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Warriors Profiles: Can Damian Jones be the big guy in the middle?

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first_imgThe road to the Warriors’ roster has been littered with injuries and G-League assignments for this young center. Find out why the team remains behind him nonetheless.(In case you missed them previously, here are the first installations of our ‘Game Faces’ feature, profiles on Jacob Evans, Jonas Jerebko and Quinn Cook. Dope images provided by Jose Carlos Fajardo)Damian JonesContract: 3 years $3,998,718 (Currently on a club option worth $2.3 million. The Warriors can extend a $3.4 million …last_img read more

The legacy of Albert Luthuli

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first_imgANC president from 1952 to 1967, and winner of the 1960 Nobel Peace Prize, Chief Albert Luthuli was the most respected African leader of his era. The Albert Luthuli Legacy Project keeps the story of Luthuli – and the millions of people he represented – alive for a generation of South Africans born into freedom.‘No true peace and progress can be secured in any country as long as there are others in that country denied full democratic rights and duties’ – Chief Albert John Luthuli (Photo: Wikipedia)Brand South Africa reporterPresident-General of the African National Congress from December 1952 until his death in 1967, and recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1960, Chief Albert John Luthuli was the most widely known and respected African leader of his era.Luthuli’s home in Stanger, KwaZulu-Natal, a meeting place for people linked to South Africa’s freedom struggle during the years of Luthuli’s banishment, was proclaimed a museum in August 2004.The opening marked the completion of the government-driven Albert Luthuli Legacy Project, which included the launch of an annual memorial lecture, and the unveiling of a bronze statue of Luthuli at the KwaDukuza Municipal Chambers, and of a memorial at the Groutville Congregational Church where Luthuli’s grave is located.The house that is now the Chief Albert Luthuli Museum was under constant police surveillance when Luthuli lived there.Although Luthuli had been banished to his home by the apartheid government, many people travelled there to seek his counsel – among them United States attorney-general Senator Robert Kennedy, who arrived by helicopter for an unofficial visit in 1966.The Order of Luthuli is South Africa’s highest award for contributions to democracy, human rights, justice and peace. See: South Africa’s national orders.Luthuli and his guest held a private discussion on a wooden bench that is still positioned under a tree outside the museum. The two men discussed the ANC’s vision of a united South Africa, and before leaving Kennedy gave the ANC leader a portable record player and recordings of speeches made by his brother, former US president JF Kennedy.The ventilation shafts running beneath the floorboards were once used to conceal documents. According to the Arts and Culture Department, during restoration work on the building, workers uncovered a number of papers dating from that historic era.A latecomer to politicsAccording to SA History Online, Luthuli – who preferred his Zulu name Mvumbi (“Continuous Rain”) to his Christian names Albert John – was a latecomer to politics, nearly 50 when he first assumed national political office.Born near Bulawayo in what was then Rhodesia (and is now Zimbabwe) in 1898, Luthuli was sent back to his family’s home at Groutville mission station in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa in 1908.After completing a teaching course at Edendale near Pietermaritzburg, Luthuli took up the running of a small primary school in the Natal uplands. At around the same time, he was confirmed in the Methodist Church and became a lay preacher.The language of the Bible and Christian principles “profoundly affected his political style and beliefs for the rest of his life”, SA History Online states in its biography.In 1920 Luthuli studied further, then took up a teaching post, at Adams College. In 1935 he agreed to accept the chieftaincy of Groutville reserve, and returned home to become an administrator of local tribal affairs for the next 17 years.Luthuli’s public support for the 1952 Defiance Campaign finally brought him into direct conflict with the South African government, who demanded he resign from the ANC and dismissed him from his post as chief when he refused to do so.In response, Luthuli issued “The Road to Freedom is via the Cross”, in which he condemned apartheid as degrading to all who are party to it and expressed both his belief in non-violence and an optimism that whites would sooner or later accept a shared society.“The notoriety gained by his dismissal, his eloquence, his unimpeachable character, and his demonstrated loyalty to the ANC all made Luthuli a natural candidate to succeed ANC President James Moroka”, SA History Online states in its biography.Luthuli was elected ANC president-general by a large majority in December 1952, winning re-election in 1955 and 1958.“Bans imposed in early 1953 and renewed in the following year prevented him from giving direction to the day-to-day activities of Congress”, SA History Online states, “but as a country-bred ‘man of the people’, combining the most inspiring qualities of Christian and traditional leadership, he provided a powerful symbol for an organisation struggling to rally mass support.”Between the end of 1957 and May 1959, during a lapse in restrictions on his movements, Luthuli made a number of highly publicised addresses to whites and mixed audiences, his polished speeches and balanced appeals for reason in race relations earning him the praise of many white South Africans.Six days after the Sharpeville emergency in 1960, Luthuli sought to rally Africans to resistance by publicly burning his pass in Pretoria and calling for a national day of mourning. On 30 March he was detained and held until August, when he was tried and given a six-month suspended sentence.‘How easy it would have been to hate’Awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1960, Luthuli was allowed to travel to Oslo to receive the award the following year.In his acceptance speech on 10 December 1961, Luthuli said: “It can only be on behalf of the people of South Africa, all the people of South Africa, especially the freedom-loving people, that I accept this award, that I acknowledge this honour. I accept it also as an honour not only to South Africa, but for the whole continent of Africa …“Quite long ago my forefathers extended a hand of friendship to people of Europe when they came to that continent. What has happened to the extension of that hand only history can say, and it is not time to speak about that here, but I would like to say, as I receive this prize of peace, that the hand of Africa was extended. It was a hand of friendship, if you read history.”In his Nobel lecture, delivered at the University of Oslo on the following day, Luthuli said: “How easy it would have been in South Africa for the natural feelings of resentment at white domination to have been turned into feelings of hatred and a desire for revenge against the white community.“Here, where every day, in every aspect of life every nonwhite comes up against the ubiquitous sign ‘Europeans Only’ and the equally ubiquitous policeman to enforce it – here it could well be expected that a racialism equal to that of their oppressors would flourish to counter the white arrogance toward blacks.“That it has not done so is no accident. It is because, deliberately and advisedly, African leadership for the past fifty years, with the inspiration of the African National Congress, which I had the honour to lead for the last decade or so until it was banned, had set itself steadfastly against racial vaingloriousness.“We know that in so doing we passed up opportunities for an easy demagogic appeal to the natural passions of a people denied freedom and liberty; we discarded the chance of an easy and expedient emotional appeal.“Our vision has always been that of a nonracial, democratic South Africa which upholds the rights of all who live in our country to remain there as full citizens, with equal rights and responsibilities with all others. For the consummation of this ideal we have laboured unflinchingly. We shall continue to labour unflinchingly.”At the end of his lecture, after much applause, Luthuli sang the African anthem, Nkosi sikelel’ iAfrika.On 21 July 1967, while taking a walk near his Natal home, Luthuli was killed, reportedly when he was struck by a train.Source: SA History OnlineWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Lords Test: Won’t regret missing out on ton if we win Test, says Indian opener Murali Vijay

