Tag Archives: 宁波龙品茶论坛

Free images to illustrate your coronavirus content

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first_imgOther sourcesOther free stock photo sites offer free coronavirus-related images:UnsplashPixabayFreepik AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis14 Tagged with: charity communications coronavirus COVID-19 FREE infographic Advertisement Charities, bloggers and businesses need to illustrate their coronavirus-related content and appeals with relevant images. That can be a challenge with some staff on furlough, others working from home and minimal opportunity to get out to take photos. So here is a collection of coronavirus image and video resources, most of them free, that might be of some help.Coronavirus news and articles abound with that illustration of a virus particle created and made available by the CDC in the US. But how can your charity illustrate your coronavirus information updates or appeals with related images that are different?Having run our popular Graphic Traffic course for several years for charities, and needing to use images to illustrate our coronavirus fundraising news, we’ve been keeping an eye out for such content to share with you. 8. CanvaCanva has created a collection of templates to help #StopTheSpread. There are posters, Instagram Stories, social posts, Facebook posts and more, for digital and print. 5. Pexels 4. LoomScreencapture and video tool Loom has cut its prices, removing recording limits on some of its plans, and extending its services to educational institutions to free “for ever”. It offers a free service anyway. 3. StockphotosecretsStockphotosecrets offers a selection of free coronavirus-related images. (Free registration required).It also has a list of other related image resources. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Free images to illustrate your coronavirus content 1. CrelloCrello offers free image templates on the topic of coronavirus.  1,343 total views,  1 views today 2. IconFinderIconFinder offers several sets of icons illustrating coronavirus awareness. Free stock photo and video site Pexels is offering free Zoom backgrounds, to brighten up the background as you spend much of your day in video calls. 7. RawpixelRawpixel collaborated with the Behavioural Sciences team at Hill+Knowlton Strategies to create COVID-19 design resources which “resonate best with the public”. Taking public health advice and testing variations of these, Rawpixel conducted a behavioural sciences study to reveal which Covid-19 messages are best at changing people’s attitudes, and made these images available for free. 6. From physical to virtual eventsMobile giving service Donr is offering free image templates for charities that have had to convert physical fundraising events into digital events or campaigns.  1,344 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis14 Howard Lake | 16 April 2020 | Newslast_img read more

Caherline kids star on Operation Transformation

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first_imgCheck out this amazing aerial video of the pupils and staff of a Limerick primary school forming a stick man shape – doing jumping jacks and keepy uppies.The 181 boys and girls and 15 staff of Caherline National School all took part in the display. It was filmed using a drone and directed by teacher Bridget Lambert. The school made the video for Operation Transformation‘s [email protected] which aired tonight at 8.30pm on RTÉ One.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Schools all around the country are doing 10 minutes of exercise at 10am on Friday 10 February to celebrate 10 years of Operation Transformation. Schools can download an exercise video at www.rte.ie/ot or they can decide on their own creative way to get moving like Caherline NS. Limerick National School named winner in Gala Gifts for school competition Advertisement Twitter TAGSCaherline National SchoolOperation Transformation Limerick Post Show | May 15th 2020 Facebook NewsEducationCaherline kids star on Operation TransformationBy Editor – February 9, 2017 1769 Previous articleBeyond the neon runesNext articleOpinion – They just did their jobs Editor Printcenter_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Email Linkedin Operation Transformation’s Dr Eddie to feature at Shannon Chamber Seminar Limerick Post Show | Operation Transformation Operation Transformation looking for five new leaders Austism Awareness Feel Good Story Caherline National School Limerick WhatsApplast_img read more

