Tag Archives: 上海楼凤

John Mayer May Play On Jerry Garcia’s ‘Tiger’ Guitar With Dead & Co This Summer

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first_imgIn 2002, Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay made headlines by dropping close to one million dollars for the famed Tiger guitar used by Jerry Garcia from 1979-1989. The guitar had been kept on display in both Indiana museums and Irsay’s office throughout the years, but now it’s getting a new use: Dead & Company.The band, who just kicked off a summer tour with a free show in San Francisco, was contacted by Chris McKinney, who curates Irsay’s rare guitars and collectibles. Irsay sent the Tiger guitar to the Dead & Company rehearsals, though it has not yet been played, according to McKinney. The guitar only arrived yesterday afternoon, and the band had a show to play after all!According to the report in Indy Star, the guitar was sent for Dead & Company guitarist John Mayer to use in rehearsals and on tour. With Dead & Company’s tour heading to the Klipsch Music Center in Noblesville, IN on June 17th, the potential for Tiger’s appearance is at an all time high.“You know, the guitar was made to be played,” Weir said in a press conference back in April. “Even if it someday ends up in a museum, I think half the time it should be trotted out and played, because that’s what it was built to do. I know that Jerry would feel that way.” Weir went on to say that he would like to hang out with Irsay, and commented, “Hopefully he’ll be in town when we come through Indianapolis.”last_img read more

How the brain handles tools

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first_imgScientists have long known that the brain’s visual system shows considerable organization. Tests have repeatedly found that different parts of the brain are activated when people see different objects. Animals, body parts, tools, and large things such as houses, for example, are represented in different parts of the brain.What they haven’t known is how that specificity developed. Does the brain just know, innately, how to represent various domains of objects, or does experience play a critical role?The answer, Harvard scientists say, is that it’s largely innate. In recent years, research has shown that in people born blind, the visual system’s specificities are like those found in sighted individuals. This demonstrates that visual experience is not needed for the emergence of this organization. Because blind people do have experience in touching and using objects and tools, it raises the question of whether other sensory or motor experiences could be responsible for the specialization of the visual cortex in processing manipulable objects (e.g., a toothbrush, a comb, or a teapot) and actions.This possibility rests in an area of visual cortex that specializes in processing tools and hands, although their visual appearances are distinct. This region is well connected to a brain network engaged in the motor aspects of tool use, suggesting that its origins lie in the usefulness of processing both tools and hands because together they produce actions. But is this organization dependent on experience using hand tools, or is the brain specialization the product of experience over evolutionary time?In a recently published study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Ella Striem-Amit, Gilles Vannuscorps, and Alfonso Caramazza show that the brains of people born without hands (upper limb dysplasia) represent tools and hands much as do the brains of people born with hands. Thus the finding suggests that the connection between hands and tools is deeply ingrained in brain organization. Related Auditory cortex nearly identical in hearing and deaf people To explore brain organization in people born without hands, the researchers — who had previously studied people born without hands and found that their perception of hand actions was as fast and accurate as the perceptions of people born with hands — turned to functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI. The team recruited volunteers and tracked their brain activity as they were shown images of hands and feet, as well as images of tools and large, non-manipulable objects like tables and refrigerators.“What we were looking for were areas of conjoined selectivity,” Striem-Amit said. “Earlier studies had suggested that an area in the visual cortex shows selectivity both for viewing hands and tools. If that same overlap were present in those born without hands, it would support the idea that it is a foundational part of the brain’s organization.”“Of the five participants born without hands, four showed the signature hand-tool overlap, suggesting that the hand-tool overlap in the brain may be innate,” Vannuscorps said.Ultimately, the study suggests that for some foundational types of brain organization, experience is simply unnecessary. “The study of brain organization in individuals deprived of particular sensory or motor experience, such as the congenitally blind or individuals with upper-limb dysplasia, provides a crucial testing ground for the role of such experience in the functional organization of the human brain,” Caramazza said, “and it seems that its role is rather minor by comparison to the evolutionarily determined organization.”This research was supported with funding from Società Scienze Mente Cervello–Fondazione Cassa di Risparmio di Trento e Rovereto, the Provincia Autonoma di Trento, by a Harvard Provostial postdoctoral fund, the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme, and the Israel National Postdoctoral Award Program for Advancing Women in Science. Study shows architecture of audition likely based on innate factors last_img read more

