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Wednesday Results from UHSRA Rodeo Championships

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first_img Written by Brad James June 11, 2020 /Sports News – Local Wednesday Results from UHSRA Rodeo Championships There will be two sessions of competition Thursday at the Washington County Fairgrounds.center_img Tags: Hurricane/UHSRA FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailHURRICANE, Utah-Here are Wednesday’s updated results from the UHSRA Rodeo Championships which ensue through Saturday at the Washington County Fairgrounds of Hurricane.Breakaway1st-Louey Dansie (Lehi) 3.292nd-Kamryn Carlsen (Sevier) 3.553rd-Macee McAllister (Dixie)Goat Tying1st-Skylee Draper (Juab) 7.432nd-Sammy Taylor (Uintah Basin) 8.033rd-Anndee Belliston (Emery) 9.18Barrel Racing1st-Marynn Moody (West Millard) 16.7492nd-Hailey Humphrey (South Utah County) 16.7923rd-Peyton Bennett (Lehi) 16.941Pole Bending1st-Jade Rindlisbacher (Juab) 20.992nd-Kate Torgerson (Lehi) 20.3023rd-Jaid Stowell (Cedar) 20.754Steer Wrestling1st-Wyatt Davis (Southern Utah County) 6.122nd-Brandon Youd (Juab) 15.83Tie Down Roping1st-Cole Magnuson (Emery) 11.722nd-Chad Reber (Enterprise) 12.113rd-Wyatt Crandall (Juab) 12.22Team Roping1st-Chase Webster and Zach Lewis (South Summit) 7.7802nd-Quade Matthews and Rylie Oberg (Southern Utah County) 10.243rd-Preston Olsen and Hayden Roundy (Southern Utah County) 11.91last_img read more

Eagles Host Quad Middle School Cross Country Meet

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first_imgThe Jac-Cen-Del junior high cross country teams ran in a four-way meet at home against Milan, St. Lawrence, and Sunman Dearborn on Thursday (8/22). The JCD girls’ team finished third. The JCD boys’ did not have a complete team and finished fourth. [email protected] of Eagles Coach Steve Narwold.last_img

DUFFY DOES DALLAS – BURTONPORT MMA STAR READY FOR UFC DEBUT

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first_imgBurtonport MMA star Joseph Duffy makes his UFC debut this Saturday in Dallas against Jake Lindsay.Donegal UFC star Joseph Duffy makes his long-awaited UFC debut on Saturday night when he faces Jake Lindsay at UFC 185 in Dallas.Duffy is the latest in a long-line of Irish fighters to fly the Irish flag in the UFC octagon.However, Duffy will also have the Donegal flag draped around him when he goes into battle on Saturday. Duffy has enjoyed a dizzying nine months since making his return to Cage Warriors after a three-year sabbatical from MMA.He destroyed Damien Lapilus at The Helix in Dublin in his comeback fight then a simply stunning KO of  Frenchman Julien Boussuge with a knee to his face put him firmly back on the UFC radar.It had been well documented how Duffy was the last fighter to defeat current UFC stars Conor McGrgeor and Norman Parke.So the UFC offered Duffy a lucrative contract and his dream move to the UFC was sealed. Duffy has been in an intense training camp at Tristar Gym in Montreal, Canada for the last six weeks.The world-famous gym took Duffy on-board once he signed for the UFC and that’s where he will be based from now on.Tristar coach Eric O’Keefe has been impressed with Duffy and believes the Burtonport man is destined for great things in the sport.O’Keefe said, “From all we’ve seen of Joe, he can take it to the top.“I think he’ll be a force to be reckoned with in the UFC,. “The sky is his limit.Duffy’s opponent has a decent record he win his first nine bouts in the UFC and was regarded as a future world champion.However, consecutive defeats have meant Lindsay is now fighting to save his career.Duffy knows he’ll faces a top-class opponent and there’s no such thing as an easy fight in the UFC. However, he’s confident he can do the business and get his UFC career off to a dream start in Dallas on Saturday night.A huge following of from Ireland and Wales are expected to descend on the venue and that will only add to Duffy’s armour.DUFFY DOES DALLAS – BURTONPORT MMA STAR READY FOR UFC DEBUT was last modified: March 12th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:BowburtonportCareerDallasDebutdonegalIrelandJake LindsayJoseph DuffyMMASaturdayUFCUFC 185last_img read more

