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Caherline kids star on Operation Transformation

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first_imgCheck out this amazing aerial video of the pupils and staff of a Limerick primary school forming a stick man shape – doing jumping jacks and keepy uppies.The 181 boys and girls and 15 staff of Caherline National School all took part in the display. It was filmed using a drone and directed by teacher Bridget Lambert. The school made the video for Operation Transformation‘s [email protected] which aired tonight at 8.30pm on RTÉ One.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Schools all around the country are doing 10 minutes of exercise at 10am on Friday 10 February to celebrate 10 years of Operation Transformation. Schools can download an exercise video at www.rte.ie/ot or they can decide on their own creative way to get moving like Caherline NS. Limerick National School named winner in Gala Gifts for school competition Advertisement Twitter TAGSCaherline National SchoolOperation Transformation Limerick Post Show | May 15th 2020 Facebook NewsEducationCaherline kids star on Operation TransformationBy Editor – February 9, 2017 1769 Previous articleBeyond the neon runesNext articleOpinion – They just did their jobs Editor Printcenter_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Email Linkedin Operation Transformation’s Dr Eddie to feature at Shannon Chamber Seminar Limerick Post Show | Operation Transformation Operation Transformation looking for five new leaders Austism Awareness Feel Good Story Caherline National School Limerick WhatsApplast_img read more

Arab spacecraft enters orbit around Mars in historic flight

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first_img Pinterest By Digital AIM Web Support – February 9, 2021 Facebook Arab spacecraft enters orbit around Mars in historic flight Emiratis celebrate after the Hope Probe enters Mars orbit as a part of Emirates Mars mission, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021. The spacecraft from the United Arab Emirates swung into orbit around Mars in a triumph for the Arab world’s first interplanetary mission. It is the first of three robotic explorers arriving at the red planet over the next week and a half. Twitter WhatsApp Pinterestcenter_img Local NewsWorld News WhatsApp Facebook Twitter TAGS  Previous articleOrb Health Unites with Bueno Healthcare to Drive Expanded Patient Access in Puerto RicoNext articleBarrett-Jackson to Offer Larry Winkler Collection, Filled with Spectacular Supercars, Customs, Motorcycles and Automobilia Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more

City Takes Small Bite Out of Tax Increase for 2014

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first_imgCity Council on Thursday introduced a 2014 municipal budget that calls for a 2.57 percent increase to local taxpayers.A vote on a final budget will be held after a public hearing on April 24.The owner of a (not-quite-median) $500,000 home in Ocean City would see an increase of $73 in municipal taxes this year if the budget were approved as is.That figure represents a small decrease from the 2.89 percent tax levy increase proposed in a preliminary budget released last month.While the city had to budget about an extra $25,ooo to cover overtime work during an exceptionally snowy winter and an extra $155,000 to cover expenses on a front-loaded five-year capital improvement plan, substantial savings on required pension contributions helped reduce the overall burden on taxpayers.The overall budget falls from $71.9 million in 2013 to $69.7 million in 2014, but the decrease comes from one-time items (such as a FEMA reimbursement in 2013) and not from a reduction in annual operating expenses.The municipal budget and a small library tax account for about 50 percent of a property owner’s tax bill. School taxes (see related story) and county taxes represent about 25 percent apiece.With 4,500 homes reassessed in the final stage of a multiyear program to bring assessed values in line with market values, Ocean City has about $135 million less property value to tax.That helped lead to a 3.8 percent increase in the tax rate to 40.06 cents on $100 of assessed value.The owner of a $500,000 home that was one of 4,500 that were reassessed by the city this year will likely pay less in taxes this year. On average, that home would be reassessed at about $40,000 less, and the owner would see a decrease of about $85 in municipal taxes.With a three-year, in-house program to reassess 17,000 properties in Ocean City now complete, tax rates should begin to stabilize, according to Finance Director Frank Donato.While the local tax levy increases by 2.57 percent to $44.8 million, Ocean City will be $432,000 under the state’s 2 percent tax levy cap, according to Donato. The tax cap formula includes exceptions in what is calculated.City Council voted unanimously to bank money from this year to establish a cap bank for the next two budget cycles.See more detail on the proposed Ocean City budget.__________Sign up for OCNJ Daily’s free newsletter“Like” us on Facebooklast_img read more

