Category Archives: dgyrqapydnrh

Case study of a Chinese dust plume reaching the French Alps

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first_imgBy combining reconstruction of airmass back-trajectories from dust deposition sites in Europe and measurements of the (Nd) isotopic composition of deposited dust particles, potential sources of different Saharan dust events can be identified. The study of “red dust” events collected in France allowed us to identify distinct North African source areas (e.g. Lybia vs. Mauritania). Surprisingly, the airmass trajectory of one dust event (March 6, 1990) was distinct from the others, and revealed a Chinese origin. The Nd isotopic composition of this dust was consistent with the range of isotopic compositions of Chinese loess. Moreover, an atmospheric global model simulation reveals that a dust plume left China before February 25, 1990, flew over North America around the February/March transition and reached the French Alps by March 6, 1990, revealing that intercontinental dust and pollutant transport may occur across the Pacific Ocean and the North Atlantic at the Westerlies latitudes.last_img read more

Dutch Navy’s Pelikaan to undergo mid-life electrical refit

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first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Dutch Navy’s support ship Pelikaan to undergo mid-life electrical refit navaltoday Dutch Navy’s support ship Pelikaan to undergo mid-life electrical refit View post tag: Alewijnse Marine May 25, 2020, by View post tag: Royal Netherlands Navycenter_img Equipment & technology Share this article Alewijnse Marine is undertaking the assessment for the upcoming electrical refit that will be an important part of the mid-life refit of the Royal Netherlands Navy’s logistic support vessel HNLMS Pelikaan (A804).Alewijnse was awarded the contract by Damen Shipyards Den Helder in August last year and commenced work in January. The work is being carried out in Den Helder and at Damen Shiprepair Harlingen.The 65.4-meter-long Zr.Ms. Pelikaan operates exclusively in the Caribbean region where she provides support to maritime security operations and, in times of disaster, humanitarian relief. The support ship is permanently based at Curaçao.Alewijnse’s scope of work during the refit project is said to be extensive. The company is responsible for total service provision for the electrical work, covering engineering, supply and installation of equipment, project coordination and commissioning of all on board electrical systems. This includes the installation of brand new telephone, radar, CCTV and alarm and monitoring systems (AMS).Alewijnse undertook the original electrical installation when the vessel was built at Damen Shipyards Galati in Romania in 2005. The company is expected to complete the new project on time, enabling the vessel to be back in the Caribbean in time for the Hurricane season.COVID-19 pandemicThe project has faced additional challenges as a result of the coronavirus crisis. Alewijnse’s contract manager Perry Eikelenboom explained: “The safety of our personnel and of all those working on location is our top priority during this project. Maintaining safe distances while working and minimising the number of people on location at any one time place pressure on the schedule, but are essential.”“Thankfully, we enjoy a close cooperation with the yard and, working together and following their robust safety measures, we manage to be both efficient and safe.”Related:Dutch Navy upgrades support vessel HNLMS Pelikaan View post tag: HNLMS Pelikaanlast_img read more

The Album That Changed My Life: The Jimi Hendrix Experience’s ‘Are You Experienced’ [Listen]

