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Anglican Alliance releases resources for observing Freedom Sunday in December

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first_img [Anglican Communion News Service] Churches throughout the Anglican Communion are expected to observe Freedom Sunday on or near Dec. 2 as part of increased efforts to tackle human trafficking and modern slavery. The Anglican Alliance has produced a resource pack, in English, Spanish, French and Portuguese, to help churches plan services and other events around Freedom Sunday, which this year falls on the UN’s International Day for the Abolition of Slavery. The resource pack includes stories, information, prayers and a sermon outline.Read the full article here. Posted Nov 10, 2017 Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Advocacy Peace & Justice, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Anglican Alliance releases resources for observing Freedom Sunday in December TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Anglican Communion, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Human Trafficking Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more

University of Limerick host its 10th annual Women’s Day conference

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first_imgMunster secure golfing victory in Vilamoura Linkedin Advertisement Twitter Limerick school surprised with wild card for Junk Kouture finals Email Singles Stableford qualifier for Hunt Museum’s Pro-Am team Print Facebook BNest creates social impact with Limerick entrepreneurs center_img Previous articleFinal call for Limerick primary schools to enter 2018 Our World Irish Aid AwardsNext articleBank of Ireland celebrate International Women’s Day with an exciting announcement Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie News in briefs and round-ups RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsUniversity of Limerick host its 10th annual Women’s Day conferenceBy Staff Reporter – March 8, 2018 1982 Limerick students bag a spot in Junk Kouture finals TAGS#PressforProgressBank of IrelandBrenda RomeroBrid HoranDavid WallaceDELL EMCNorthern TrustSTEMstudentsUniversity of LimerickWiSTEM2D The main building at the University of LimerickUniversity of Limerick  hosted its 10th annual International Women’s Day conference today. The conference entitled #PressforProgress was supported by Northern Trust, Johnson & Johnson, Dell EMC and Bank of Ireland and was attended by members of the Mid-West business and education community.The conference was chaired by Brid Horan, former Deputy CEO of ESB and a member of the steering committee and former chair of the 30% Club, formed in 2015 with a goal to achieve better gender balance at all levels in leading Irish businesses.Contributors from across industry and academia discussed the topic of Women Pressing for Progress.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up UL lecturer Brenda Romero, a BAFTA award-winning game designer, artist and Fulbright scholar spoke about her experience since she entered the video game industry in 1981. As a designer, she has worked on 47 games and contributed to many seminal titles, including the Wizardry and Jagged Alliance series and titles in the Ghost Recon, Dungeons & Dragons and Def Jam franchises.Further discussion focused on the challenges facing Women in STEM.Marie Connolly, Head of Equality and Diversity, University of Limerick said “UL is delighted to be celebrating the 10th year of its Annual International Women’s Day Conference in collaboration with industry partners, Northern Trust, Johnson & Johnson, Bank of Ireland, Maples and DellEMC who have been partnering with us on the conference and gender projects for many years.Also at the conference, Ian Headon, Senior Vice President of Northern Trust interviewed former Ireland rugby international David Wallace who is also Regional Business Development Manager at Bank of Ireland.A number of second and third year UL students participating in the WiSTEM2D programme were presented with awards at the event. The WiSTEM2D: Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, Manufacturing, and Design (STEM2D) programme was established by Johnson & Johnson in 2015 with the aim of providing additional support at undergraduate level and encouraging women into exciting STEM careers.A total of 20 students from science, technology, engineering, maths, manufacturing, and design courses were selected to participate. As part of the programme, these students met at workshops where they discussed their experiences as women pursuing a career in STEM, listened to female STEM role models and engaged in projects that aimed to challenge STEM stereotypes.The students worked in groups to produce five videos that aimed to specifically target stereotypes in design, engineering, biology, technology and chemistry.University of Limerick also hosted other International Women’s Day events, including the Synthesis and Solid State Pharmaceutical Centre’s launch of Women in SSPC, WiSSPC. WiSSPC is a networking and developing initiative designed to accelerate female professional development in SSPC. Chaired by Professor Michael Zaworotko, SSPC director, keynote speaker was Domhnait Gleeson of Science Foundation Ireland.More about education here. WhatsApplast_img read more