Number Of Residents Under Isolation, Quarantine Continue To Rise Locally

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first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Photo: CDCMAYVILLE – Public health officials in Chautauqua County say the number of residents under isolation or some type of quarantine continue to rise.During Thursday’s update, the Chautauqua County COVID-19 Response team reported there were no new positive tests today. Although, they say they are not aware of the exact number of tests awaiting results because tests are being performed at a variety of sites.So far, the county has recorded 53 negative lab reports.“The large number of negative results is a positive sign that community mitigation strategies are working,” officials said. “Your efforts are paying off, keep practicing social distancing and everyday precautions to decrease the spread of illness.” From the beginning, the county has said its goal is to identify new cases quickly and prevent or limit secondary exposures to ensure public health and safety.Public health nurses conduct epidemiologic investigations per public health standards and in conjunction with NYSDOH epidemiologists to determine who may have been exposed to an individual confirmed by lab testing to have COVID-19.“In all three of the confirmed cases in Chautauqua County to date, the individual and all household contacts were identified and ordered in mandatory quarantine and all proximal contacts were identified and ordered into precautionary quarantine,” said officials. “If a broader potential exposure would have been identified, it would have been publicized.”Isolation and quarantine orders by the public health director are as follows:Mandatory Quarantine*:         11*confirmed positive COVID-19 case or a household contact of a confirmed positive COVID-19 casePrecautionary Quarantine*:    25*travel history to CDC level 3 country or proximal contact of a confirmed case of COVID-19.Mandatory Isolation*:              46* symptomatic of COVID-19 and pending COVID-19 lab testNursing homes, long-term care facilities, local hospitals, the federally qualified health center, and local physician practices in Chautauqua County are active partners and have been taking steps to assess and improve their preparedness for responding to COVID-19.  Their comprehensive response plans include plans for:Rapid identification and management of ill residents and patientsConsiderations for visitors and staffSupplies and resourcesEducation and trainingSurge capacity for staffing and equipment and suppliesSick leave policiesThese critically important providers of healthcare services need your help.  It is imperative that everyone abide by their visitation restrictions. Avoid visiting those most at risk; call instead.“The ONLY way we can protect our community and healthcare system from becoming overwhelmed with illness as a result of the novel coronavirus is to avoid being exposed to the virus,” said officials. “People at high-risk for severe illness include people aged 65 years and older; in a nursing home or long-term care facility; with high risk conditions – diabetes, chronic heart /lung / renal disease; who are immunocompromised; who are pregnant.”Health officials ask the community to understand that our actions will help stop the spread of the virus.  Keep those most vulnerable safe.Cancel all group activitiesHave supplies and medications on hand to minimize going outTake everyday precautionsClean your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use hand sanitizer that contains as least 605 Alcohol if soap and water are not available.Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.Put distance between yourself and others – at least 6 feet.Cover coughs and sneezes with your elbow or a tissue. Throw the used tissue in the trash.Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces.Stay home if you are sickCall your healthcare provider if your symptoms (fever, shortness of breath, cough) worsenIndividuals with questions or concerns regarding Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) or travel related questions are encouraged to call the New York State Department of Health Coronavirus Hotline 24/7 at 1-888-364-3065.For locally-specific information, County residents may also contact the Chautauqua County Department of Health and Human Services at 1-866-604-6789 during normal business hours.last_img read more

