Tag Archives: 金鱼缸t台海选

Caherline kids star on Operation Transformation

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first_imgCheck out this amazing aerial video of the pupils and staff of a Limerick primary school forming a stick man shape – doing jumping jacks and keepy uppies.The 181 boys and girls and 15 staff of Caherline National School all took part in the display. It was filmed using a drone and directed by teacher Bridget Lambert. The school made the video for Operation Transformation‘s [email protected] which aired tonight at 8.30pm on RTÉ One.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Schools all around the country are doing 10 minutes of exercise at 10am on Friday 10 February to celebrate 10 years of Operation Transformation. Schools can download an exercise video at www.rte.ie/ot or they can decide on their own creative way to get moving like Caherline NS. Limerick National School named winner in Gala Gifts for school competition Advertisement Twitter TAGSCaherline National SchoolOperation Transformation Limerick Post Show | May 15th 2020 Facebook NewsEducationCaherline kids star on Operation TransformationBy Editor – February 9, 2017 1769 Previous articleBeyond the neon runesNext articleOpinion – They just did their jobs Editor Printcenter_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Email Linkedin Operation Transformation’s Dr Eddie to feature at Shannon Chamber Seminar Limerick Post Show | Operation Transformation Operation Transformation looking for five new leaders Austism Awareness Feel Good Story Caherline National School Limerick WhatsApplast_img read more

Dutch Navy’s Pelikaan to undergo mid-life electrical refit

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first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Dutch Navy’s support ship Pelikaan to undergo mid-life electrical refit navaltoday Dutch Navy’s support ship Pelikaan to undergo mid-life electrical refit View post tag: Alewijnse Marine May 25, 2020, by View post tag: Royal Netherlands Navycenter_img Equipment & technology Share this article Alewijnse Marine is undertaking the assessment for the upcoming electrical refit that will be an important part of the mid-life refit of the Royal Netherlands Navy’s logistic support vessel HNLMS Pelikaan (A804).Alewijnse was awarded the contract by Damen Shipyards Den Helder in August last year and commenced work in January. The work is being carried out in Den Helder and at Damen Shiprepair Harlingen.The 65.4-meter-long Zr.Ms. Pelikaan operates exclusively in the Caribbean region where she provides support to maritime security operations and, in times of disaster, humanitarian relief. The support ship is permanently based at Curaçao.Alewijnse’s scope of work during the refit project is said to be extensive. The company is responsible for total service provision for the electrical work, covering engineering, supply and installation of equipment, project coordination and commissioning of all on board electrical systems. This includes the installation of brand new telephone, radar, CCTV and alarm and monitoring systems (AMS).Alewijnse undertook the original electrical installation when the vessel was built at Damen Shipyards Galati in Romania in 2005. The company is expected to complete the new project on time, enabling the vessel to be back in the Caribbean in time for the Hurricane season.COVID-19 pandemicThe project has faced additional challenges as a result of the coronavirus crisis. Alewijnse’s contract manager Perry Eikelenboom explained: “The safety of our personnel and of all those working on location is our top priority during this project. Maintaining safe distances while working and minimising the number of people on location at any one time place pressure on the schedule, but are essential.”“Thankfully, we enjoy a close cooperation with the yard and, working together and following their robust safety measures, we manage to be both efficient and safe.”Related:Dutch Navy upgrades support vessel HNLMS Pelikaan View post tag: HNLMS Pelikaanlast_img read more