Beware: Tick numbers could be on the rise this spring

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The warm winter weather has many concerned that ticks will be early and plentiful this spring. Those working outdoors need to be on the lookout.Aside from just providing a serious case of the heebie-jeebies, ticks are a real, and growing threat to human and animal health because they carry diseases. According to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, blacklegged ticks are active throughout the year in Ohio with the adults active in the spring, fall and winter. The nymphs are active in the spring and summer and the larvae are active in late summer. The onset of human Lyme disease cases occurs all year in Ohio, but incidents peak in summer following the emergence of the nymphs.Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks, according to the Ohio Department of Health. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans — the “bull’s-eye” rash. Lyme disease occurs primarily in the Northeastern and upper Midwestern United States with Ohio located in between. Ohio has reported fairly low occurrence of Lyme disease in the past, but since 2010 blacklegged tick populations in Ohio have increased dramatically and their range continues to expand, particularly in the forest habitats. Increased cases of Lyme disease have followed.Greene County Christmas tree grower Matt Mongin had an awful run-in with Lyme disease that he hopes to help others avoid.Matt Mongin had a nasty run in with Lyme disease.“After 30 years in the Christmas tree business, in 2015 I encountered Lyme disease. I am not sure when I got it, but in the fall just before we opened our farm after Thanksgiving I got seriously sick. My wife took me to the emergency room and within 24 hours I lost consciousness,” Mongin said. “The physicians in the ICU weren’t sure if I would live. They gave me a cocktail of antibiotics that they thought might help and it worked. Within three or four days I regained consciousness and I was better but I was in the hospital for 13 days. I lost my entire 2015 sales season. It took another 4.5 months of daily injections of antibiotics to cure the Lyme disease.”The Center for Disease Control reports 30,000 new cases of Lyme disease each year around the country, but experts believe that most cases are never reported. There were 112 Ohio confirmed Lyme disease cases in 2015 with 42 more probable cases, up from 58 in 2005.“Lyme disease specialists around the country say that Lyme disease is hugely under reported and their current estimate is 300,000 new cases each year,” Mongin said.The best protection from tick bites is to simply avoid areas where they are present during the months when the nymphs are most active from March through August. Of course, many in agriculture do not have that option.“The next best thing to do is to understand the life cycle of the tick. They have a complex life cycle with four phases from eggs to larvae to nymph to adult. At each phase they need a blood meal from a warm-blooded mammal,” he said. “Typically the smallest ticks have their blood meal from a mouse or other small rodent.  The larger ticks look for bigger mammals like humans.”Because the nymphs require larger animals for a food source, they are highly dependent on deer in Ohio to move and find mates. Fencing to prevent deer can be effective in avoiding ticks and Lyme disease in commonly used outdoor areas. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests tips to create tick-safe zones for children, family members and employees to make areas less attractive to ticks through landscaping. These include:• Clear tall grasses and brush around homes and at the edge of lawns.Place a three-foot wide barrier of wood chips or gravel between lawns and wooded areas and around patios and play equipment. This will restrict tick migration into recreational areas.Mow the lawn frequently and keep leaves raked.Stack wood neatly and in a dry area to discourage rodents that ticks feed on.Keep playground equipment, decks, and patios away from yard edges and trees and place them in a sunny location, if possible.Remove any old furniture, mattresses, or trash from the yard that may give ticks a place to hide.Mongin also stressed the importance of dressing appropriately.“When you are out in the woods you need to dress to prevent them from having access to your skin. They are out there and you want long pants and long shirts when you are outdoors near the woods or trees where ticks are,” he said. “Wear long pants, socks and long sleeved shirts. Tuck your pants into your socks or boots and secure them with a cord, rubber band or Velcro tie. Then shower as soon as you go indoors and look for ticks on your skin and in your hair. Wash and dry your clothing on high heat as soon as you can. Anti-tick sprays with Deet can also be helpful.”Ticks are flightless and do not jump. They crawl up tall grass, shrubs and bushes and wait for warm-blooded mammals to pass by. Then they grab onto fur or clothing and then crawl to areas of soft skin. Those who do find a tick on their skin need to remove it quickly.“Ideally you will see that tick and remove it quickly and if you do you will probably not get the disease. Ticks should be removed with a set of fine tweezers. Pull the tick’s head out of the skin and wash well with alcohol or soap and water. Heat or matches are not helpful. Then save the tick and show it to your doctor,” Mongin said. “You can take it in a plastic bag to your physician and they will advise you what to do next. Often they will give you an oral antibiotic to take for a couple of weeks and that will be the end of it. The bigger problem is if you have a tick bite and don’t know it.”Their bites do not cause itching so ticks can be hard to find. If it is not found and removed, a tick will feed and leave after a day or two.“The tick really needs to be embedded in your skin for a couple of days for you to get the disease. You may get a bulls-eye rash where the tick bit you and it is very distinctive. If you don’t get the rash but you’ve been bitten, you could get persistent Lyme disease that has flu-like systems with fever, headaches, joint pain, and chills,” Mongin said. “You need to talk to your medical professional and let them know that you have been in a position where you could have been exposed to ticks. Then they can do a blood test and get you the antibiotics you need to cure the disease. You probably will never know you have Lyme disease until you see a definitive rash or you have a blood test that shows you have antibodies to the bacteria that causes Lyme disease.”Antibiotics that are prescribed for Lyme disease include Amoxicillin, Tetracycline, Cefuroxime and Doxycycline. Left untreated, Lyme disease can be debilitating and challenging to cure.In addition to Lyme disease, the blacklegged tick is also the principal vector of human granulocytic anaplasmosis and babesiosis. The ticks may be co-infected with several disease agents, and some ticks may simultaneously infect a host with two or more of these diseases, according to Ohio State University Extension. Two other tick species in Ohio are medically important because they are disease vectors — the American dog tick and the lone star tick. All tick species are vectors of the heebie-jeebies.last_img read more