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first_imgMurali VijayIndian opener Murali Vijay has said that he will not feel dejected on missing out on a century at Lord’s if his team goes onto win the second Test against England on Monday.Chasing 319 for victory, the hosts slumped to 105 for four at stumps on day four. This was after Vijay’s patient knock of 95 runs had guided his team to 342 in their second innings.”It is disappointing to miss the hundred but I will take it any day if we can win the Test match tomorrow,” said a smiling Vijay after the day’s play.”The game is very well placed and (Ravindra) Jadeja is spinning the ball well. The fast bowlers can help too because it is doing a lot for spinners because of footmarks on the pitch. It will be a fifth day pitch and it will have wear and tear,” he added.While Jadeja will have a prominent role to play as a bowler on the final day of the Test, he had a major say as a batsman in how things shaped up on the fourth day here.Jadeja struck his maiden Test fifty, scoring 66 runs overall and his 99-run partnership for the eight wicket with Bhuvneshwar Kumar came in a whirlwind manner to knock the wind out of England.”Jadeja really played well and that helped us gain momentum. Obviously Bhuvneshwar is hitting the ball really well in this series and that has put us in a good position,” said Vijay.When asked if the James Anderson incident in the first Test at Nottingham had inspired him, the batsman replied, “When Jadeja came into bat, I could feel the energy that he will do something special. His intent was very special. I was playing the anchor role but I got out and he capitalised on his intent. He is a fighter and he was showing it with his celebration on reaching the fifty as well.” .advertisementBut the ground work for this impactful innings was laid only by Vijay’s patient and calm knock. He faced 247 balls and struck 11 fours, building a 79-run partnership with skipper MS Dhoni and helped India get into a position of advantage.”They were bowling in an off-stump channel and the wicket was doing a bit, I just thought I will tire them out. If I get a good ball there isn’t much I can do about it. So I just focussed hard and batted.”The first hour of play here is very crucial, especially in this match it has been tough because the ball is moving around. I thought there are more attacking batsmen after me so I will just bat till the second new ball comes,” said Vijay.”I have waited for my chance and worked hard. I believed that I will get my turn and when I have got it, I have just grabbed it. In international cricket, you have to play your natural game because the game is unpredictable,” he added, reflecting on his recent success.The final question then remains is if India can go on to win their first overseas Test since 2011.”We are all pumped up to do something special, we are here to prove a point and win a game,” was Vijay’s reply.last_img read more