Call for large attendance at hospital rally

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first_img By News Highland – August 7, 2010 Twitter Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleKeavney stresses importance of music and arts in promoting reconcilliationNext articleBuncrana gardai concerned for safety of missing man News Highland A large crowd is expected to take to the streets of Letterkenny today to protest against any move to reduce local health and hospital services. The march will leave the town’s Station Roundabout at 12 noon and make its way to the car park above St Conal’s Hospital, where a number of speakers will address the crowd.One of those speakers, Senator Pearse Doherty, says its time for the people of Donegal to make their voices heard………[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/pearse10.mp3[/podcast] Pinterest Facebook LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton Google+ Twitter Newscenter_img WhatsApp WhatsApp Facebook Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson NPHET ‘positive’ on easing restrictions – Donnelly Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Call for large attendance at hospital rally Pinterest Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this weeklast_img read more

Physical Science – Adjunct

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first_imgQualifications * Are you a Christian?YesNo Qualified applicants will possess at least a master’s degree in arelated field. Candidates must embrace the mission of CaliforniaBaptist University, and demonstrate a clear understanding of, andcommitment to, excellence in teaching through the integration ofChristian faith and learning. The Department of Chemical Sciences at California BaptistUniversity invites applications for part-time, adjunct instructorpositions in physical science. Review of applications is conductedin an ongoing manner according to need. Teaching assignments will be lower level undergraduatecourses. Position TitlePhysical Science – Adjunct Quick Link to Postinghttps://jobs.calbaptist.edu/postings/6066 Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*). Applicant DocumentsRequired DocumentsChristian Experience EssayCurriculum VitaeOptional DocumentsResumeCover LetterLetter of Reference 1Letter of Reference 2Unofficial Transcriptcenter_img Posting Details Nondiscrimination Statement Position Summary * Do you attend church regularly?YesNo State and Federal law permit California Baptist University todiscriminate on the basis of religion in order to fulfill itspurpose. The University does not discriminate contrary to eitherState or Federal law. If no, please explain (required):(Open Ended Question)* Are you both familiar with and not in conflict with thefundamental doctrines and practices of the California SouthernBaptist Convention as stated in the Baptist Faith and Message datedJune 14, 2000? (Please see above link for more information)Yes (I am familiar and not in conflict)No (I am in conflict or not familiar) Teaching Responsibilitieslast_img read more