Angeliki E. Laiou

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first_imgAngeliki E. Laiou, Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Byzantine History at Harvard, was one of the world’s leading historians of the Byzantine Empire–the successor of the Roman Empire in the Middle East—and of the Crusades. Celebrated for her path-breaking research in Mediterranean economic and women’s history, in 1985 the sole female permanent member of the Department of History pioneered as the first female chair. Born in Athens, Laiou played major roles in the culture and politics of her native land, as Deputy Secretary of Foreign Affairs of the Hellenic Republic (2000) and as a Socialist Member of Parliament. Her career as a historian, diplomat, and educator spanned the continents.Educated at the University of Athens, Brandeis (B.A., 1961), and Harvard (M.A., 1962; Ph.D., 1966), Laiou served as an Instructor and Assistant Professor at Harvard before moving to Brandeis and then to Rutgers, where she rose to Distinguished Professor. In 1981 she returned to Harvard, where she taught the history of Byzantium, the Crusades—her commanding presence, penetrating mind, and ferocious dedication to her teaching and her students made her Core course on this topic ever popular among the undergraduates—and Balkan history. She was a faithful affiliate of Lowell House.Fourteen monographs and edited books began with a rigorous study of the late Byzantine Empire’s complex foreign policy among the predatory Italian commercial empires of Venice and Genoa. An acute sense of social justice perhaps helped lead her to the next monograph, a highly innovative demographic study of late Byzantine peasant society.Discoveries in the conditions of peasant households and her passionately intellectual engagement in the modern world led to one of her great themes: sex, marriage, and the status of women in Byzantine society. Three path-breaking books on this topic feature methodological rigor, sovereign command of medieval and modern languages, and an unfailingly analytical eye allied with an imaginative but hard-nosed approach to the evidence and the realities it implied. The prize-winning Mariage, amour et parenté à Byzance (1992) derived from the lectures Laiou delivered in impeccable French at France’s supreme academic institution, the Collège de France. The conference she inspired and edited about Consent and Coercion to Sex and Marriage in Ancient and Medieval Societies (1993) put that subject on the scholarly map.  With her friend Hélène Ahrweiler, president of the Sorbonne, she prepared a remarkable multi-authored work on geographic mobility, migration, and diaspora in the medieval Greek experience.Her career culminated in the massively definitive three volumes of the Economic History of Byzantium for which she recruited the world’s leading specialists and wrote eight of the finest chapters. A benchmark for all future research, this work innovated by being freely available online. Her most recent book, coauthored with her friend the Parisian numismatist Cécile Morrisson, offers a brilliant synoptic view of the Byzantine economy that goes far beyond summarizing the great work.Laiou’s diplomatic service entailed fostering better cultural and intellectual relations with Greece’s ancient enemy, an engagement that has no better incarnation than her dedication to her beloved Turkish graduate students. In the end, and to her colleagues’ delight, she happily returned to full-time duty at Harvard in 2001.Decorated as a Commander of the Order of Honor of the Hellenic Republic, Laiou was only the second woman selected as a permanent member of the Academy of Athens since the Academy’s founding. Among many honors, she held two Guggenheims; was a Fellow of the Medieval Academy of America and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; was a member of the Academia Europaea; and was a Corresponding Member of the Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres (Paris), the Austrian Akademie der Wissenschaften, and the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts. Her activities promoting Byzantine studies in the People’s Republic of China led to her being named an honorary professor at Nankai University.Laiou had the rare gifts of an original mind, an iron will, and a penetrating intellect. She fearlessly spoke out to correct error or false impressions, but always chose her words judiciously. Even those who sometimes disagreed with her in departmental discussions knew that she shared their highest standards and appreciated her courtly tone. A very private person, Professor Laiou was a devoted friend and impeccable colleague. She could display, behind the scenes, a gentle attentiveness and humor that would have amazed those who only knew her imposing persona professionally. Fiercely devoted to her University and her Department of History, Angeliki would not want us to fail to mention her pride in History’s claiming for this University in 1948, its first tenured woman professor, the distinguished medievalist Helen Cam whose portrait hangs in the Faculty Room; herself as its first female chairman—this is the term that Laiou insisted on; and, indeed, its first woman president.And now, in its first generation, Harvard has lost—so suddenly—one of the great teacher scholars in its history, who also happened to be one of the first great woman teachers, scholars, mentors, and administrators in the four centuries of our corporate existence. But the fact that she will always be remembered as one of the most distinguished of our number owes nothing to coincidence. The power and rigor of her intellect would have guaranteed her that status whether she was of the first or the fiftieth generation of the great professors of Harvard University who happen to be women. Many Harvard students and colleagues, male—and especially female—have said how much she meant, as a model and as a judicious, tough-minded yet supportive mentor in this new, more open academic world that Angeliki Laiou helped to create for all of our benefit. Nor is her impact confined to Harvard. At her memorial service, a tribute symbolizing her global reach came from female colleagues and former students, who today hold distinguished appointments from Berkeley to Istanbul, via Columbia and Harvard.Professor Angeliki Laiou is survived by her son Vassili Thomadakis.Respectfully submitted,Charles S. MaierJohn Womack, Jr.Jan ZiolkowskiMichael McCormick, Chairlast_img read more

