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Women’s golf ties for third after strong finish

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first_imgThe No. 1 Women’s golf team rode an excellent final round to a tie for third place at the Mason Rudolph Championship in Franklin, Tenn.The team fired a 10-under-par 278 in the final round to finish at 13-under 851 (286-287- 278) at the Legends Golf Club. That final round was tied with No. 16 LSU’s first round for the lowest in the tournament, and it brought the team up from its eighth place position to start theday.“We didn’t have a fast start, but the team stayed focused,” USC coach Andrea Gaston said. “It was great to see the girls rally.”The round — 10-under par — is the best in Gaston’s USC career, tied with last season’s first round at the Mason Rudolph. USC’s history of success here is promising because the Legends Golf Club will host the 2012 NCAA championship.The Women of Troy were led by junior transfer Lisa McCloskey, who finished in a tie for fourth at 5-under-par 209 (70-72-67). Her final round was the team’s lowest of the tournament, featuring only one bogey amid six birdies. McCloskey, a two-time All-American at Pepperdine, now has two straight fourth place finishes in her first two tournaments for the Women of Troy.Senior Lizette Salas bounced back from a rough first round to finish tied for 21st at 2- under-par 214 (76-68-70). Two bogeys in her last four holes undid a good first nine for her final round, but she birdied 18 to get back to 2-under on the day. Salas, going for a program record fourth All-American award this season, has never finished lower than 25th in her four appearances at the Mason Rudolph.Junior Inah Park finished her season debut tied for 23rd at 1-under-par 215 (71-75-69). Park closed strong in the final round, birdying 17 and 18 after as part of a 3-under round.Sophomore Cyna Rodriguez finished tied for 26th at even-par 216 (72-72-72) in a remarkably consistent tournament. Three bogeys on the front nine were balanced by three birdies on the back nine in her final round.Rounding out the team’s roster was freshman Rachel Morris, who tied for 78th at 14-over-par 230 (73-76-81). Morris couldn’t overcome two double bogeys during her final round that is her worst in two tournaments for USC.Gaston said she was proud of her team for rallying despite the 13-stroke deficit it faced after the second round.“They were locked in and focused on each and every shot,” Gaston said.The Women of Troy put on a show for the final nine holes, where the top four members of the team combined to go 10-under on the back nine to close the tournament.“They played lights out,” Gaston said.The Women of Troy now have eight days before going back on the road and heading to the Edean Ihlanfeldt Invitational at the Tacoma Country Club in Tacoma, Wash from Oct. 4-6.last_img read more

Double gold for Georgia on GB’s Sensational Sunday

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first_img16 Jan 2013 Double gold for Georgia on GB’s Sensational Sunday Georgia aims for gold for Team GB 19th January 2013 England’s Georgia Hall is leading the gold medal hunt for Team GB in the girls’ golf championship at the Australian Youth Olympic Festival in Sydney. The 16-year-old European number one holds a three-shot lead, with one round left to play, after she scored four-under 68 in the third round at Twin Creeks Golf Club. Georgia (Remedy Oak) has also helped GB into pole position in the team event, where they lead Australia by four strokes.  Georgia’s scores count towards the team total alongside those of Chloe Williams of Wales and the Scots pair, Ewan Scott and Bradley Neil, But, before they could look ahead to continuing their challenge for team gold they had to survive a disqualification drama Team GB official Tegwen Matthews commented: “‘Super Saturday’, as traditionally referred to in the Olympics, very nearly turned into ‘Shocking Saturday’ for TeamGB. She explained: “A group, including Ewan Scott and Bradley Neil, teed off from an incorrect teeing ground on the short 6th hole. The tee had been moved some 30 yards left of its previous position and the group had not been advised of the change of tee or yardage. “Under the R&A rules of golf, the penalty is disqualification. Following an appeal, the committee reviewed the decision and, following discussion with R&A representatives, the disqualification was waived under ‘exceptional circumstances’, having found precedent from a similar incident