Tag Archives: 爱上海419新的连接

McCarthy willing to bide his time

by ,

first_img He has now joined up with his new team-mates for training ahead of Saturday’s Barclays Premier League clash with Chelsea but he is not expecting to go straight into the side. McCarthy said: “I have been away for internationals but I am happy to be back. “Hopefully I can play some part in the game but I need to wait and see. “It is going to be hard. I need to try to work hard on and off the pitch. “I have got real competition at the club. There are a lot of big names here and we have a big squad. If I need to bide my time, I will bide my time. “Hopefully I can go on and try to take my chance when I get it.” McCarthy’s move to Goodison – on the day Gareth Barry and Romelu Lukaku were also signed but Marouane Fellaini and Victor Anichebe left – reunited him with his former Wigan boss Roberto Martinez. Martinez signed McCarthy for Wigan for just £1.1million from Hamilton four years ago. He established himself as a fine top-flight prospect under the Spaniard and featured in last season’s FA Cup triumph. McCarthy said: “It is good to be reunited with the gaffer. “I loved my time at Wigan and I enjoyed my time there under Owen Coyle, but to get a chance to work under the gaffer again – it was a huge offer. “He is a very good manager. You can see how he likes to play football. It is always pleasing on the eye for people watching. “I enjoy passing the ball and getting on the ball and that is what the gaffer does. “Coming to such a huge club was also something I didn’t want to pass up. “As soon as I heard they were interested there was no looking back.” New Everton signing James McCarthy is prepared to wait for his chance to make an impact at Goodison Park. Press Association McCarthy joined the Toffees from Wigan in a deal worth an initial £13million in the frantic closing minutes of the summer transfer window last week. Since then the 22-year-old has been away on international duty with Ireland and has had little time to familiarise himself with his new surroundings. last_img read more

Kephart, Mulcahy win annual Kaufman 5K

by ,

first_img Bio Latest posts by Hugh Bowden (see all) ELLSWORTH — More than 200 runners and walkers — the largest field ever — turned out Saturday for the eighth annual Jerry Kaufman Memorial 5K Run/Walk and Fun Run held by the James Russell Wiggins Down East Family YMCA.Andrew Kephart, 30, of Ellsworth captured top honors, pulling away from the rest of the field and finishing in 17 minutes, 14.29 seconds.But 29-year-old Sarah Mulcahy of Baring Plantation turned in a superb performance as the first female to finish, placing second overall in 18:22.07.Chris Holt, 53, of Ellsworth placed third in 18:54.27, and Kassie Strout, 24, of Trenton was the women’s runner-up, finishing 16th overall in 21:28.52.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textMale and female age group winners in the 5K:10 and under – Caleb Hicks, 10, of Franklin in 23:26.12 and Sophie Torrance, 10, of Ellsworth in 36:01.96.11-19 – Evan Merchant, 13, of Beals in 20:37.58 and Marilyn Sawyer, 12, of Trenton in 29:55.76.20-29 – Nick Brown, 27, of Ellsworth, fifth overall in 19:24, and Veronica Wentworth, 25, of Franklin in 22:39.22.30-39 – Darren Winchenbach, 33, of Waldoboro, sixth overall in 19:36.41, and Laura Anderson, 38, of Bar Harbor in 22:06.52.40-49 – Adam Murphy, 40, of Hancock, seventh overall in 129:55.33, and Michelle Gagnon, 49, of Ellsworth in 23:14.05.50-59 – Michael Westphal, 57, of Cranberry Isles in 20:46.16 and Kristen Curtis, 55, of Steuben in 22:42.32.60-69 – Bob Ciano, 60, of Castine, fourth overall in 19:07.21, and Jane Ham, 67, of Ellsworth in 26:16.34.70 and over – Lloyd Harmon, 74, of Ellsworth in 25:56.19 and Gina Grogean, 73, of Surry in 52:00.72.Other top 10 finishers were James Perry Jr., 26, of Eastbrook, eighth in 19:55.39; Andy Pereira, 46, of Bass Harbor, ninth in 20:02.38; and Tobin Peacock, 41, of Lamoine, 10th in 20:03.17.Proceeds from the race, part of the Eden Athletics Race Series, go to support Hancock County HomeCare and Hospice. Is this the kind of government we deserve? – July 10, 2017 Hugh BowdenExecutive EditorHugh writes editorials, covers Hancock County sports and helps out where needed in The American’s editorial department. When he’s not on the sidelines, he enjoys playing jazz and tennis. [email protected]center_img Latest Posts Like he did in the ’60s, Noel Paul Stookey sings out in troubling times – December 27, 2017 GSA surges in 4th to win Northern Maine title – February 26, 2017last_img read more