COVID-19 surveillance remains lacking in Indonesia

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first_imgIndonesia is in a race against time to contain the COVID-19 outbreak as patients overrun health facilities and medical workers are overwhelmed, but primary efforts to break the chain of transmission are still far from expected, epidemiologists say.Testing, tracing and isolation are key to containing COVID-19. But these measures remain weak in Indonesia, largely because of limited testing capacity, an insufficient number of COVID-19 tracers and people’s reluctance to open up to these workers.On Oct. 7, a total of 44,212 specimens from 32,167 people were tested, according to the Health Ministry. On the same day, the ministry recorded 142,213 suspected cases. No data is available on the number of probable cases. Suspected cases are those with acute respiratory illness who have recently traveled or been exposed to a confirmed case, while probable cases are suspected cases with severe symptoms clinically consistent with COVID-19.Both still have no laboratory evidence, but probable cases also include those with inconclusive test results.Indonesia currently has 376 laboratories with a combined testing capacity of around 40,000 specimens in a day.Masdalina Pane of the Indonesian Epidemiologists Association (PAEI) said that having a high number of suspected cases on the waiting list for diagnostic tests would definitely delay contact tracing, quarantine and treatment. She said health authorities should reduce testing turnaround times and deploy more tracers or use more volunteers for COVID-19 surveillance. “Having no conclusive diagnostic status is a big problem. But if the capacity of labs remains limited, [health authorities] should make priorities on who to be tested — preferably probable and suspected cases with severe symptoms and they should get the lab results within 24 hours,” she said on Wednesday.COVID-19 testing in Indonesia is at 70.13 percent of the World Health Organization (WHO) benchmark of one per 1,000 people per week, according to the government’s COVID-19 spokesman Wiku Adisasmito on Tuesday.Read also: Contact tracing the missing link in Indonesia’s battle with COVID-19On Thursday, Wiku said the main reasons why to date Indonesia had yet to meet the benchmark were the limited number of tracers and supporting facilities, difficulties in reaching out to all contacts due to Indonesia’s vast and scattered regions, as well as persistent COVID-19 stigma. Wiku called on local health authorities to strengthen the role of Puskesmas and the public to report to health authorities about their history of contact with confirmed or suspected cases.“We need the help of people to report their own history of contact with known cases,” he said.A WHO situation report on Indonesia, published on Oct. 1, reported that a survey of 259 surveillance workers in the country found that 65 percent of respondents said they were able to trace close contacts of more than 80 percent of confirmed cases.The report said, based on a focus group discussion with surveillance-related stakeholders held in East Java last month, the main issue that was still looming over contact tracing was the stigma surrounding COVID-19. Limited numbers of traces was another problem, the report said.Masdalina suggested authorities strengthen the role of community health centers (Puskesmas) as they are the most capable to perform tracing adequately.Puskesmas are the backbone of public health across the nation, particularly in remote areas. But as they struggle with a lack of tracers, Masdalina urged them to recruit local residents to help with tracing efforts.“Local communities usually have appointed their own health volunteers, who can be trained and help Puskesmas with contact tracing, rather than deploying people from nowhere and who have no basic knowledge on this,” she said.Indonesia currently has 376 laboratories with a combined testing capacity of around 40,000 specimens in a day. (JP/Swi Handono)Epidemiologist Dicky Budiman from Australia’s Griffith University said efficient reporting and data collecting of tracing results also matter much — otherwise, containment would fail and cases would continue to multiply.For many health surveillance workers in the country, tracing is laborious work, as 86 percent of the workers surveyed revealed they still used paper-based methods, while only 9 percent used locally developed applications, the WHO report said. The remaining 5 percent did not document the procedure.Maulidiya Muliawati, 23, a health volunteer at Puskesmas Grogol Petamburan in West Jakarta, said she was primarily assigned to promote health awareness. But lately she has been helping surveillance workers to input data due to a heavy workload in contact tracing.“It took me around 2.5 hours to input data from around 30 questionnaires into one platform,” she said recently, adding that the work for surveillance officers requires them to input data into at least five different platforms, including on a website and a spreadsheet.“It could be hundreds on busy days,” she added.Due to the manual work, the WHO report said “it is important to develop a national-level electronic system to uniformly monitor and evaluate contact tracing across the districts”.“There is no other way [to contain COVID-19] than improve testing and tracing capacity […] We could have found more [people infected with the virus] with a more effective process,” Dicky said.Topics :last_img read more

Eagles Host Quad Middle School Cross Country Meet

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first_imgThe Jac-Cen-Del junior high cross country teams ran in a four-way meet at home against Milan, St. Lawrence, and Sunman Dearborn on Thursday (8/22). The JCD girls’ team finished third. The JCD boys’ did not have a complete team and finished fourth. [email protected] of Eagles Coach Steve Narwold.last_img