Dorset’s Fiona Snook wins South West Golf Steward of the Year

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first_img12 Feb 2016 Dorset’s Fiona Snook wins South West Golf Steward of the Year Dorset’s Fiona Snook has been recognised as the Fuller’s London Pride Steward of the Year for England Golf’s South West region. Fiona, from Wareham Golf Club, received her trophy at the annual presentation lunch at The Counting House in London, when the national and regional winners were celebrated. The competition to find and recognise England’s top golf club stewards was in its ninth year and attracted hundreds of votes for the nominated stewards. Fiona commented: “I’m a newbie at the club and I’m so pleased to reach this final. Wareham is such a friendly club and everyone mucks in – you’re quite likely to see our president on a lawn mower! If you want anything you just have to ask.” Fiona is a qualified chef who has worked at Wareham for 18 months and has helped the club improve its image and appeal to visitors and members. Since she’s been there the club has attracted 56 new members. She’s overseen some clubhouse renovation, has changed the club’s brewery and suppliers, all the food is now home-made – and the increasing profits are reflecting her efforts. She runs a host of social events from darts and cribbage nights to a psychic supper and a chocolate night – all prominently advertised on display screens and a white board. That’s alongside weddings, birthday parties and a concert night with the Bournemouth brass band, which was promoted with a local leaflet drop.    Fiona has even taken up golf and joined the ladies’ section! Fiona and the other winners all received their trophies from England Golf Acting Chief Executive, Craig Wagstaff, and from Earl Baker, Fuller’s Sales Manager (Traditional Free Trade). The other winners were: national and South East winner, Steve Warren of Eaton Golf Club, Norfolk; Midlands winners Phill and Louise Maxwell of Radcliff-on-Trent; and North winner Kirsty Glaister of Stamford Golf Club, near Manchester. They were chosen after a rigorous judging process. The 2014 Stewards of the Year, Samantha Hudson, joined the judges to whittle down the entry to three finalists from each region. Each of these 12 were visited personally before the four regional winners were selected, having been judged on their commitment, innovation and standard of service and presentation, together with that extra special something which sets them apart. Caption: Fiona Snook with her trophy.last_img read more

Once again Hawks find way to defeat Nelson Leafs

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first_imgBy Bruce FuhrThe Nelson Daily SportsIn what is a preview to the first round the upcoming Kootenay International Junior Hockey League Murdoch Division playoffs, the Beaver Valley Nitehawks found another way to defeat the Nelson Leafs.A goal by Daniel Bishop at 12:42 of the third period stood up as the winner sparking the Nitehawks to a 3-2 KIJHL victory Saturday night at the NDCC Arena.Nelson opened the weekend Friday with a 6-4 victory over Spokane in the Lilac City.The win was the sixth in seven games for Beaver Valley, which opens the KIJHL playoffs against Nelson February 14 in Fruitvale.“I don’t know if there’s any secret, I think we’ve been fortunate in some games, we’ve had great goaltending in some games . . . some games our power play has been good and their goaltending hasn’t been that good,” said Beaver Valley head coach Terry Jones.“I think (Nelson) is a good team that has added some good players so I feel it’s going to be a close series when the playoffs start.”
 Nelson jumped all over the Hawks, out shooting the visitors 15-3 in the opening frame, but once again Beaver Valley backstop Zach Perehudoff shut the door.Taylor Love opened the scoring before Nelson finally saw some reward for all the hard work with 1:32 remaining in the frame. Cody Abbey, with his first of two, scored on the power play deadlocking the teams at 1-1 at the intermission.Leaf killer Ryon Sookro restored the Beaver Valley goal in the second with a power play marker. But Abbey once again tied the contest three minutes until recess.Nelson out shot the Hawks 29-20 in the game but saw it’s wide advantage dwindle in the third when Beaver Valley held an 11-6 margin.The teams do it all up again this afternoon in Beaver Valley to complete the season series.Stewart turns the heat up on former Spokane matesFormer Brave Joel Stewart continues to beat up on his old mates.The Spokane native scored twice to lead the Nelson Leafs to a 6-4 victory in Kootenay International Junior Hockey League action Friday night in the Lilac City.The win secures third place in the Murdoch Division for the Leafs. Spokane trails Nelson by 12 points in divisional standings with six games remaining on the schedule. But the Leafs lead the season-series tiebreaker 6-2.However, Friday’s win was not quite according to way Leaf coach Chris Shaw designed the contest on the drawing board.Nelson twice overcame two-goal deficits, taking over the game with five goals in the second period. The goals came in a span of 11 minutes.Of course the 20-year-old Stewart, traded to the Leafs earlier in the season, got the ball going in the right direction with a power play marker five minutes into the second, his second of the game.Cody Abby, Dallon Stoddart, Marcus Dahl and Walker Sidoni completed the onslaught for the Leafs.The goal for Stoddart, a grad of the Nelson Minor Hockey system, was his first since November 20 against Kamloops.Stoddart, finishing with two assists – his second straight two-point game — was his fifth of the season.Mitch Fowler, Van Stefanou, Rance Hughes and Jesse Collins replied for Spokane.Taylor O’Neil and Connor Enright each had two assists.Nelson returns home Saturday to face the Beaver Valley Nitehawks in the first game of a two-game home-and-home series. Game time is 7 p.m.ICE CHIPS: Colton Schell has overtaken injured Gavin Currie for the Leafs scoring lead. Schell has a point Friday in Spokane. Currie has been out of the lineup since December 31 . . .Joel Stewart, with 25 points in 22 games since coming to Nelson, is three points behind Schell. . . .The Leafs won three of four games against Spokane both home and away, out scoring the Braves 30-20. . . . Stewart has eight points against his former Spokane [email protected]last_img read more