Neymar vs Cavani: The Battle for Supremacy

by ,

first_imgThough Manager Unai Emery has told them to sort out the issue, it doesn’t seem like the situation has improved. Alarmingly for everyone associated with PSG, there are reports that in the dressing room after the match, things were close to getting physical between the South American pair.An altercation between the two took place, with Cavani unhappy with the way Neymar conducted himself. Captain Thiago Silva was said to have intervened to defuse the tension.While both players along with Kylian Mbappe, have developed a strong understanding and formed a fearsome attacking trio that has scored 16 goals so far this term, the dispute is a major cause for concern and doesn’t exactly bode well for team spirit.In a classic case of modern football, it soon came to light that Neymar has unfollowed Cavani on Instagram as a result of the disagreement, while after the game, the former Napoli man made a decision to rush out of the Parc des Princes and avoid what would have been intense questions from journalists in the mixed zone about the incident.The Brazil superstar now wants to win the Ballon d’Or after leaving Barcelona. When Neymar joined Barcelona in 2013, Johan Cruyff could see trouble ahead. “I wouldn’t put two captains on the same boat,” he said referring to the Brazilian joining the same team as Lionel Messi. “You have to learn from the past on this one.”For once, the great man was wrong. Neymar and Messi got on well that they both paid gushing tributes to each other when they parted company this summer.However, it’s unlikely to be that way when Cavani inevitably leaves Paris Saint-Germain – Neymar has already stopped following him on Twitter and he passed to him just twice in the weekend game against Lyon. Cavani didn’t pass to Neymar at all, and by all accounts went for him in the dressing room after the game.There are two differences between PSG in 2017 and Barcelona in 2013: Cavani is not Messi, and the Neymar of four years ago is not the Neymar of now.Messi can be as self-centred as the next superstar but it’s also true that by genius standards, he has a remarkably underdeveloped ego, and Neymar benefited from that.At the end of the 2014-15 season, Barcelona were thrashing Cordoba 6-0 and Messi, on a hat-trick, let Neymar take a penalty because the Brazilian hadn’t scored yet. It was typical of his attitude during their four seasons playing together.Whenever they played weak opposition, Messi, Neymar and Luis Suarez would make an effort to ensure all three get on the scoresheet. In closer, more difficult games when Messi felt that his aim was off and that Neymar was turning everything he touched into gold, then he would step aside and let the Brazilian be the protagonist.In last season’s comeback against PSG at the Nou Camp it wouldn’t have entered Messi’s head to push Neymar to one side for that late free-kick and even later penalty.Neymar was also very keen to show that he had not come to rip Messi’s crown off his head even though succession was his long-term idea.On the day of his presentation, he said, “I’ve never worried about being the best in the world. The best is already here and he’s Messi, who cannot be compared with anybody. I am one of the luckiest men in the world to be able to play alongside him and learn from him. I have come to help him stay as the best and to win many more trophies.” It may well have been as premeditated and scripted as his speech in Catalan that day but it played out just as he said he wanted it to. Messi stayed No 1 and Neymar helped him.Clearly, he has not gone to PSG to help Cavani remain the main man at the Parc des Princes. The Uruguayan is perhaps the bigger fool for not realising that if the £198 million man wants to take the half-time team talks as well as all the free-kicks and penalties, he is going to be allowed to.And there is one more big difference between PSG and Barcelona. At Barca, Neymar had his band of brothers off the pitch, at PSG he has one on the pitch too.In Spain, the so-called “Toiss” never left Neymar’s side. This group of friends from Brazil was with him from his presentation in 2013 to his last day in Barcelona when they all went to get tattoos in the city – each one got a letter tattooed on to his wrist that when the group stand together and put their arms out spells “amigos.”Several “Toiss” even went on the club flight to the US for the pre-season tour, much to the annoyance of some of the club’s directors – especially the ones who knew Neymar was going to leave the club before the season started.Despite the social entourage, on the pitch he was increasingly isolated. He stayed with friends like Messi and Suarez but the Brazilian quota in the squad seemed to go down every year and he was left sitting next to reserve team right back, Douglas, on flights to games.He wanted Brazilian players brought to the club and the signings of Philippe Coutinho and Paulinho were both linedup with his desire to have his own gang very much in mind.Barca followed through on Paulinho, and tried to get Coutinho, despite Neymar’s departure.At PSG, he has Marquinhos, Lucas Moura, Thiago Silva and Dani Alves. He doesn’t have to take the ball off Cavani because Alves will do it for him.He’s the prince of Paris now; he has his court, his royal protector in the shape of club president, Nasser Al Khelaifi, and unless Cavani starts playing like Messi, he has little choice but to dance to Neymar’s tune.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Neymar’s record £200 million move from Barcelona to Paris Saint-Germain will be topical for a long time, to establish himself as the Prince of Parc des Princes, which  have pitched him against Edinson Cavani. Kunle Adewale reportsW ith four goals and four assists in three league matches, Neymar has so far lived up to expectation of  fans that troop out  to the Parc des Princes every weekend to watch the most expensive footballer in the world. Last Sunday, against Olympique Lyonnais, a side that has yet to taste defeat in the Ligue 1 six-week old league, football analysts felt it was the real test for PSG and indeed Neymar and they were not disappointed as the match lived up to expectations, but not without controversies with Neymar and Edinson Cavani trying to establish themselves as to who really is in charge at Parc des Princes.Before the arrival of the golden boy of Brazilian football, Cavani was the undisputed penalty taker, but Neymar was ready to prove that he has come to take charge. The two argued over who should take a penalty in their toughest test of the season so far against Lyon, with PSG maintaining their perfect start to the season with a 2-0 win – though it wasn’t their most convincing performance and both goals came from Lyon players as Marcelo and Jeremy Morel deflected shots from Cavani and Mbappe late on.The main talking point was the squabble between Cavani and Neymar, who for the second time in his stint in Paris, attempted to take a penalty. He was unsuccessful again, as Cavani took charge his effort was saved by Anthony Lopes.There was also an incident where Cavani wanted to take a free-kick and Dani Alves nabbed the ball off him, and gave it to Neymar.last_img read more