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first_imgI come from a musical family. My parents—lifelong patrons of the arts—always made an effort to assure that my siblings and I were exposed to culture. We grew up singing along to Broadway cast albums and going to orchestra concerts in the park. They showed us a broad spectrum of music, from Mozart to Beethoven, The Andrews Sisters to Louis Armstrong, Carole King to Harry Chapin, The Monkees to the Beatles. As my parents would educate us about what we were hearing, I became just as fascinated by the stories surrounding the music as the music itself. I still remember the first time I nerd-ed out over a band’s mythology: sitting on our living room floor, my mom’s old Sgt. Pepper’s LP playing on the record player, while she filled me in about the infamous “Paul is dead” hoax, showing me all the “evidence” from the Beatles’ album covers and original photo inserts.I started playing classical violin at a young age, and continued to play through elementary school. By the time I was in fourth grade, I had become a relatively skilled player, but I had also started to develop resentment toward the violin. The lessons were boring, practicing felt like a chore, but most significantly, the music I was playing never got me excited. Not a single composer in my Suzuki violin books had a cool death hoax I could dig into. By that point, I was more interested in Black Sabbath than Vivaldi, and there are no violins in “Crazy Train”, so I decided it was time to switch to the guitar.I could strum a few chords and, like every new guitar student, play a pretty mean “Smoke On The Water” by the time I started taking lessons for real in 5th grade. On my first day of lessons my new teacher, Ed, asked me what I wanted to play, and I realized, embarrassed, that despite all my excitement to start becoming a rock star, I hadn’t thought of something to learn. But Ed had seen me eyeing the Jimi Hendrix poster on his wall, popped in a CD called Are You Experienced and hit play on “Purple Haze”. I had heard of Jimi Hendrix before. I knew how revered he was as a guitarist, and had probably even heard this song before. But in this setting, sitting with my new guitar, listening intently…something clicked. From the opening lick, I was hooked. It was angry. It was loud. It had attitude. It was pure emotion. It was beautiful. It was unlike anything I had ever heard.I bought a copy of Are You Experienced on my way home, stripped off the plastic, and had the CD in my walkman before we had left the parking lot. As I sat in my seat, listening again to the album’s opening “Purple Haze” while I gazed out the window, my mind wandered to 1967, when the music world first heard an artist who would change it forever in the form of the very album I was listening to right now. My expectations for what was coming couldn’t have been higher, but somehow, song by song, Are You Experienced exceeded them.I had to ask my mom what “Manic Depression” meant, but once she told me, it became clear that this song was its sonic equivalent, as its unhinged percussion was amazingly unified when Jimi’s guitar and vocals entered the fold. “Hey Joe” was the coolest song I had ever heard. The lyrics were gritty and startling and delivered with beautiful, raging emotion. Three songs in, and I was already in awe of this man. “Love Or Confusion” asked a philosophical question I hadn’t yet needed to ponder at my young age, but it still sounded like poetry to me, with its heavily distorted, loose feel and full, rich sound. The lyrics laid the foundation, but music gave them life. “May This Be Love” sounded like waves washing onto a magic beach, the guitar barely washing up over the booming toms and crashing cymbals.I was dumbfounded by the sounds that Hendrix created: “I Don’t Live Today” literally used amplifier feedback as the featured instrument on its opening verse. “The Wind Cries Mary” was a strange and beautiful ballad, evoking Dali-esque images in my mind’s eye that I still see every time I hear this song. “Fire” was pure, unadulterated rock n’ roll, and Jimi tore into the vocals with his nonchalant rockstar abandon. The jazz-fusion “Third Stone From The Sun” was trippy and weird and instantly stuck in my mind. I don’t listen to it often anymore, but I still frequently find myself humming or playing the breezy guitar lick to this day.“Foxey Lady”, “Are You Experienced?”, “Stone Free”,  and “51st Anniversary” continued to entrance me with Hendrix’s huge presence and attention-grabbing lyrics. The weeping guitar intro and boogying groove of “Highway Chile”, the layered vocals of “Can You See Me”, the supple guitar and soulful singing on “Remember”–it all sounded incredible; aggressively unique and effortlessly cool. The album’s finale, “Red House,” took me by surprise one last time. Hendrix’s wounded wail was so honest, so real, so raw. “Red House” was red-hot blues, and was the song that eventually led me to some of my all-time favorite guitarists like B.B. King and Stevie Ray Vaughan.I was completely inexperienced with the level of excitement I felt while getting acquainted with Are You Experienced. In the months that followed, I dove headfirst into the album and Hendrix in both a musical and scholarly sense. I did research, learning everything I could about Jimi and his legendary debut. I happily and voluntarily practiced my guitar every day, learning–or, at least, attempting to learn–every song that I could from the album. I even asked my teacher to transcribe some of the album’s weirder guitar parts note-for-note so I could learn them.Eventually, I would branch out to different albums, different artists. I’ve fallen in love with countless bands and albums since, learning every word, every note, researching their stories, letting them consume me as I did with Are You Experienced. Today, the music I love is a huge part of my life. I can’t begin to count the number of amazing people met, lessons learned, memories made, and priceless experiences had in my life thanks to my continued passion for music. I have Are You Experienced to thank for igniting that passion. When I was 10 years old, Jimi Hendrix blew me away and showed me how to love music, and I’ve been flying ever since.Excuse me, while I kiss the sky. [Originally published September 2016]last_img read more