In racial protests, a continuing ripple effect

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first_imgAs protests have continued to percolate nationally in the wake of decisions by grand juries in Missouri and New York not to indict police officers in the deaths of two unarmed black men, hundreds of members of the Harvard community have expressed their own frustration and desire for change during a range of demonstrations and discussions both on campus and off.Hundreds of protesters, including many from the Harvard community, took to the streets Friday night, briefly stopping traffic in Harvard Square and then marching down Memorial Drive to Central Square before returning. The demonstration resembled weekend protests in other cities where thousands also marched.In recent days, many from the Harvard community have attended protests, marches, vigils, and “die-ins,” in which participants lie down in a show of solidarity and dissent against violence toward black men. Many community members engaged in informal campus conversations and listening sessions organized by deans and administrators of Harvard’s graduate schools. Some students penned open letters and op-eds calling for action.“Our students are no different than many people across this country who feel, with these recent decisions or nondecisions, that injustice has overplayed its hand,” said Jonathan Walton, Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church, who took part in campus protests and helped organize a student-led “die-in” on the church steps a week ago.“Black lives matter,” Harvard President Drew Faust said, echoing ongoing concern across the University. “It has taken far too long to make that fundamental truth a living, essential part of the fabric of our society, our government, and our lives. Martin Luther King Jr. made clear a half century ago why we can’t wait. What was urgent then is imperative now.”Last week, Faust recalled her early involvement in the national campaign for civil rights.“Nearly 50 years ago, I watched on a grainy black-and-white television as the heads and bodies of John Lewis and dozens more protesters were bloodied as they peacefully marched to secure the right to vote. I, and thousands of other Americans, could not remain silent,” she recalled. “I skipped my freshman college midterms and drove from Pennsylvania to Selma, Alabama, to bear witness, to affirm with my presence something essential about who I was and about what I wanted our nation to be. It seemed to me an inescapable necessity. John Lewis might have called it making ‘necessary trouble.’“Now, a half century later, individuals from across Harvard and across the nation have embraced a similar imperative to refuse silence, to reject injustice, to demand something better from ourselves and our nation,” she said. “I mourn that this is still necessary, that injustice still thrives so many years after we hoped we could at last overcome the troubled legacy of race in America. But I also celebrate how in recent days our community has demonstrated its commitment in both words and deeds to eradicating every pernicious form of racism and discrimination. ‘What will you do?’ Rev. Jonathan Walton asked in Memorial Church last Sunday. We will speak out against injustice; we will join together to insist that things must change.”The public reactions to the grand jury rulings in Missouri and New York have had a ripple effect at Harvard. On Dec. 1, students joined a protest with others from Cambridge Rindge and Latin School, briefly stopping traffic in Harvard Square. Two days later, a student-organized protest unfolded in front of the John Harvard Statue. Approximately 200 people took part in the demonstration, which included comments from Harvard faculty and a “die-in.”“A big point of the protest was to get people to interact with this issue who maybe have the privilege to ignore it because it doesn’t directly affect their lives,” said a rally organizer, Fadhal Moore ’15, who is a member of the Black Community Leaders, an umbrella group for undergraduate black organizations.The oldest of five who said he often thinks about his siblings, worrying that they could be killed by police someday, Moore called the campus reaction hopeful. “At the end of the day,” he said, “it has been very, very encouraging to see all these people come together.”Demonstrations and forums have touched most of the University in recent days. Harvard Law School (HLS) Dean Martha Minow, who wrote a column for the Boston Globe last Tuesday calling for reforms to the nation’s criminal justice system, invited members of the HLS community to a conversation with her and faculty members the following day to discuss the issues and “to think together about how we might move forward and contribute to the effort,” she said in an email announcing the session.At Harvard Business School, about 500 people gathered in Burden Hall to remember Michael Brown and Eric Garner and raise awareness about racial profiling.Last Wednesday, close to 100 people, including Harvard students, faculty, administrators, and staff, gathered for a candid discussion at Phillips Brooks House led by Harvard College Dean Rakesh Khurana and Emelyn dela Peña, the College’s assistant dean of student life for equity, diversity, and inclusion.“Many in our College community are in pain and struggling right now, and no matter our understanding of the issue, we must come together to comfort and support each other,” wrote Khurana in an email titled “Standing Together” that announced the event.The hourlong discussion touched on many of the challenges surrounding frank conversations about race. Several attendees wondered how to be better allies to the African-American community. Others responded that being an effective ally means being willing to take risks and getting comfortable with uncomfortable conversations. Some called for greater support from the administration. Administrators in the room answered with pledges to renew commitments to connecting with minorities and allies across campus.“I appreciate what you said, that we have to do better,” said Khurana, “and we have to be willing to take risks, and that also means, I guess, a little more forgiveness on the other end.”Following the talk, Sarah Cole, a senior and president of the Harvard Black Students Association, said she felt encouraged.