Calling Something a Whale Doesn’t Make It a Whale

by ,

first_imgAnother popular article was more accurate and did not call it a whale or a Protocetidae but an “unknown species of animal.”[3] Claiming this animal was a whale is worse than claiming a dog is a cat. It is rather more like claiming a dog looks like a crocodile. The illustrations used to publicize the creature show a large doglike body and a crocodile-like head that contains the brain, head and mandible. Plus, it has a crocodile-like tail. So what is the more absurd comparison? Although shown swimming in the water, it had four legs and could navigate on land as well as any other land mammal. The problem is, “Whales look so unlike other mammals that it’s hard to imagine the type of creature that they evolved from.”[4]Example of media hype over this fossil.Dogs Evolved into Whales?The reports on the Peregocetus pacificus discovery claim the “ancestors of modern whales and dolphins evolved from a small, four-limbed hoofed animal living in south Asia that looked very much like a dog.” They actually think the ancestor could well have been related to an ancient dog. In the words of LePage, “Whales started evolving in South Asia around 50 million years ago from a dog-like creature related to deer and hippos.”[5]Genetically, the molecular evidence shows whales’ closest living relatives are the artiodactyls. These are hoofed mammals that include cows, sheep, pigs, deer, giraffes, camels, and hippos. The dog-to-whale evolution theory claims that the hoofs of the dog-like ancestor evolved into flippers. Likewise, hundreds of other body parts had to evolve into other structures to get a whale out of a dog. So many changes would have been required to go from some type of dog to a whale that it would seem better to start over. Anyone who has attempted to renovate and modernize a house built in the 1800s will understand this.Darwinists teach that as whales “became more aquatic, these early whales began spreading along coasts.”[6] Eventually they made it to Peru where the discovery of Peregocetus pacificus was made (7 April 2019). This very unlikely scenario from-dog-to-whale evolution was selected because no other known animal has even a close possibility of being a whale ancestor. Various just-so-stories made up about whale evolution have been proposed, but all were soon rejected. Famously, Darwin thought the ancestor was a bear! He wrote, “I can see no difficulty in a race of bears being rendered, by natural selection, more and more aquatic in their structure and habits, with larger and larger mouths, till a creature was produced as monstrous as a whale.”[7] Well, he should have seen lots of difficulties. When scientists contemporary to Darwin mocked this claim—and many did—Darwin removed it from subsequent editions of his book, but privately defended it.[8] He admitted his bear-to-whale hypothesishas been well laughed at, and disingenuously distorted by some into my saying that a bear could be converted into a whale …. As it offended persons, I struck it out in the second edition; but I still maintain that there is no especial difficulty in a bear’s mouth being enlarged to any degree useful to its changing habits—no more difficulty than man has found in increasing the crop of the pigeon, by continued selection, until it is literally as big as the whole rest of the body.”[9]Credit: Brett MillerDarwin’s speculation that whales evolved from bears is, ironically, not far from the modern just-so-story of whale evolution! If the earliest whale ancestor was claimed to be the ancestor of wolves, this story is still proposed by Darwinists.Speaking of wolves, all the Darwinists can say about wolves is that they evolved “from carnivores (meat-eaters) … canids (which include wolves, dogs, and the felids [cats and their relatives]) around 20 million years ago.”[10] One could tell a just-so-story that cats and dogs have some common ancestor which was some type of carnivore. The major question is, which carnivore was it? And what animal did that carnivore evolve from? Some other animal, but which one? And which common ancestor evolved into a whale? Guesses exist, but no evidence. Yet some look to this as the best case. The “flood of new fossils has filled in the gaps in our knowledge to turn the origin of whales into one of the best-documented examples of large-scale evolutionary change in the fossil record.”