Featured Military Caregiving Mini-Series: 444 Days in the First Year

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first_imgMcCoy, Tabitha (2014). This is personal photo of Tabitha McCoy and family used with her permission.The caregiving mini-series, 444 Days in the First Year, was written by Tabitha McCoy. Tabitha is a contributor to the MFLN Military Caregiving team and is a former military caregiver to her husband, SGT Steve McCoy. In this mini-series, Tabitha shares her personal story of caregiving, loss, grieving, and transitioning, as well as insight and advice for both professionals and family caregivers as she recounts the 444 days following her husband’s death in June of 2008.Tabitha holds a Master of Science in Marriage & Family Therapy, is currently pursuing her doctoral degree in Marriage & Family Therapy with a concentration in Therapy with Military Families at Northcentral University, and is the Social Media and Webinar Coordination Specialist for MFLN Family Development. Like what you read here? Check out the….2015 MFLN Military Caregiving Virtual Learning Event  focusing on Reimagining Your Skills as a Helping Professional: Working with Military Family Caregivers. Be sure to visit their Virtual Learning Event webpage for more information and to view archived recordings of each event. By Tabitha McCoy, MSMFLN Family Development is featuring a 6 part blog series titled, 444 Days in the First Year, written by our very own Tabitha McCoy, Social Media and Webinar Coordination Specialist for the MFLN Family Development team. Tabitha originally wrote this blog series for the MFLN Military Caregiving team about her experience as a caregiver to her husband, Steve McCoy, Army SGT.Read the additional parts of the Military Caregiving mini series, 444 Days in the First Year, here:Part 2 – The Waiting RoomPart 3 – Unanswered QuestionsPart 4 – DecisionsPart 5 – Please Don’t Leave MePart 6 – Finalecenter_img 444 Days in the First Year Part 1The Phone CallMcCoy, Tabitha (2006). Former SGT Steve McCoy. Personal photo of Tabitha McCoy used with her permission.“Mama, what happened to my daddy?”  My three-year-old son asks from the back seat.It was Easter weekend and we were an hour into our three-hour drive back to my hometown to spend the weekend with my family.  I had just hung up the phone from yet another less than 5-minute phone conversation with my husband who six months prior had left for his second deployment to Iraq.Fighting back the tears of frustration from not being able to remember the last “real” conversation I had with my Soldier, I slapped on my “brave, everything is great face”, looked at both my son and daughter through the rear view mirror and said, “Nothing has happened to your daddy buddy, he just had to go work, but he said to tell you both that he loves you, and he will try to call us back this weekend.”Friday…no phone call, Saturday…no phone call, Easter Sunday…no phone callIt was beginning to feel like forever since I had heard my Soldiers voice and I was more than happy to be woken up before daylight to the sound of my phone ringing.  I was immediately wide-awake, over come with relief and anticipating the sweet sound of him saying, “Good morning baby.” However, as I reached for my phone my excitement quickly turned to dread as I read the number on the caller ID. It was not an “unknown” Iraqi pay-phone number that my husband would sometimes use to call me from, nor was it his satellite phone number.  No, this was a new number, one I had never seen before.I looked at my two babies who were still asleep in the bed beside me, and all of sudden I was reminded of the question my son asked me just a few days before, and with a shaky voice I said “hello.”Caregiver’s Advice to Professionals and Military FamiliesThe time shortly following the injury of a service member is stressful for everyone involved, and as both professional and civilian caregivers it is easy to place our focus solely upon the wounded service member. We must remember however, that the service member is only a part of an entire family system: and while the majority of the focus should be placed on the service member and their recovery, the family members have also in a sense, been wounded.The mental and physical health of the primary caregiver is such an important part in facilitating both recovery and health in the wounded service member, yet it is also something that can be easily overlooked; not only by the professionals who are being paid to take care of the service member but by the caregiver themselves.As professionals, education is key in understanding how to treat not just the wounded service member but the wounded family, and while the suggestions I make may seem simple or insignificant, I am drawing from my own personal experience; the brokenness I felt, the roller coaster of emotions I experienced, and how lonely it felt even though I was in a room full of people.  As I remember the first few days and weeks following my Soldiers injuries, I am reminded that it’s the “little things” that truly mean the most.Be genuine:  One of the first things that seemed to be the most noticeable was how genuine someone was being.  I never wanted to have someone’s pity, however it was extremely obvious when someone was being nice because they had to be.Smile:  I remember looking forward to the smiles of the doctors, nurses and volunteers in the waiting room at Brooke Army Medical Center.  It made me feel safe, it always lifted my spirits, and above all it was typically contagious.Journaling:  Offer this as an idea during conversation to the family member(s).  This may sound silly but there has been research done supporting the idea of keeping a daily journal, especially during times of stress. I kept one while I was with my wounded Soldier and I remember it becoming one of the most valuable tools I had.  A great stress reliever, and while it didn’t alleviate all stress; it did help, and it quickly became my release.  I didn’t write much, and I didn’t even write everyday, actually I didn’t always actually write, sometimes I would just “add a calendar event” on the particular day.  Either way, it helped and even now, 6 years later I will go back from time to time just to reread some of the thoughts.Eating and nutrition:  This may seem like a “no brainer” for many, but nutrition plays such an important role in our stress and anxiety management.  I remember there being days that I wouldn’t eat, especially in the beginning when my Soldier was first hurt.  I didn’t intentionally skip meals I just had way too much on my mind to worry about food.  Lack of eating and nutrition can lead to a host of other mental and physical issues that can further hinder care-taking abilities.  It doesn’t take but a second to check in with the family, or to give a friendly reminder that they too need a “lunch break”.Access to resources:  Make sure the family caregivers of the wounded service member have access or information regarding resources that may be helpful (i.e., Chaplin, therapist, counselors, gym, library, etc.).  Remember that a family may not be from the area of where their wounded service member is receiving care.   Some times just knowing where to go is reassuring enough for some, regardless of whether the information is ever utilized.Read the additional parts of the Military Caregiving mini series, 444 Days in the First Year, here:Part 2 – The Waiting RoomPart 3 – Unanswered QuestionsPart 4 – DecisionsPart 5 – Please Don’t Leave MePart 6 – Finalelast_img read more

