Jr. made clear a half century ago why we can’t wait. What was urgent then is imperative now.”Last week, Faust recalled her early involvement in the national campaign for civil rights.“Nearly 50 years ago, I watched on a grainy black-and-white television as the heads and bodies of John Lewis and dozens more protesters were bloodied as they peacefully marched to secure the right to vote. I, and thousands of other Americans, could not remain silent,” she recalled. “I skipped my freshman college midterms and drove from Pennsylvania to Selma, Alabama, to bear witness, to affirm with my presence something essential about who I was and about what I wanted our nation to be. It seemed to me an inescapable necessity. John Lewis might have called it making ‘necessary trouble.’“Now, a half century later, individuals from across Harvard and across the nation have embraced a similar imperative to refuse silence, to reject injustice, to demand something better from ourselves and our nation,” she said. “I mourn that this is still necessary, that injustice still thrives so many years after we hoped we could at last overcome the troubled legacy of race in America. But I also celebrate how in recent days our community has demonstrated its commitment in both words and deeds to eradicating every pernicious form of racism and discrimination. ‘What will you do?’ Rev. Jonathan Walton asked in Memorial Church last Sunday. We will speak out against injustice; we will join together to insist that things must change.”The public reactions to the grand jury rulings in Missouri and New York have had a ripple effect at Harvard. On Dec. 1, students joined a protest with others from Cambridge Rindge and Latin School, briefly stopping traffic in Harvard Square. Two days later, a student-organized protest unfolded in front of the John Harvard Statue. Approximately 200 people took part in the demonstration, which included comments from Harvard faculty and a “die-in.”“A big point of the protest was to get people to interact with this issue who maybe have the privilege to ignore it because it doesn’t directly affect their lives,” said a rally organizer, Fadhal Moore ’15, who is a member of the Black Community Leaders, an umbrella group for undergraduate black organizations.The oldest of five who said he often thinks about his siblings, worrying that they could be killed by police someday, Moore called the campus reaction hopeful. “At the end of the day,” he said, “it has been very, very encouraging to see all these people come together.”Demonstrations and forums have touched most of the University in recent days. Harvard Law School (HLS) Dean Martha Minow, who wrote a column for the Boston Globe last Tuesday calling for reforms to the nation’s criminal justice system, invited members of the HLS community to a conversation with her and faculty members the following day to discuss the issues and “to think together about how we might move forward and contribute to the effort,” she said in an email announcing the session.At Harvard Business School, about 500 people gathered in Burden Hall to remember Michael Brown and Eric Garner and raise awareness about racial profiling.Last Wednesday, close to 100 people, including Harvard students, faculty, administrators, and staff, gathered for a candid discussion at Phillips Brooks House led by Harvard College Dean Rakesh Khurana and Emelyn dela Peña, the College’s assistant dean of student life for equity, diversity, and inclusion.“Many in our College community are in pain and struggling right now, and no matter our understanding of the issue, we must come together to comfort and support each other,” wrote Khurana in an email titled “Standing Together” that announced the event.The hourlong discussion touched on many of the challenges surrounding frank conversations about race. Several attendees wondered how to be better allies to the African-American community. Others responded that being an effective ally means being willing to take risks and getting comfortable with uncomfortable conversations. Some called for greater support from the administration. Administrators in the room answered with pledges to renew commitments to connecting with minorities and allies across campus.“I appreciate what you said, that we have to do better,” said Khurana, “and we have to be willing to take risks, and that also means, I guess, a little more forgiveness on the other end.”Following the talk, Sarah Cole, a senior and president of the Harvard Black Students Association, said she felt encouraged.