[11] This statement says less about whale evolution than it says about the pathetic fossil record for most other animals.What is Peregocetus? My guess is the creature found has nothing to do with whale evolution, but is yet another example of an extinct animal similar to those already found. The Peregocetus family fossil record shows no evidence of having evolved from something else, nor evidence that it has evolved into something else. It is part of an extinct animal kind – nothing more.Whales were first classified as mammals only in 1693 by the famous creation-affirming naturalist John Ray, a Bible-believing Christian. Although the Pakicetus family had a few minor aquatic characteristics, most of its traits were very different from whales as is also true of the Peregocetus pacificus. Converting a land tetrapod to a fish-like mammal would demand thousands of major structural changes. As with any animal, all of its body systems are interrelated and function as a coherent unit. Evolutionary transformation into another kind of animal would require altering the complete set of complex interrelationships in entire biological systems. Both size and structural changes would be necessary for a large dog-sized tetrapod animal to evolve into a whale. Consider that a humpback whale is larger and heavier than a city bus! A few examples of the transformations required will now be summarized.LocomotionLeg changes required for a dog to evolve into a whale include the front legs becoming shorter and shorter until they are replaced by flippers. When its front legs are halfway between ordinary legs with feet and flippers, this mutated creature would be at a tremendous disadvantage, both while on land and in the water. In this stage of its claimed evolution, it could neither swim nor walk very well, or if it was able to manage some movement on land, it would at best be terribly awkward. When in the water, it could not swim with front flippers that were partly feet, and with a tail that was only a partial fluke. Why this change would occur is unexplainable, especially due to the fact its intermediate stages would severely compromise its ability to hunt and live.ScaleThe body size changes required to evolve from the small terrestrial mammal proposed by evolutionists as the precursor of whales to a marine whale are enormous—from a less than 50-pound dog-sized terrestrial animal to up to a 150-ton sea animal, and from a few feet long to up to a 100-foot-long animal. The tongue of a blue whale alone weighs as much as an elephant. These changes require not only size modifications, but major design changes in every body organ, structure, and system.Illustration courtesy Illustra Media.EnvironmentThe body must also be streamlined to flow in the water like a shark, animals they closely resemble in shape but not in size. Many whales can travel at enormous speeds in spite of their enormous body size. The speed record is held by the killer whale, which can travel as fast as 34 mph (55 kilometers per hour), faster than any other sea mammal. To achieve this speed, they possess huge muscle blocks that carry some whales as far as from Alaska to Mexico to mate and back to Alaska. This trip involves more than 12,000 miles (20,000 km).[13]ReproductionReproduction is another major problem. Do females at this stage of evolution from land to water have their offspring on the land or in the water? If she had her calves in the water, how does she keep them from drowning? And how does she nurse them until she evolved all the complex systems required to nurse under water? The idea that a hairy, four-legged mammal gradually changed into a whale during millions of years is irrational. Illustra Media’s film Living Waters also discusses the insuperable difficulties of evolving the male’s reproductive organs from outside to inside the body.Skeleton, Diet and RespirationOne study of Pakicetus’s anklebones determined it did have many similarities to artiodactyls, not whales.[14] Moreover, the teeth of the Pakicetus wolf-sized land animal “closely resemble those of land-dwelling mesonychids—so closely that paleontologists . . . had always regarded such teeth as belonging to mesonychids until they found the jaws those teeth came from.”