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Howe – We didnt perform well

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first_imgAFC Bournemouth manager Eddie Howe says his team performed poorly in their 2-1 away defeat at Newcastle on Saturday.Howe was disappointed with the Cherries’ performance, as they lost to Newcastle after going down two goals in the first half.I think we didn’t perform well in the first half and I’m disappointed with the start, we gave ourselves a mountain to climb going 2-0 down,” Howe told Bournemouth website.“We did well for phases of the second half but it wasn’t to be, the lads kept going right to the end so that’s an initial positive.Eddie Howe pleased with attacking poise, but feels Wilson was too honest Stuart Heath – August 25, 2019 A.F.C Bournemouth manager Eddie Howe felt as though his striker Callum Wilson was too honest against Manchester City and may have won a penalty,…“You felt like a goal was coming, but we just couldn’t force it through.“We feel we’re good enough to beat almost anybody in this league if we perform well, but today we haven’t hit our best levels and have been beaten.“This league is ruthless enough to do that to you, and the challenge is now for us to analyze this game and we have to come back as a better team for it after the international break.”last_img read more

Purring tempo sliding notes grab cats attention

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first_img More information: www.appliedanimalbehaviour.com … (15)00060-X/abstract Citation: Purring tempo, sliding notes grab cats’ attention (2015, February 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-02-purring-tempo-cats-attention.html Is there such a thing as cat-centric music, which is pleasing music to cats’ ears? Explore further Credit: Wikipedia Cat shelter findings: Less stress with box access The journal Applied Animal Behavioral Science has published online a study by a team from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and University of Maryland. They worked to produce cat-centric music and tried it out on domestic cats.”We looked at the natural vocalizations of cats and matched our music to the same frequency range, which is about an octave or more higher than human voices,” lead author Charles Snowdon said in Discovery News. “We incorporated tempos that we thought cats would find interesting—the tempo of purring in one piece and the tempo of suckling in another—and since cats use lots of sliding frequencies in their calls, the cat music had many more sliding notes than the human music.” The journal carrying their study is the official journal of the International Society for Applied Ethology. Their research approach involved observations of 47 domestic cats hearing two types of music—one type relaxing classical music pleasing to humans (Gabriel Fauré’s Elegie and Johann Sebastian Bach’s Air on a G String) and the other type, specially created cat music. What were the results? “While the relaxing classical music did not freak out the felines, they basically ignored it, showing no interest whatsoever,” said Discovery News. The cat music grabbed their attention. “Cats possess scent glands along their tails, on each side of their head, between their front paws and on other parts of their body. When a cat rubs something or someone, prior research concludes this means the cat is claiming that thing or individual. In this case, the cats appeared to be trying to claim the music, represented by the speaker playing it,” said Discovery News. “They did not rub against the speakers when the Bach and Fauré pieces were played.”Most of the cats in the study were mixed breeds; it was not possible to examine if certain breeds liked music more than others. Also, the researchers discovered that younger and older cats responded more to the feline-specific music than middle-aged cats. Could the findings support useful applications? Cats experience stress in cat shelters. Their work may have relevance for shelter cats, especially those accustomed to human companionship. Snowden said in Discovery News that there was “some research showing that cats experience separation anxiety, which is greater in human-raised cats than in feral cats.” The authors in their study wrote that “The results suggest novel and more appropriate ways for using music as auditory enrichment for nonhuman animals.” Beyond cats, other animals have been explored for musical response, as researchers seek to learn more about responses to music by species other than human. Co-author of this cat study, David Teie, who is a musician and composer, has explored cognitive processes involved in music appreciation. Working with Snowdon at the University of Wisconsin, they have studied “species-specific music” and looked at its effect on tamarin monkeys. The website “Music for Cats” describes their work. They performed tests at the University of Wisconsin using response to human music as their experimental control. Included in observed behaviors were locomotion, vocalization, scent marking, female solicitation, foraging and speaker orientation. As for the tamarins, they showed a lack of interest in the human music. By contrast, the effect on them of the species-specific music composed by David Teie was reported as clear and convincing. “They displayed a marked increase of activity in response to the music that was designed to excite them, while the ‘tamarin ballad’ music induced a significant calming. This calming effect was measured against the baseline of silence; they moved and vocalized less and orientated more toward the audio speakers during and immediately following the playing of the tamarin ballad.” © 2015 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

In a first AIIMS docs remove 17 kg tumour from womans abdomen

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first_imgIn a case that may be counted as first of its kind, a tumour weighing 17 kg was taken out from the abdomen of a 30-year-old woman suffering from a rare ovarian tumour (growing teratoma syndrome) by the doctors of All-India Institute of Medical Sciences.  Experts claimed that it was the largest ovarian tumour removal in India till now and the case has been sent to be documented in Limca Book of Records. The biggest ovarian cyst removal in India till now mentioned in the Limca Book of Records is of 6.1 kg. N Devi, a native of Bihar was referred to AIIMS in December last year with huge abdominal tumour, which was growing rapidly and caused constant pain. The woman had developed a small cystic tumour in her right ovary, for which she had undergone ovarian cystectomy in Bihar in 2014, said Neerja Bhatla from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, AIIMS. “However, even after chemotherapy, the mass inside the abdomen kept growing progressively. In fact within 8-9 months the tumour had occupied whole of her abdomen and doctors had given up on the case,” Bhatla added.last_img read more

Victoria Memorial Hall awed by rural Rajasthan museum

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first_imgKolkata: The authorities of Victoria Memorial Hall on Friday have drawn inspiration from a remarkable small museum — Arna-Jharna, the desert museum in Rajasthan that uses brooms as a metaphor for life in the desert and seeks public engagement with the folk culture and oral traditions of the locality.Noted research scholar and cultural critic Rustom Bharucha, who had been the project director in the early stages of the making of the eco-museum delivered an informal talk titled “Grassroots Museology in the Indian Context: The Making of Arna-Jharna,” highlighted his experience in the unique museum located in a rural area near Jodhpur in Rajasthan. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataThe lecture was organised to observe the International Museum Day that falls on Saturday, May 18. “Every year we offer free admission to our museum and gardens on International Museum Day. At the same time, we also organise something or the other that offers some food for thought for the museum sector, some significant takeaway for those who love museums, and work in or think about them. “We have earlier listened to and learnt from some of the world leaders in this field, coming from such iconic museums such as the British Museum, the Georges Pompidou Centre and the Smithsonian. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in state”However, this year, we wanted to have knowledge about a small rather unconventional museum – Arna-Jharna,” said Jayanta Sengupta, secretary and curator of Victoria Memorial Hall . According to Sengupta, Arna-Jharna is among those rare specialty museums that seek, with very limited or no government support, to capture the voices of the small, the marginal, the peripheral. “In my opinion, it stands to capture our many pasts and complex presents much more effectively, and with the necessary criticality that is much more difficult for encyclopedic museums to emulate,” he said. Envisioned by the renowned folklorist and ethnomusicologist Komal Kothari, and supported by a team of practitioners affiliated to Rupayan Sansthan, this unique museum focuses on one particular object — the broom — to reflect on traditional knowledge systems and their sustenance in today’s world. The talk elaborated on the research that went into making the broom at botanical, environmental, social, and political levels and provided insights into the curatorial challenges of representing the broom. The lecture was paired with the screening of a documentary film, Jhadu Katha (Broom Stories), directed by Navroze Contrator, which was specially commissioned by the museum. “A handful of tourists on a trip to Rajasthan visit this museum because people are unaware of it which is located some 15 odd kilometers from Jodhpur,” Sengupta said.last_img read more