Family fellows

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first_img Centuries later, long walk home Coetzee recalls a reading childhood Physics professor follows in footsteps of his hunted Waldensian ancestors Sonia Gomez and Marla Ramírez were a few weeks into their postdoctoral fellowships at the Mahindra Humanities Center when they met in Ramírez’s office to discuss their research and common interests. Both California natives, the women talked about their shared scholarship in the study of migration, their Los Angeles roots, and how to balance work and family.They discussed their spouses — Ramírez’s husband, José Molina Ruano, works in construction and Gomez’s husband, Marlon, is a plumber — and discovered both men have roots in Yahualica, a small town in the Mexican state of Jalisco. It wasn’t long before they realized they shared the family name Ruano.“This cannot be!” Gomez screamed.Ramírez was giddy: “Oh my goodness, we’re family!”Furious texting to extended family ensued, and the couples soon realized José’s maternal grandfather, Pablo Ruano-Ruano, is a first cousin of Marlon’s paternal grandmother, Guadalupe Ruano-Gomez. The couples said that both José and Marlon’s fair skin, light hair, and eye color as babies are common traits in Yahualica, which experienced an influx of Germans in the 19th century. Both José and Marlon — whose father, Raul, was born there, spoke about their families having a German ancestor named Ruan; they theorized that at some point an “o” was added “to make it more Spanish-sounding.” During Christmas break, Ramírez’s in-laws, Refugio and Carmela Molina, visited and were shown pictures of Marlon’s family.“They said, ‘That’s my Tia Lupe,’” Ramírez recalled. “We exchanged notes and stories. That is how we gathered the information and verified our family connection.”The 34-year-old historian of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands is an assistant professor of sociology and sexuality studies at San Francisco State University. She studies the history of the Mexican repatriation during the Great Depression that resulted in approximately 1 million removals of Mexicans and Mexican Americans from 1921 to 1944. Ramírez has located U.S. citizens of Mexican descent who were unconstitutionally removed from their native country during the Depression and eventually returned to the U.S. As an oral historian, she interviewed banished U.S. citizens, their children, and their grandchildren to understand the prolonged consequences of unconstitutional mass removals across three generations, paying close attention to gendered migration experiences.,An undocumented Mexican immigrant and first-generation scholar, Ramírez started at Cerritos College in Norwalk, Calif., before transferring in 2005 to the University of California, Los Angeles. She received a Ph.D. at the University of California, Santa Barbara, in Chicana and Chicano studies with a grounding in history and a doctoral emphasis in feminist studies. As a Mahindra Fellow, she is working on a book about immigration policies of the Great Depression called “The Mexican Repatriation Program and Prolonged Consequences Across Three Generations.”“When we came together to study this space [the Mahindra Center], little did we know we would discover our family migration history,” she said.She and José joked that he took a sabbatical from construction to join her for the year at Harvard, where he can often be found in the archives, helping her photocopy documents.“I was giving a talk recently, and someone came to ask a question and he just turned around and answered the question,” she said. “The person said, ‘Oh, is he your research assistant?’ I said, ‘He’s my husband.’”Sonia’s husband, Marlon, stayed in Chicago to work and to maintain their home, and visits Sonia, and their son Elijah, 13, at Harvard every couple of weeks. Their daughter Angelina, 21, is finishing undergraduate studies at the University of Santa Cruz, California.“People always ask, ‘Your wife is what?’ I call myself the Ivy League plumber,” he said. “I have a library ID. I get to live the life of a college student without going to college.”Gomez, who got her Ph.D. at the University of Chicago, studies gender and immigration in the 20th century U.S. — specifically war brides like her grandmother, Michiko Ikeda, who came to the U.S. in the early 1950s. Gomez is interested in the ways gender and the institutions of marriage and family constructed specific roles for immigrant women.Gomez had her daughter during her senior year of high school in Palmdale, Calif. After going to beauty school, she worked as an aesthetician for 10 years.“I always wanted to go back to school, but life was happening,” she said. “I had a crisis at 26, and said to myself, ‘I have to go back now.’ I worked my butt off, went to Antelope Valley College, and transferred to UC Berkeley.” Relatedcenter_img Author accepts Mahindra Award, ponders concept of a mother tongue It is not lost on Ramírez how close her newly discovered relation feels to her scholarly material. “We talk about how immigration informs family formations,” she said, “but also creates family erasures.”The chance interweaving of long-lost cousins has also provided an extraordinary and poignant lens for the women, who said they sometimes experience imposter syndrome.“In a place that can be elitist, where women of color and immigrants are not overrepresented, you can feel lost,” said Ramírez. “But it’s through this sense of loss and a sense to create new beginnings that we’re here and able to support each other. To have this connection is very special.”Added Gomez: “Knowing Marla and our shared connection has made me feel at ease and comfortable. It sounds cheesy, but for a week I felt like this was a sign. We belong here.” The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