“I think it’s important for this campus as a whole to acknowledge what has happened, to acknowledge how it has affected people, both internally and externally. And so it’s really powerful to see our administrators and our students and our faculty coming together in this space to actually do that.”Sophomore and Mather House resident Olivia Castor said she was also heartened to see members of the faculty and the administration taking part. “I know at several other schools throughout the country, students don’t have the support of their faculty and administrators, and to see that here we do, it’s just really amazing and it’s really reaffirming.”Similar listening sessions, conversations, and discussions have taken place elsewhere. The Harvard Graduate School of Design, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Harvard Kennedy School all convened talks with students, faculty, staff, and administrators last week. At Harvard Medical School, which also hosted an open forum, more than 100 HMS students, joined by faculty and staff, took part in a nationwide medical student “die-in” last Wednesday, lying on the floor of Harvard’s Tosteson Medical Education Center on Longwood Avenue in Boston for 15½ minutes.The Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) held an earlier open dialogue for students, organized by the school’s student council and office of student affairs. The session was attended by Dean James E. Ryan and came the day after the grand jury decided not to indict Darren Wilson, the white police officer who fatally shot Brown in August. The HGSE’s dean’s office also created a fellowship fund for students interested in doing social justice work in Missouri or in Greater Boston in January. Last Tuesday, students also led a “die-in” in the Gutman Library.In addition to supporting and helping to organize recent protests and marches, Harvard Divinity School (HDS) students, with help from Walton, traveled to Ferguson, Mo., in August to support local organizations and protesters. Students from HLS have also gone to Ferguson in recent months to offer support and act as legal observers.HLS students have also organized protests and events. McKenzie Morris, president of the Harvard Black Law Students Association, said her organization has been “active on this point since the Mike Brown death in August.” In October, the group organized a conference with members of the Boston and Cambridge communities, including representatives of each city’s police departments, to discuss issues such as the accountability of law enforcement. The group co-hosted a campus talk about race with the School’s American Constitution Society and recently sent an open letter to President Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder with more than 1,000 signatures that included a call for legislation requiring police to wear body cameras.Across campus, many students said they have taken comfort in the ability to simply share their grief and frustration with others from the community.After the Ferguson decision, HDS students held a gathering in one of the School’s small chapels. People sat in silence, sang, cried out, spoke, testified, prayed, “whatever their hearts led them to do,” recalled HDS student Melissa Bartholomew. “Because I have spaces like that — and a community to connect with, and a community that is diverse and crosses all faiths lines, and gender lines, and economic lines, and racial lines — to be in the midst of spaces like that is so healing and encouraging and affirming for me as an African-American woman going through these experiences. I’ve been really grateful for each opportunity that we’ve had to gather as a community.”During his Sunday sermon a week ago, Walton told listeners: “For those who think that this is overblown, until one feels the dehumanizing blow of being of the wrong race in the wrong space, and thus always and already guilty upon arrival, one should refrain from all the sanctimonious bromides about guilt, innocence, or simply following the law.”Just before the service ended, Walton made his way outside to the church steps, where he urged protesters, many of them students, to start “thinking about your careers in such a way that you can help dislodge, you can help dislodge our criminal system from the bitter hands of corruption.” The group then took part in a “die-in,” causing members of the congregation to step over them as they exited the church.“Martin Luther King Jr. once said that desegregation is about physical proximity, but integration is about spiritual affinity, and so really it’s about the human connection. And so one of the things that I wanted to do was to bring students together with the worshiping community on Sunday,” said Walton later in the week.Castor, who also helped organize the Memorial Church session, said the goal was to get those who don’t think the issue affects them to see things differently.“It interrupted daily life because it forced you to take another path. It forced you to go somewhere where you wouldn’t have gone before … that’s why I thought it was very, very powerful, and very important.”Faust said she hoped that meaningful, lasting change comes out of the current protests and discussions.“I hope that in the half century to come, our remarkable students will also commit to use their lives and their education — in law, in medicine, in education, in public health, in politics, in the arts, and in so many other fields — in service of the freedom, dignity, and equality they have called for this week. At this University, we have a special responsibility to speak and live the truth. This challenges us to use our voices and our actions to help build a world in which we work to make our values real, a world in which differences are not sources of oppression and divisiveness, but of strength and community, a world of justice for all.”last_img read more