in an international qualifying event. “The group of three, which included an Australian player, were asked to replay that hole from the correct tee. The score recorded from the hole, to stand as the correct score for the re-instated players.” Bradley finished with a three-under score of 69 and Ewan posted a level par 72. Tegwen added: “Everyone concerned was entirely grateful, most especially Team GB, and I think we can safely say, that every teeing ground will now be examined with extreme diligence!” The incident added to a turbulent day all round. At the start of play Five Team GB players still had to complete their second rounds, following a suspension because of record temperatures. England’s Ashton Turner finished on four-under par 68, to keep his lead in the boys’ individual. Scotland’s Lauren Whyte holed a15-footer on the last, to loud cheers from her teammates, to post a superb five-under par 67. So, at the halfway  stage she was one of four GB players tied at the top of the girls’ leaderboard, alongside Georgia, Chloe and England’s Gabriella Cowley. As the third round got underway, temperatures dropped to 23 degrees – half those of the previous day – and were accompanied by showers and a challenging breeze. Georgia made her move with her fine 68 and is three shots clear of Australia, while Gabriella, who scored 73, is currently in the bronze medal position. England’s Amber Ratcliffe fired her tournament best of 70 and will be looking to improve on that again on the final day. Ashton Turner was disappointed with his 74, which dropped him into bronze position, behind Australia and China, but he’ll be hunting for gold in the final round. Fellow England players Jack Singh-Brar and Harry Ellis, shot their first sub-par rounds of the tournament, with 67 and 70 respectively. Tegwen commented: “Team GB spirits were revived following the boys’ re-instatement and everyone is in exactly the right frame of mind to maximise their performance tomorrow and contribute to the ever growing haul of medals from all the other Team GB athletes. “Let’s make it ‘Super Sunday’ for Team GB golf!” Leading scores. Par 72 Girls -5 Georgia Hall (Team GB, Remedy Oak) 71 72 68 -2 Celina Yuan (Australia) 72 73 69 E Gabriella Cowley (Team GB, Brocket Hall) 71 72 73 +1 Jienalin Zhang (China) 73 75 69 +2 Chloe Williams (Team GB, Wales) 74 69 75 +3 Danting Cai (China) 72, 76, 71; Lauren Whyte (Team GB, Scotland)  76 67 76, Weiwei Zhang (China) 75 73 71, Wenyung Keh (New Zealand) 76 71 72 +4 Amber Ratcliffe (Team GB, Royal Cromer) 75 75 70 Boys -15 Kevin Yuan (Australia) 69 68 64 -11 Zecheng Dou (China) 69 67 69 -10 Ashton Turner (Team GB, Kenwick Park) 64 68 74 -9 Brett Coletta (Australia) 70 67 70; Compton Pikari (New Zealand) 70 68 69 -8 Bradley Neil (Team GB, Scotland) 69 70 69 -7 Jin Zhang (China) 67 68 74 -5 Blake Proverbs (Australia) 74 66 71; Cheng Jin (China) 71 70 70; Ewan Scott (Team GB, Scotland) 72 67 72 -4 David Micheluzzi (Australia) 71 70 71 -3 Jack Singh-Brar (Team GB, Brokenhurst Manor) 73 73 67 -2 Harry Ellis (Team GB, Meon Valley) 72 72 70   Blistering heat forces suspension in Australia 18 January 2013 Blistering temperatures forced play to be suspended today in the second round of the golf championship at the Australian Youth Olympic Festival – but Team GB are coping well. Team leader Kyle Phillpots reported: “The weather forecast had promised high temperatures and by 8am it was 30C (86F); by 10am it was 40C (104F) and when it reached an area record of 45C (113F) at 12.30, play was suspended for the day. “This left players with up to four holes still to play and the round will be resumed at 6.45am tomorrow. “Despite the intensity of the weather the GB players were not to be deterred. Taking every advantage to find natural shade many of them also used their umbrellas to block out the direct sun. They also were constantly supplied with cold towels and of course, plenty of fluids.” Five Team GB players have completed their rounds at Twin Creeks Golf Club, Sydney: the England trio of Harry Ellis (Meon Valley), Georgia Hall (Remedy Oak) and Gabriella Cowley (Meon Valley) all returned scores of level par 72. Chloe Williams of Wales made up for her disappointment of a first round 74, with an excellent three-under 69, while Scotland’s Ewan Scott was even better on five-under. Of those still on the course, Jack Singh-Brar (Brokenhurst Manor) is one over with four to play and Bradley Neil of Scotland is on three under with two to play. Fellow Scot, Lauren White, was also