Sullivan family speaks about son’s death for first time

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first_imgIn the year since the accident that took the life of junior videographer Declan Sullivan, the University fell under the scrutiny of national media, was investigated by the state of Indiana and paid more than $40,000 in fines. But behind all of this was one family who spent the past year learning to cope with the loss of a son and brother in the best way they knew how: putting one foot in front of the other, one day at a time. “Bringing a child into the world, it’s a profound change in your life. Losing a child like this, it’s equally profound,” Sullivan’s father, Barry, said. “It’s not something you get over, it’s not something you put behind you. You do get used to it.” For the first time since the accident, the Sullivan family spoke to the media and said they do not blame the University for their son’s death. “We saw people who were in pain like we were in pain, but their’s was compounded by this sense of responsibility,” he said. “Any inclination that we might have felt quickly dissipated. They shared our sorrow.” Barry said his family has spent more time on Notre Dame’s campus in the year since Sullivan’s death than they had in any previous years. “I do remember thinking right after Declan died, ‘Will this be a sad place for us? Can we ever come back here and feel happy again?’ And I’m glad that we did,” he said. “They talk about the Notre Dame family, and we definitely feel a part of that.” Sullivan’s sister, Wyn, is a sophomore at Notre Dame and chose to stay at the University despite the loss of her brother. She came back to campus the Tuesday following her brother’s death, one day after his funeral, and returned to classes that Wednesday.. “A lot of people asked why I didn’t leave campus, but I feel like it almost would have been worse not being here,” she said. “If I’m having trouble, people understand. There’s a lot of support.” Wyn, who was a freshman at the time of the accident, said she cherishes the few months she shared with her brother at Notre Dame. “It helps me to remember him, being here and being in this atmosphere,” she said. “He wouldn’t have wanted me to leave.” For the Sullivan family, the most important result in the wake of Sullivan’s death was not pointing fingers, but rather making sure similar accidents do not happen again. As part of Notre Dame’s agreement with the Indiana Occupational Safety and Health Administration (IOSHA), the University started a campaign to raise awareness about scissor lift safety. Barry said his family was supportive of this venture and he contributed a video clip to the campaign to help raise awareness. Wyn said enforcing improved safety standards is more important than any monetary fines the University paid. “The University has so much money, it probably wasn’t a very big hit to them. But that’s not the important part to me,” she said. “As far as any monetary value, how can you put a value [on his life]?” While Notre Dame conducted an internal investigation into Sullivan’s death, negotiated with IOSHA and eventually came to an agreement, the Sullivans adjusted to a life where the dinner table is always missing a setting and the family is forever one member short. Wyn said when she thinks of her brother, she remembers goofy times they had — like when he tried on a female Santa costume or the year she and her younger brother, Mac, got Sullivan footsie pajamas for Christmas. “It was funny watching him run around the house in those,” she said. Wyn also said her family has grown closer and their outlook on life has changed in the year since Sullivan’s death. “As cliché as it sounds, living every moment to the fullest and making the most of the time that we have here, we keep that in better perspective than before,” she said. But on the one-year anniversary of Sullivan’s death, his parents and siblings will take a few moments to remember all that has occurred in the last year. Wyn will stay on campus, while Barry, and his wife Alison, will attend Mass at Old St. Patrick’s Church in Chicago, where they were married and Declan was baptized. “I think all of us are kind of taking a break away from our normal routine,” Barry said. “Just try to be together and put ourselves in a setting where we can reflect.” Wyn said she hopes the Notre Dame community will remember her brother’s originality, and strive to emulate his freedom of expression. “He didn’t care what anyone else thought, he was just going to be himself. Some people can never do that,” she said. “So I think being able to do that and kind of remind the student body about embracing their inner self and letting their personality actually come through is really important.”last_img read more