UK loneliness minister puts spotlight on issue Canada also needs to tackle

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first_imgVANCOUVER – The appointment of a minister of loneliness in the United Kingdom to tackle social isolation is an acknowledgment of a problem Canadian experts say needs to be addressed here as well.B.C.’s seniors’ advocate Isobel Mackenzie said whether government intervention is the right approach remains to be seen, but it at least highlights social isolation as an important issue that merits public discourse.“It’s getting the conversation going,” Mackenzie said. “It’s something a lot of people don’t think about who aren’t isolated and lonely. … They don’t think about the person who is not reaching out to them.”Andrew Wister, director of the gerontology research centre at Simon Fraser University in B.C., said studies have found about one in five Canadians experience some degree of loneliness or social isolation.Social isolation can have serious repercussions, including impacts on a person’s mental health and mortality, and Canada could learn from the U.K.’s approach in raising public discourse on the issue, he said.U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May announced Wednesday the creation of a ministerial lead on loneliness. It marks the government’s first step in implementing recommendations made by a commission that found rates of loneliness are “worryingly high” across all age groups.In addition to developing a strategy to address the issue, Britain’s new minister will work across government departments to identify and support solutions that are already working and collect data to monitor progress.Wister said a collaborative approach to addressing social isolation is important because of the wide range of factors contributing to the problem.A 2017 report by Canada’s National Seniors Council, which Wister chaired, identified people living alone or in remote communities, who identify as LGBTQ, have disabilities and experience poverty as higher-risk groups.Access to transportation is a barrier many seniors encounter, he said, as is the availability of other health and social services.Mackenzie said “unintended consequences” of modern life, including technology, are also isolating people.As services such as banking and grocery shopping move online, people are losing opportunities to connect with one another, she said.“We need to look at some of the decisions we are making as a society on how we are choosing to live that may be contributing over time to creating the circumstances that lead to loneliness and isolation —decisions like living in single-family homes in the suburbs, driving alone in cars, communicating through social media rather than in person,” she said.Loneliness and isolation are particularly acute among seniors over the age of 80 who experience additional challenges like the death of a spouse, Mackenzie said.A survey conducted by her office last year found that even seniors in residential care facilities in B.C. reported feeling some degree of loneliness, despite being surrounded by people.“Almost half of the people living in our care homes felt that they didn’t have a close friend or someone they could do things with,” Mackenzie said.Wister said the problem is a complex one to solve, but deserves time and attention.Reconnecting people with their communities can change lives by improving the health and well being of individuals and enriching the people around them, he said.—Follow @Givetash on Twitter.last_img read more