[15] Then they had to revise their theory. In contrast to the whale diet of fish, the teeth of Pakicetus were probably used to feed on carrion, mollusks, or tough vegetable matter. Pakicetidae nostrils were also located in a very different place than where a modern whale blowhole is located, Rather they were in the same place as a dog’s nostrils.[16]ConclusionAs is obvious from this brief review, the problem of dog to whale evolution is beyond enormous. It is scientifically untenable, as I document in my new book on whale evolution which I hope will go to press this year.[1] Lambert, Olivier, et al., 2019. “An Amphibious Whale from the Middle Eocene of Peru Reveals Early South Pacific Dispersal of Quadrupedal Cetaceans.” Current Biology 29:1–8 April 22, Elsevier Ltd. p. 1.[2] Black, Riley. 2010. “How Did Whales Evolve?” Smithsonian Magazine, December 1st. [3] Dvorsky, George. 2019. Unknown Species of Ancient Four-Legged Whale Uncovered in Peru. Gizmodo.[4] Yong, Ed. 2010. “Whales evolved from small aquatic hoofed ancestors.” Discover Magazine.[5] Le Page, Michael. 2019. “Amazing four-legged fossil shows how walking whales learned to swim.” New Scientist.[6] LePage 2019.[7] Darwin, Charles. 1859. The Origin of Species. John Murray, London, p. 184.[8] Darwin, Francis and N. C. Seward (Editors). 1903. More Letters of Charles Darwin. London: John Murray.[9] Darwin, Francis and N. C. Seward (editors), 1903, Letter 1860.[10] Resnick, 1999, p. 6,[11] Black, 2010.[12] Dvorsky, 2009.[13] Papastavrou, Vassili. 2004. Eyewitness Whale. New York: DK Publishing.[14] Thewissen, J.G.M. Hans, E.M. Williams, L.J. Roe and S.T. Hussain. 2001. “Skeletons of Terrestrial Cetaceans and the Relationship of Whales to Artiodactyls.” Nature, 413:277-281.[15]Parsons, Keith.  2004.  The Great Dinosaur Controversy: A Guide to the Debates. ABC-CLIO, Santa Barbara, CA., p. 160.[16] Gingerich, P.D. 2003.  “Land-To-Sea Transition in Early Whales: Evolution of Eocene Archaeoceti (Cetacea) in Relation to Skeletal Proportions and Locomotion of Living Semiaquatic Mammals.”  Paleobiology, 29(3):429-454, Summer. Solid lines indicate actual bones found. Dotted lines are inferred. Locomotory behaviors are also inferred. This absurdly hyped fossil is a WINO— Whale in Name Only. Dr Jerry Bergman gives it a reality check. On Calling a Creature Very Unlike a Whale a Whale by Jerry Bergman, PhDGiven the title of a paper in a peer reviewed scientific journal, “An Amphibious Whale from the Middle Eocene of Peru Reveals Early South Pacific Dispersal of Quadrupedal Cetaceans,” one would assume the researchers discovered a whale. Actually, it was a very non-whale creature the authors assumed was on its way to evolving into a whale! The article classifies it as a Protocetid (“first whale”),[1] and, judging solely by the drawings of the animal in the flesh, it looks very much like another extinct non-whale animal called a Pakicetidae. Also judging by the drawings of the skeleton, the skeleton looks very much like a dinosaur. Not surprisingly, whale bones were once often mistaken for dinosaur fossils.[2]Peregocetus pacificus (“the traveling whale that reached the Pacific”) was the name given to the “whale” fossil. It is a “remarkably well-preserved” four foot long, fairly complete animal, the discoverers say. The fossil includes its jaw, front and hind legs, bits of its spine, and most of its tail.[12] The fossil was found in 2011 at a site called Playa Media Luna and is the first ostensible “whale” found in Peru. Due to possessing characteristics similar to modern otters and beavers, this mammal was apparently well-adapted to both land and water.center_img Dr. Jerry Bergman has taught biology, genetics, chemistry, biochemistry, anthropology, geology, and microbiology at several colleges and universities including for over 40 years at Bowling Green State University, Medical College of Ohio where he was a research associate in experimental pathology, and The University of Toledo. He is a graduate of the Medical College of Ohio, Wayne State University in Detroit, the University of Toledo, and Bowling Green State University. He has over 1,300 publications in 12 languages and 40 books and monographs. His books and textbooks that include chapters that he authored, are in over 1,500 college libraries in 27 countries. So far over 80,000 copies of the 40 books and monographs that he has authored or co-authored are in print. For more articles by Dr Bergman, see his Author Profile.(Visited 582 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more