Odds & Ends: Obama Makes a Normal Call to Ryan Murphy & More

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first_img Disney is Planning a Lion King Sequel The hit movie was released 20 years ago and the Tony-winning musical is Broadway’s fourth longest-running show, so it’s no big surprise that Disney is planning a Lion King follow-up. According to TVLine, Disney Junior has a TV movie and series in the works called The Lion Guard, which will feature special guest star appearances from fan favorites such as Timon, Pumbaa, Rafiki, Zazu, Mufasa and Kiara. Next stop the Great White Way? Obama Calls The Normal Heart’s Ryan Murphy President Obama is a fan of Glee creator Ryan Murphy’s work. No, not for Lea Michele’s perky performance as Rachel Berry, but for Murphy’s recent HBO movie The Normal Heart. Deadline reports that the world’s most powerful man called Murphy on June 9 to tell him how moved he was by the film, adapted from Larry Kramer’s Tony-winning play about the beginning of the HIV-AIDS crisis. View Comments Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. Clint Eastwood Talks Behind the Jersey Boys Scenes Cint Eastwood appeared on The Tonight Show on June 9 to talk helming the Jersey Boys film adaptation, which you can find in a movie theater near you from June 20. Check out below the movie legend talking everything from Christopher Walken’s unique approach to, well, everything, to host Jimmy Fallon’s attempt at a Jersey accent.last_img read more

Sheridan Smith Exits Funny Girl Due to ‘Stress’

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first_img View Comments After much speculation in the British media, Sheridan Smith has taken a two to four week break from the London revival of Funny Girl due to “stress and exhaustion.” Natasha J. Barnes will take on the role of Fanny Brice at the West End’s Savoy Theatre in her absence. Directed by Tony winner Michael Mayer, with a revised book by Tony winner Harvey Fierstein, two-time Olivier winner Smith had received acclaim for her performance and there had been murmurings of a Broadway transfer.The tuner, which catapulted Barbra Streisand to stardom on stage and screen, first played London in 1966. Funny Girl tracks the rise of Fanny Brice’s career as one of Broadway’s biggest stars by way of the Ziegfeld Follies, as well as her doomed romance with Nicky Arnstein. The score by Jule Styne and Bob Merrill features such iconic show tunes as “People,” “Don’t Rain on My Parade” and “I’m the Greatest Star” and a book by Isobel Lennart.The production originally started out at the Menier Chocolate Factory and also stars Darius Campbell as Nick Arnstein and Valda Aviks as Mrs. Meeker. Sheridan Smith in ‘Funny Girl'(Photo: Marc Brenner)last_img read more

Scatec Solar completes second 65MW PV project in Malaysia

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first_imgScatec Solar completes second 65MW PV project in Malaysia FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Compelo:Norwegian solar plants developer Scatec Solar and its partners have begun commercial operations of the 65MW Jasin solar plant in Malaysia.Scatec Solar said that this is the second of the three 65MW solar plants under completion by the company in Malaysia. The solar plant is located in the south-west of Peninsular Malaysia and is expected to generate about 94,000MWh of clean electricity per year, which will be enough to power more than 31,000 households, while avoiding about 70,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions per year.Scatec Solar CEO Raymond Carlsen said: “We are pleased to have reached commercial operation for the Jasin solar plant, doubling our assets in operation to 130 MW in Malaysia. South East Asia continues to be a key market for us, and we expect that the Government of Malaysia will maintain high ambitions for the deployment of renewable energy in the country.”In December 2016, the company entered the country’s large-scale solar energy market by partnering with local ITRAMAS-led consortium which signed three 21-year power purchase agreements (PPAs) with Tenaga Nasional Berhad (TNB), the country’s electricity utility. Through the partnership, three solar plants with 197MW will be realized, with a total investment of MYR 1.24bn ($293m).After connecting the solar project to the grid, Scatec Solar has 714MW in operation and another 941MW under construction.More: Scatec Solar begins commercial operations at 65MW Malaysian solar plantlast_img read more