Mallard’s Team of the Week — LVR Senior Bombers

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first_imgThe L.V. Rogers Bombers will make a run at a provincial berth during the Kootenay High School Senior Girl’s Basketball Zone tournament this weekend in Castlegar.The Bombers, the top ranked team in the Kootenay zone, take to the court for an important semi final match Saturday, followed by the final, if successful, Mallard’s Source for sports would like to give the Bombers a boost with Team of the Week honours.The members of the team include Sian Nielsen, Shannon Oothuyzen, Allie Zondervan, Naomi Perkins, Ansleigh Dergousoff, Christina Champlin, Roxanne Baker, Katherine Bailey, Katharina Schmidt (Germany), Claire Young and coaches Chris Dergousoff and Willis Parnell.last_img read more

Brighton boss Hughton denies move for Celtic star

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first_imgEmbed from Getty ImagesChris Hughton has denied reports that Brighton have made a move to try to sign Moussa Dembele from Celtic.The striker has been linked with a number of clubs since joining the Glasgow side from Fulham.Speaking after his team’s 2-0 defeat at Chelsea, Seagulls boss Hughton insisted no approach had been made by his club for Dembele.“Certainly as the manager of the football club I’m sure I would know, but there certainly has not been contact between the clubs, so that’s classed as speculation,” Hughton said.“As we get to January the names are going to be thick and fast, but at the moment they are all speculation.”Hughton’s team defended resolutely at Stamford Bridge but Chelsea broke the deadlock courtesy of Alvaro Morata’s header 52 seconds into the second half.Marcos Alonso’s goal on the hour mark sealed a deserved win for the Blues.“The game went as we would have expected, with them having a lot of possession,” Hughton said.“What disappointed me most was the timing of the first goal and the fact that the second was from a set piece.” Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Sharks vs. Golden Knights: “There’s always a little bit of extra juice”

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first_imgSAN JOSE — Forwards Logan Couture and Melker Karlsson and goalie Martin Jones will all play their first game of the preseason Saturday when the Sharks host the Vegas Golden Knights at SAP Center at 5 p.m.The Sharks players who are dressing against the Golden Knights did not skate Saturday morning, so there was no indication of what the forward lines or defense pairs will look like at the start of the game. But Jones is expected to play all 60 minutes and Aaron Dell is the backup goalie.This …last_img read more