ULCVs to Almost Double Capacity on AsiaNorth Europe by 2018

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first_imgAdditional phasing in of ultra-large container vessels (ULCV)– with a nominal capacity in excess of 18,000 TEU-on the Asia to North Europe trade lane could double their capacity share on the trade by next year, market intelligence provider in the container shipping industry SeaIntel says.There are 58 ultra-large vessels currently in operation, with 47 to be delivered – predominantly in 2017, and 2018.The mega container ships currently have a 35% deployment share of the trade, as carriers have been phasing in their 18,000 TEU+ sizes on Asia-Europe string as they eyed benefits of economies of scale. This has resulted in cascading of ships from the Asia-Europe trade since the launch of Maersk Line’s E-class ships 11 years ago.The yet to be delivered 47 newbuilds are expected to also be phased into the Asia-North Europe trade lane, according to  SeaIntel.“If the capacity deployed on this trade lane grows by 5% annually for the next two years, we will see the share of ultra-large vessels jump to 61% by the end of 2018 – double of what it is today,” SeaIntel said.The injection of larger vessels brings with itself a number of complications. Firstly, it will serve as a dampener on the future freight rate levels, as they to a significant degree will be influenced by the low slot costs offered by the ultra-large vessels.Secondly, it will increase the load on the ports and terminals although the number of containers that need to be handled won’t change.“The ultra-large container vessels lead to an increase in massive bursts of containers to be handled at once, rather than being spread across the week, which can pose a major challenge to ports and terminals, and downstream on the hinterland,” SeaIntel CEO, Alan Murphy said.Thirdly, assuming that the Asia-North Europe trade lane can only absorb an additional 5% capacity per year, the new mega-vessels being delivered will push out vessels currently in deployment, and as these vessels are too young to be considered for scrapping, they will have to be cascaded to other trade lanes, pushing the excess capacity to other markets.Image Courtesy: Screenshot/Insel Videolast_img read more