Destination Adventure! Road Trip and Gear Giveaway

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first_imgThis contest is over. Rules and Regulations: Package must be redeemed within 1 year of winning date. Entries must be received by mail or through the www.blueridgeoutdoors.com contest sign-up page by 12:00 Midnight EST on August 15, 2018 – date subject to change. One entry per person. One winner per household. Sweepstakes open only to legal residents of the 48 contiguous United States and the District of Columbia, who are 18 years of age or older. Void wherever prohibited by law. Families and employees of Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine and participating sponsors are not eligible. No liability is assumed for lost, late, incomplete, inaccurate, non-delivered or misdirected mail, or misdirected e-mail, garbled, mis-transcribed, faulty or incomplete telephone transmissions, for technical hardware or software failures of any kind, lost or unavailable network connection, or failed, incomplete or delayed computer transmission or any human error which may occur in the receipt of processing of the entries in this Sweepstakes. By entering the sweepstakes, entrants agree that Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine and their promotional partners reserve the right to contact entrants multiple times with special information and offers. Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine reserves the right, at their sole discretion, to disqualify any individual who tampers with the entry process and to cancel, terminate, modify or suspend the Sweepstakes. Winners agree that Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine and participating sponsors, their subsidiaries, affiliates, agents and promotion agencies shall not be liable for injuries or losses of any kind resulting from acceptance of or use of prizes. No substitutions or redemption of cash, or transfer of prize permitted. Any taxes associated with winning any of the prizes detailed below will be paid by the winner. Winners agree to allow sponsors to use their name and pictures for purposes of promotion. Sponsors reserve the right to substitute a prize of equal or greater value. All Federal, State and local laws and regulations apply. Selection of winner will be chosen at random at the Blue Ridge Outdoors office on or before August 15, 2018 – date and time subject to change. Winners will be contacted by the information they provided in the contest sign-up field and have 7 days to claim their prize before another winner will be picked. Odds of winning will be determined by the total number of eligible entries received. One entry per person or two entries per person if partnership opt-in box above is checked. A two-night stay in a Fair Stone State Park Yurt in Patrick County where a gift basket of Patrick County made goodies will be waiting for you. The stay also includes a two-hour kayak/canoe rental.A two-night stay at the Claiborne House in Rocky Mount, an 1895 Queen Anne style bed and breakfast.Three gift certificates for food and coffee in Rocky Mount including:$25 to Whole Bean Coffee House$50 to Ippy’s Restaurant & Lounge$50 to Buddy’s BBQTwo tickets to the Harvester Performance Center.Enter to win below:center_img This summer, take a Virginia road trip on us…In conjunction with our annual Road Trips Issue, we’re giving away an incredible road trip through Franklin County and Patrick County Virginia. You’ll also win a gear pack from Gregory Packs and Native Eyewear.Your road trip includes…last_img read more

North Merrick Parkway Pedestrian Fatally Hit

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 56-year-old Shirley man was fatally hit by a minivan while walking on the Southern State Parkway in North Merrick on Monday morning.New York State police said Peter Perri was walking in the roadway when he was hit by an eastbound Honda Odyssey near exit 23 for Meadowbrook Road shortly after 6 a.m.The victim was pronounced dead at the scene. The driver, who was note charged, was treated for minor injuries at Nassau University Medical Center.The eastbound lanes of the parkway was closed for hours while investigators were on the scene. Troopers are continuing the investigation and ask any witnesses to call them 631-756-3300.last_img read more