Pujara, Vijay make strong start in reply to England’s 400

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first_imgBy Sudipto GangulyMUMBAI, India (Reuters) – Murali Vijay and Cheteshwar Pujara shared a century stand as India made a strong start in their reply to England’s total of 400 on the second day of the fourth Test at the Wankhede Stadium yesterday.Vijay was unbeaten on 70 and Pujara on 47 not out with India on 146 for one at the close, still 254 runs behind.The right-handed pair added 107 runs for the second wicket after Lokesh Rahul had fallen following an opening stand of 39 with Vijay.England captain Alastair Cook introduced spin from both ends after seven overs and there was considerable turn on offer for Moeen Ali and Adil Rashid.Rahul hit four crisp boundaries in his 24 before off-spinner Moeen breached his defences to bowl him.Vijay twice mishit Rashid but the ball landed safely beyond the reach of the fielders on both occasions. The opener hit the leg-spinner for six over the long-off boundary.Pujara looked solid and hit some sublime boundaries off the back foot against the England fast bowlers.Earlier, Jos Buttler made 76 to guide the touring side, trailing 2-0 in the five-match series, to a strong total before they were all out 25 minutes after lunch.India off-spinner Ravichandran Ashwin completed figures of six for 112 for his 23rd five-wicket haul and left-arm spinner Ravindra Jadeja took the other four wickets.Resuming on 288 for five, England lost Ben Stokes for 31 in the third over to Ashwin, who had picked up four wickets on Thursday.The umpire turned down the appeal for catch against Stokes but India managed to overturn the decision on review with the batsman leaving the field making his displeasure evident.Jadeja dismissed Chris Woakes and Rashid cheaply to boost India’s chances of keeping England’s total to under 350.But Buttler and number 10 Jake Ball, playing his first match of the series and second overall, frustrated India with a partnership of 54 for the ninth wicket.Ashwin broke the stand when Ball, who was on nought when India captain Virat Kohli dropped a sharp chance at slip off Jadeja, was caught behind.Buttler repeatedly used the reverse sweep against Jadeja and hit six boundaries and a big six off Ashwin before Jadeja bowled him as he attempted another big shot.ENGLAND 1st innings (overnight 288-5)A. Cook stp. P. Patel b Jadeja 46K. Jennings c Pujara b R. Ashwin 112J. Root c Kohli b R. Ashwin 21M. Ali c Nair b R. Ashwin 50J. Bairstow c U. Yadav b R. Ashwin 14B. Stokes c Kohli b R. Ashwin 31J. Buttler b Jadeja 76C. Woakes c P. Patel b Jadeja 11A. Rashid b Jadeja 4J. Ball c P. Patel b R. Ashwin 31J. Anderson not out 0Extras: (b-1, lb-2, nb-1) 4Total: (all out, 130.1 overs) 400Fall of wickets: 1-99, 2-136, 3-230, 4-230, 5-249, 6-297, 7-320, 8-334, 9-388.Bowling: B. Kumar 13-0-49-0, U. Yadav 11-2-38-0, R. Ashwin 44-4-112-6, J. Yadav 25-3-89-0 (nb-1), R. Jadeja 37.1-5-109-4.INDIA 1st inningsL. Rahul b Ali 24M. Vijay not out 70C. Pujara not out 47Extras: (b-1, lb-4) 5Total: (for 1 wickets, 52 overs) 146Fall of wickets: 1-39.Bowling: J. Anderson 8-4-22-0, C. Woakes 5-2-15-0, M. Ali 15-2-44-1, A. Rashid 13-1-49-0, J. Ball 4-2-4-0, B. Stokes 4-2-4-0, J. Root 3-1-3-0.last_img read more