“I think it’s important for this campus as a whole to acknowledge what has happened, to acknowledge how it has affected people, both internally and externally. And so it’s really powerful to see our administrators and our students and our faculty coming together in this space to actually do that.”Sophomore and Mather House resident Olivia Castor said she was also heartened to see members of the faculty and the administration taking part. “I know at several other schools throughout the country, students don’t have the support of their faculty and administrators, and to see that here we do, it’s just really amazing and it’s really reaffirming.”Similar listening sessions, conversations, and discussions have taken place elsewhere. The Harvard Graduate School of Design, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Harvard Kennedy School all convened talks with students, faculty, staff, and administrators last week. At Harvard Medical School, which also hosted an open forum, more than 100 HMS students, joined by faculty and staff, took part in a nationwide medical student “die-in” last Wednesday, lying on the floor of Harvard’s Tosteson Medical Education Center on Longwood Avenue in Boston for 15½ minutes.The Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) held an earlier open dialogue for students, organized by the school’s student council and office of student affairs. The session was attended by Dean James E. Ryan and came the day after the grand jury decided not to indict Darren Wilson, the white police officer who fatally shot Brown in August. The HGSE’s dean’s office also created a fellowship fund for students interested in doing social justice work in Missouri or in Greater Boston in January. Last Tuesday, students also led a “die-in” in the Gutman Library.In addition to supporting and helping to organize recent protests and marches, Harvard Divinity School (HDS) students, with help from Walton, traveled to Ferguson, Mo., in August to support local organizations and protesters. Students from HLS have also gone to Ferguson in recent months to offer support and act as legal observers.HLS students have also organized protests and events. McKenzie Morris, president of the Harvard Black Law Students Association, said her organization has been “active on this point since the Mike Brown death in August.” In October, the group organized a conference with members of the Boston and Cambridge communities, including representatives of each city’s police departments, to discuss issues such as the accountability of law enforcement. The group co-hosted a campus talk about race with the School’s American Constitution Society and recently sent an open letter to President Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder with more than 1,000 signatures that included a call for legislation requiring police to wear body cameras.Across campus, many students said they have taken comfort in the ability to simply share their grief and frustration with others from the community.After the Ferguson decision, HDS students held a gathering in one of the School’s small chapels. People sat in silence, sang, cried out, spoke, testified, prayed, “whatever their hearts led them to do,” recalled HDS student Melissa Bartholomew. “Because I have spaces like that — and a community to connect with, and a community that is diverse and crosses all faiths lines, and gender lines, and economic lines, and racial lines — to be in the midst of spaces like that is so healing and encouraging and affirming for me as an African-American woman going through these experiences. I’ve been really grateful for each opportunity that we’ve had to gather as a community.”During his Sunday sermon a week ago, Walton told listeners: “For those who think that this is overblown, until one feels the dehumanizing blow of being of the wrong race in the wrong space, and thus always and already guilty upon arrival, one should refrain from all the sanctimonious bromides about guilt, innocence, or simply following the law.”Just before the service ended, Walton made his way outside to the church steps, where he urged protesters, many of them students, to start “thinking about your careers in such a way that you can help dislodge, you can help dislodge our criminal system from the bitter hands of corruption.” The group then took part in a “die-in,” causing members of the congregation to step over them as they exited the church.“Martin Luther King Jr. once said that desegregation is about physical proximity, but integration is about spiritual affinity, and so really it’s about the human connection. And so one of the things that I wanted to do was to bring students together with the worshiping community on Sunday,” said Walton later in the week.Castor, who also helped organize the Memorial Church session, said the goal was to get those who don’t think the issue affects them to see things differently.“It interrupted daily life because it forced you to take another path. It forced you to go somewhere where you wouldn’t have gone before … that’s why I thought it was very, very powerful, and very important.”Faust said she hoped that meaningful, lasting change comes out of the current protests and discussions.“I hope that in the half century to come, our remarkable students will also commit to use their lives and their education — in law, in medicine, in education, in public health, in politics, in the arts, and in so many other fields — in service of the freedom, dignity, and equality they have called for this week. At this University, we have a special responsibility to speak and live the truth. This challenges us to use our voices and our actions to help build a world in which we work to make our values real, a world in which differences are not sources of oppression and divisiveness, but of strength and community, a world of justice for all.”last_img read more

Spaghetti dinner/FFA labor auction a huge success

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first_imgSumner  Newscow report — The Wellington FFA Spaghetti Dinner and Labor Auction was a huge success in the commons area Monday evening. Here are a couple of pictures from Newscow photographer Amber Schmitz:FFA President Haley Farley serving spaghetti.Labor auction participants and Monday’s festivities.Auctioneer Jeremy Wiens spends the evening selling the wares.Follow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more