Bringing music to the youth

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first_imgJabu Kunene, seen here at the Gauteng Camerata auditions, has passed his Grade Five music theory exam, and says he’d like to continue playing for as long as possible. The Masote family – Sheila, Kutlwano and Michael – have nurtured the musical aspirations of hundreds of young South Africans.(Images: Janine Erasmus) The Soweto Youth Orchestra in action.(Image: Acosa) Abel Selaocoe, a promising cellist, earned himself a scholarship to the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester.(Image: Al Jazeera)MEDIA CONTACTS • Acosa+27 11 472 7413Janine ErasmusFormal music training and classical music was at one time in South Africa viewed as the domain of the elite, but in recent years a number of organisations have worked to tap into the wealth of musical talent in South African communities. The African Cultural Association of South Africa (Acosa) is one of them.The non-profit organisation, based on the West Rand, was established in 1947 and its vision remains the same as it was back then – to reach out to the community in the form of formal music education, both choral and instrumental, and to bring music lovers together to create beautiful sounds.Acosa today is headed by South African music legends Michael and Sheila Masote. Distinguished National Order laureate Michael is a pioneer in the development of youth orchestras and choral ensembles – he was the first black South African to complete a BMus degree from Unisa, and brought classical music on a wide scale to Soweto with the formation of the Soweto Youth Orchestra.It is said that he taught himself how to conduct the orchestra by disguising himself as a janitor and sneaking into the rehearsals of the former National Symphony Orchestra at the city hall in Johannesburg.The Soweto Youth Orchestra evolved into the semi-professional Soweto Symphony Orchestra, which in turn produced world-class successes such as trumpeter Prince Lengoasa and the evergreen Soweto String Quartet, all of whom learned their trade under Michael Masote.Now Masote is inspiring a new generation of musicians – including his own children and one of his grandchildren – with his work as director of music at Acosa. This organisation, too, has spawned musical talent such as the all-girl Ntombizodwa String Ensemble, who have performed for Queen Elizabeth II, among others, and sensational young cellist Abel Selaocoe from Sebokeng, who is presently studying at the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester, on a scholarship.They are proof that music is for everyone, and are the living embodiment of everything that Acosa stands for.“Acosa aims to create youth orchestras where everyone has access,” says Sheila Masote. “We provide teachers if the musician doesn’t have one, and we also want to train more teachers. Too many kids need teachers, and there are not enough good teachers to go around.”The demand for tuition is immense. “We can’t stretch ourselves far enough,” she adds.A sense of belongingBesides the Soweto Youth and Soweto Symphony orchestras, Acosa has established a number of other ensembles over the years – they include the Soweto Children’s Orchestra, the Acosa Wind Band, the Acosa Brass Ensemble, and most recently the Gauteng Camerata, a youth development orchestra of 20-somethings.“The kids get a sense of belonging to a group that gives back to the community,” explains Michael Masote. “They feel unique, and they feel hope for the future.”Accomplished Acosa alumni have taught and studied overseas, and graduates of the wind and brass groups have been accepted into the highly rated national bands of the South African navy, army and police.Auditions are currently under way for the Camerata, with one of the goals being to recruit wind and brass players to add to the string ensemble, as this will also enable the expansion of the repertoire. The first round has just concluded, but there will be more auditions in the near future.If you’re a young musician who’s interested in auditioning for this vibrant ensemble, contact Acosa for more details on 011 472 7413, email [email protected], or visit the website.Bringing music to the peopleAcosa’s motto is “Ke fa go re o fe” (Setswana, meaning “power is knowledge diffused to others”). In keeping with this sentiment, the organisation has plans to go national, which will uncover more homegrown musical talent, and encourage the further documentation of South African music.In the meantime, it works in Gauteng through various venues including the Soweto Music Conservatoire, which has a colourful history of its own, starting up in 1947 in the home of choral conductor and, later, Pan Africanist Congress president Zepheniah Mothopeng – Sheila Masote’s father – in defiance of the apartheid laws of the time.The Soweto conservatoire concept has been duplicated in the Acosa Tsa Lapeng Conservatoire near Hammanskraal in northern Gauteng, and the Acosa Sebokeng Music School at Mojalathuto Primary School in Sebokeng, about 57km south of Johannesburg. The organisation also gives classes in four primary schools in Soweto, and at its main facility, Acosa House, in Roodepoort.Acosa teaches choral and classical music on instruments such as the cello, violin, viola, double bass, guitar and piano. Not all students can afford their own instrument, and in these cases Acosa is able to arrange the extended loan of instruments to deserving musicians. Exams are set according to the Royal School of Music in London.Musicians are expected to be committed to and serious about their art. “This is not recreational music,” says Kutlwano Masote, son of Michael and Sheila, and mentor and conductor of the Camerata.“We aim to instil a sense of excellence in our musicians, which will help them to get bursaries to schools such as St John’s College, which teaches music as an academic subject and as an extracurricular activity.”The younger Masote is a pioneer too, graduating from the International Menuhin Music Academy in Switzerland and becoming the first black member of the National Symphony Orchestra in 1998.Acosa has received funding from the National Lotteries Board – this has been allocated to the purchase of a permanent home for the school, the further development of its music programmes, and minibuses to transport musicians and equipment to and from their homes in places as far away from the school as Daveyton on the East Rand, and Sebokeng.Next in the plan is a media centre, which will allow the young musicians to learn music software such as Sibelius. They can then create their own arrangements and learn to compose.“We envision six or seven terminals,” says Kutlwano Masote, adding that it’s not all work for the students, as there are fun activities too and hopefully, a tour to Botswana in the coming months.last_img read more