Men’s basketball: No. 17 Badgers face tough road test against improved Minnesota team

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first_imgLast season was one to forget for the Minnesota men’s basketball team.Three players were suspended in February after a sexually explicit video was posted on social media, and a fourth was suspended on a sexual assault charge. On the court, the Gophers went 8-23 with just two wins in Big Ten play.But Minnesota (15-4, 2-3 Big Ten) surpassed that win total from last season by early December of this season, and the University of Wisconsin men’s basketball team will face a completely different program Saturday at Williams Arena in Minneapolis. Combined with the elimination of off-court issues and an overall improved team mindset, UW associate head coach Lamont Paris said he sees many differences in this year’s Gopher squad.“I feel like they share the ball maybe a little better,” Paris said. “Defensively, they’re a little more sound I think. I don’t know if the numbers back that up.”Men’s basketball: In a game of fouls, Koenig’s scoring spree lifted Badgers over WolverinesThe University of Wisconsin men’s basketball team’s win Tuesday over the University of Michigan was far from pretty, but it Read…The numbers do in fact corroborate Paris’ claim.Minnesota will enter its bout against Wisconsin (15-3, 4-1) leading the Big Ten in defensive field goal percentage, as opponents make just 37.9 percent of shots against them. They also lead the league in 3-point field percentage defense (28.4 percent), blocked shots (123) and defensive rebounding (29 per game).Junior guard Nate Mason leads Minnesota’s scoring efforts, averaging 13.9 points a game. Six-foot-eight freshman guard Amir Coffey, who’s been named Big Ten Freshman of the Week twice this season, contributes 11.9 points per game, and sophomore guard Dupree McBryer adds 11.7 points per game.“I think they’re grittier,” Paris said. “Their confidence is higher.”The pinnacle of the Gophers’ season thus far are two solid road wins against Purdue and Northwestern to start the new year. Since a Jan. 8 victory over Ohio State, they have lost two in a row away from home at the hands of Michigan State and Penn State.Despite this lull, redshirt sophomore forward, Ethan Happ, sees the Gophers as a dangerous team, especially at home.“Any team that’s on a losing streak is obviously looking to break it just like Ohio State was when they came in here,” Happ said. “We’re just going to handle business just like [facing] any other team.”Happ is in the middle of a solid second season, nearly averaging a double-double (12.8 points, 9.1 rebounds). The last three games, however, haven’t been pretty for Happ, who still leads the Badgers in field goal percentage (60.5). Against Purdue, Ohio State and Michigan – exposed to length and athleticism down low – Happ is shooting just 38.4 percent from the field (15-for-39).“I haven’t noticed anything different besides my own mistakes,” Happ said. “I’m not taking the first shot that’s available. I’m trying to work for the easiest shot. Usually I could take two dribbles and just do a jump hook, but as of late I’ve been worried about trying to get all the way to the rim.”Men’s basketball: No. 17 Wisconsin holds off fiesty Michigan 68-64Struggling teams are sometimes the toughest matchups, especially in college basketball, where anything can happen on any given night. The Read…Paris pointed out Happ excelled against Georgetown, which had two seven-footers, amassing 19 points and 15 total rebounds in that game. He said the Badgers will continue to feed the big man in spots he likes.“He’s finished at a high level around the basket,” Paris said. “Sometimes he’ll get in there too deep. I think that’s an advantage to a bigger guy.”As if stealing a win at the “Barnyard” against a vastly improved Minnesota team wasn’t a tall enough order with their starting five, the Badgers’ challenge may become even greater.Senior forward Vitto Brown is questionable for Saturday’s game, according to a report in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.Brown did not practice Thursday because of a lower-leg injury, a UW official told the Sentinel. Brown scored 13 points against Michigan Tuesday night and has started all 18 games this season.Come Saturday, it will be interesting to see how Happ navigates the defensively talented Minnesota squad. Game time is 3:30 p.m. and will be televised on the Big Ten Network.last_img read more