Lessons learned from my first year coaching youth basketball

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first_imgMORE: SN’s latest March Madness projectionsI was 15 minutes into my first head-coaching experience, and in way over my head. How could that happen? After all, I’d had great mentors growing up and have spent my entire adult life covering successful college football and basketball coaches.Seriously, how hard could it be?It’s hard. The first step is admitting that. We live in Pickerington, Ohio, a hotbed for NFL and college basketball talent. All those stereotypes about youth sports — parents, coaches and, of course, the scoreboard — are part of the thin line between competitiveness and obsession. And they’re real.You learn from it, especially in those areas that occasionally go viral when it gets out of hand. I’m no expert after one season as a head coach, but here’s what I learned from my first season that’s worth sharing for those who want to coach.ScoreboardOur first- and second-grade basketball leagues do not keep score. It’s a good idea in practice, but it’s tough to execute every week.The kids know the score. The parents know the score. And yes, the coaches know the score. You can only tell kids “Don’t worry about the score” so many times, but if you don’t believe it, then how will they?I always tried to re-center it this way. Think about it.If you played youth, junior high or high school sports, how many scores of individual games do you remember that you played in? I remember two or three, tops.Everybody remembers wins and losses. Few people remember the actual score.Our team played well in some games and we ran into some teams where I’d rather not know what the final score was anyway. The ” losses” would eat at me more than my players, especially early in the season. That’s part of being being a competitor, but it can have a negative effect on the kids if you cannot get past that.Kids can sense frustration, and whenever this happened I’d think of Alabama coach Nick Saban. How many eyes roll every time he talks about an “internal scoreboard” after the Crimson Tide beats somebody by 50?Well, he’s the most successful college football coach of all time, and I’m not sure he knows that it works the other way, too.You can “win” and get worse. You can get “beat” and get better. The second I learned that, our team improved.Parents and coachesThe parents on our team included three principals, three teachers and a former coach. I could take the stance that “This is my team!” and create friction (which I’ve heard works when dealing with hover parents), or I could keep the parents involved.In my experience, the latter option was better.My wife ran the clock and made a few gift bags for the kids at Christmas (don’t tell the NCAA). Our assistant is a principal and a coach’s son. He was amazing. One parent told me he guarded Jim Jackson in high school. You can bet we had him help with rebounding drills in the next practice. If anybody has tips on how to get second-graders to rebound better, then send them my way.MORE: Looking at college basketball’s (un)luckiest teamsAny contribution should be welcome. One father, a track coach, said he knew nothing about basketball. It didn’t matter, because he knew kids. One of the mothers showed her kid how to fight over top of the screen.Another father, the one who had high school coaching experience, ended up on our bench. I wanted him there, too. He drew up sideline plays on timeouts. I didn’t even watch because I knew they’d work.Everybody wants their kid to succeed. So why not facilitate that with other parents?The same goes for the other coaches in the league. Instead of being combative, work with —  not against — the other coaches. Which leads to the next point:RefsThere’s a ref shortage at the high school level in the state of Ohio, and it’s easy to see why. Referees get blamed for everything, and it’s easy to go after them.I’m guilty of that. For example, double teams are illegal in our league, and in one game the referee didn’t call a player for sliding off his man and blocking our shots. I grew progressively angry — if you’ve seen the “Angry Bender” series, you know where that can lead.”Hey, can you call the double team?””Call … the … double … team!””Call the DOUBLE TEAM! Call the … “Picture that Will Ferrell skit where he tells the kid to get off the shed. Before I almost blurted out one of those magic words, however, that former coach told me, “You’re not going to get that call so you might as well stop. You’re only going to make him even more mad.”He was right. It was the best lesson ever. I stopped worrying about the double team, which they never called anyway, and coached the kids — who adjusted. After all, you can double team at the higher levels.If you spend half the game harping on officiating, the kids will use it as an excuse for their performance when something goes wrong.Don’t blame the refs. Instead, work with the refs (we had some good ones) and coach your players. Which leads to the next point. …Coaching your kidMy son, Grant, is my clone. We look alike. We act alike. We watch sports the same way. He has filled out better March Madness brackets than me the past three years. He would have won in 2017 if not for Luke Maye, and in 2018 if not for Donte DiVincenzo.Still, the line between father and coach is never easy to side-step around. Early in the season I was probably too demanding on Grant: I’d correct him more than the other kids. I knew he could take it, but it doesn’t make it right. I went out of my way to make sure I wasn’t showing some favoritism.That was the wrong approach, at least for Grant. In the second half of the season, I treated him the same as the other kids: “Go make shots. Go compete. Go have fun.” He was harder on himself than I ever was, and that’s the thing we’ll continue to work on together.MORE: Five storylines to dominate the end of the college basketball seasonWe also did things to make it special for us, too. Every Friday, we’d watch a basketball “30 for 30.” He learned more about the “Bad Boys” Pistons and the N.C. State national championship team. He knows who Lorenzo Charles is. That’s important to me.I tried to keep him off the scoreboard app a little more, too.Hey, I want to have the better bracket this year.The playersThere are so many different parenting philosophies when it comes to sports. Honestly, it’s hard to keep up. So I tried to talk to as many parents as possible, either before or after practice, to make sure the kids were handing the intensity. Try doing that in front of a bunch of teachers and principals: the ones who know how to do the best every day. It was intimidating.There were moments where the parents, coaches, kids and refs in our league weren’t at their best, especially when it comes to a nonexistent scoreboard.There were challenges for our team. We didn’t have all 10 of our players at the end of the season. One of our first-timers broke his ankle and couldn’t finish — but that kid showed up to cheer on his teammates the rest of the year. That was awesome.So were some of the kids across the league. Grant’s friends and some of his former teammates were scattered on the other teams. Those games were, naturally, the most competitive. I love watching those kids just as much. You want to see as many kids play next year as a possible. Pickerington has that figured out, even at this age.I asked one of our players who his favorite NBA player was.He said, “I don’t have a favorite player because I have a hoop in my driveway.”Greatest response ever. If that kid leads a 5-12 upset in the NCAA Tournament someday, I won’t be the least bit surprised. I’ll have it penciled in on my bracket.The best part? The kids got better throughout the season. In the last game, two kids who hadn’t scored a basket all season scored in the final minutes. One of the kids flexed and screamed (you have to let that go every once in a while). They were having fun, which is the thing you hear people say they want most but have trouble living out. That goes for the coaches, too.I’ll remember that last quarter a lot longer than the score in any of those games, that’s for sure. That was the end of the season. Sort of.On Monday night, Grant and I were watching Virginia and Syracuse. Kyle Guy was drilling a bunch of 3-pointers, and that’s when Grant looked at the clock. It was about that time. The first Monday evening practice was a challenge.You don’t know until you try to get second-graders to hold the basketball on a school night in the latest practice window available. The first few shots went in every possible direction. A few went in. A few more bounced off the rim. A few even missed the backboard. One nearly knocked my glasses off, and I wasn’t even facing in the direction of the shot. “Dad, I miss practice.””Yeah, I do too.”I wouldn’t have said that four months ago, but now I can’t wait for next year to learn some more.last_img read more