Farm Credit Mid-America awards scholarships to college students from Ohio

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Sixteen Ohio college students who are majoring in agriculture and business-related disciplines received scholarships from Farm Credit Mid-America. Scholarships of $1,000 or $1,500 were awarded based on academic record, leadership qualities, and community and school involvement. These awards are part of the organziation’s commitment to develop future leaders in agriculture.“Ushering in the next generation of agriculture is an important part of Farm Credit’s mission to secure the future of our industry, and rewarding standout students is one way of recognizing the achievements of Ohio youth,” said Tara Durbin, senior vice president, financial services. “As future leaders of rural communities and farming, we are eager to support students who strive to achieve success in education and who have a passion for agriculture.”In total, Farm Credit Mid-America awarded 62 college scholarships across its four-state territory of Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee. Scholarships were awarded to customers’ children and grandchildren who are pursuing degrees related to agriculture. Farm Credit also offers scholarships at 16 universities across its four-state territory.Scholarship recipients from Ohio are listed below, along with each student’s hometown and college:• Anna-Marie Stiver of Homerville, University of Dayton• Grant Michael of Baltimore, Ohio State University – Newark• Kyle Daugherty of Fresno, Ohio State University ATI• Kristine Culler of Edgerton, Wilmington College• Katie Frost of Bloomingburg, The Ohio State University• Drew Lament of Lakeview, Eastern Michigan University• Sarah Ann Landis of Farmersville, The Ohio State University• Lindsey Campbell of Minerva, The Ohio State University• Philip Eberly of Wooster, The Ohio State University• Evan Smith of Canal Winchester, Ohio State University ATI• Monique Adam of Howard, University of Findlay• Isaac Inkrott of Leipsic, Ohio Northern University• Garrett Stanfield of Manchester, Redlands Community College in Oklahoma• Justin Haerr of Springfield, The Ohio State University• Erin Gaerke of Russia, The Ohio State University• Sydney Hoffa of Massillon, Auburn UniversityFor additional information on Farm Credit Mid-America’s community engagement efforts, visit e-farmcredit.com/community.last_img read more

Top talents now available for Gilas as PBA opens next season in December

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first_imgRobredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Celtics ink Paul Pierce to one-day contract Bracketed with Australia, Chinese Taipei and Japan, the Philippines will play games in those countries starting in November, before hosting the Aussies, the Taiwanese and the Japanese in games in Manila.The new scheduled is an arduous one and will have Gilas playing two games each in November, February and June next year.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsWith the new PBA opening schedule, the league also penciled its calendar to be playing elimination round games in the February and June playdates so as not to jeopardize title chances of teams where Gilas players will come from.Participation of the PBA’s veteran stars in the next Gilas event, the Fiba Asia Championship in Lebanon near the end of August, still hangs in the balance as it will run smack into the season-ending Governors’ Cup that opens this Wednesday. National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress El Nido residents told to vacate beach homes FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ MOST READ Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ LATEST STORIES Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’center_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plant Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. June Mar Fajardo of San Miguel Beer, the reigning three-time PBA MVP, Terrence Romeo of GlobalPort, Japeth Aguilar of Barangay Ginebra and Calvin Abueva of Alaska are just some of the names considered shoo-ins for Gilas in its toughest international tournaments.Gilas sent its team of Cadets and several amateurs led by Ray Parks and Kiefer Ravena to the Jones Cup here where the Filipinos hold a 2-1 record going into a clash with Japan’s Under-24 team at 1 p.m. on Tuesday.This same squad – save for import Mike Myers – will be flying to Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia to defend the Southeast Asian Games gold medal.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netTAIPEI – Team Philippines is assured of being represented by its best when the World Cup Qualifying starts in November as the PBA has agreed to push back the opening of its next season to December.This move, plans of which came out in an Inquirer reports several weeks back, was approved when the league’s board met a few days ago as the PBA does its part in helping Gilas Pilipinas come up with the best selection possible.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more