CSA provides boxed fresh produce for USC students

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first_imgDespite the common perception of college food consisting of ramen noodles, soda and junk food, USC students actually have the option of eating farm fresh produce delivered directly to campus.Boxed goods · The South Central Farmers organization currently offers boxes of organic food for students to pick up at the JEP House. – Joseph Chen | Daily TrojanIn addition to the grocery stores that surround the university, USC students can participate in the South Central Farmers produce delivery program.“It is very hard to get fresh produce in Los Angeles, and I have found that these fruits and vegetables are incredibly fresh,” said Joshua Bernstein, a graduate student studying philosophy, who ordered a box this week.“This is a really unique program, and I hope that USC continues to have it,” he said.USC is one of the locations the South Central Farmers Coop, a community-supported agriculture group, drops off boxes of organic produce at on a weekly basis. Susan Harris, the program director for South Central Farmers at USC, estimates the program has had a pickup location at USC for around five years. USC students can order either a full box or a mini box of organic, seasonal fruits and vegetables and pick them up at the Joint Educational Project House on Wednesdays between 2 and 6 p.m. The boxes cost between $15 and $25 a week, and all the produce is farm-fresh and locally produced.Though many students are not aware of it, the program has gotten some attention recently. Earlier this month, the delivery program  was featured in Undergraduate Student Government’s weekly newsletter.Community supported agriculture, better known as CSA, is a relatively new concept  in farming that has been gaining momentum since its introduction to the United States in the mid-1980s. The South Central Farmers CSA is a nonprofit organization that is “committed to engaging and empowering community members around attaining food sovereignty and access to high quality organic produce,” according to the group’s website.USC is not the only university South Central Farmers delivers to — the group also has three pickup centers at UCLA. Other locations the group delivers to range across Los Angeles, from the Beverly Hills Farmers Market to the Watts Farmers Market.Since Harris took over coordination for the USC campus in 2010, she estimates students have ordered between three and 12 individual boxes each week.“We have several students who regularly buy boxes every week and are very happy to have this service provided conveniently on campus,” Harris said. “I believe it could be a much bigger program.”Advertising could be part of the reason the program has remained relatively small. Many students said they were not aware of it.“I hadn’t heard of it before,” said Jade Rechler, a freshman majoring in broadcast and digital journalism. “But it sounds like a really great program that I would love to learn more about.”Others agreed that the CSA is something they might be interested in subscribing to.“This seems like an awesome program for students at USC, so hopefully it will gain more traction and recognition on campus,” said Rachel Ben-Menachem, a freshman majoring in theatre. Follow us on Twitter @dailytrojanlast_img read more