three-under and had reached the 15th tee when play was halted. Amber Ratcliffe (Royal Cromer) was two-under when she marked her ball on the 15th green. The overnight leader, England boy international Ashton Turner continued his good form and stands at four under for the round with one hole to play. The highlight of another excellent performance from the Kenwick Park player came when he drove the green at the 433 yard 8th hole. “I knew I had hit it well, but not that well,” said Ashton. “I was looking for my ball from around 100 yards out, I couldn’t believe it when I saw it was on the green. That’s certainly my longest drive in competition.” Kyle Phillpots added: “There’s plenty more to come from this team – and the temperatures tomorrow will be much cooler.” After the first round Team GB were leading the men’s and women’s individual events and tied first with Australia in the team competition.   Team GB take lead in Australia 17th January 2013 Team GB, led by England players, made a sizzling start to top all three leaderboards after the first round of the golf championship at the Australian Youth Olympic Festival (AYOF). Boy international Ashton Turner scored a superb eight-under par 64 at Twin Creeks Golf Club, Sydney, to lead the boys’ event by three. European number one Georgia Hall of Dorset and fellow international Gabriella Cowley, from Essex, both returned one-under 71 to top the girls’ leaderboard. Ashton, from Lincolnshire, said afterwards: “I am really pleased with my performance, it was a great start to the tournament and there are plenty of shots left out there, so I can push on tomorrow. “The heat out here is a big difference compared to home but you’ve just got to keep drinking water, keep putting the sun cream on and make sure we don’t get burnt. “It is an honour to represent Team GB at golf for the first time in over 100 years. I think the sport definitely deserves its space on the Olympic programme and it’s great to be part of the team that has introduced it back in again.” Ashton holds a three shot lead over China, followed closely by New Zealand on 68 and a host of players on 69, including Team GB member Bradley Neil. Meanwhile, Georgia and Gabriella are one shot clear of players from China and Australia who had level par scores of 72. Team GB are also tied first with Australia in the team event, thanks to the scores of Georgia Hall, Chloe Williams of Wales (74) and the Scots pair Bradley Neil and Ewan Scott (72). The team’s scores were compiled in temperatures are as hot as the golf. Play started at 7.30am and by mid-morning the mercury had risen to 35 degrees. Team official Tegwen Matthews commented afterwards: “All the players felt they left some shots out there – including Ashton who bogeyed the last in his scintillating 64! “However, with three more rounds to complete, there is plenty of opportunity for them to maximise their performance – and they are just itching to get out there and do just that!” Team GB individual scores. Par 72 Boys 64 Ashton Turner (Kenwick Park) 69 Bradley Neil (Scotland)      72 Ewan Scott  (Scotland), Harry Ellis (Meon Valley) 73 Jack Singh-Brar (Brokenhurst Manor) Girls 71 Georgia Hall  (Remedy Oak), Gabriella Cowley (Brocket Hall) 74 Chloe Williams (Wales) 75 Amber Ratcliffe (Royal Cromer) 76 Lauren Whyte  (Scotland)   Team GB prepare to tee off in Australia 16th January 2013 Team GB golfers – who include six English players – tee off tomorrow in the golf championship at the Australian Youth Olympic Festival (AYOF). Dorset’s Georgia Hall, the GB flag bearer at the opening ceremony, and her nine team-mates will be the first Team GB competitors in the sport of golf for over 100 years. Golf featured in the 1900 and 1904 Games and is returning to Olympic competition at the Rio 2016 Games. They will take on the challenge of Australia, New Zealand and China over 72 holes at the Twin Creeks Golf course in Ludenham, Sydney. They’re well prepared for what lies ahead. Golf team leader Kyle Phillpots said: “After four days of getting used to the heat, time difference and the course, the golfers are fully prepared and looking forward to the Youth Olympic challenge. “They are all fit, happy with their game and swinging well. They are all enjoying playing the course and there is no reason why they shouldn’t be successful. They all have the potential to reach the medal podium.” There are men’s and women’s individual competitions and a team event. The golf team includes six English players. They are Jack Singh-Brar (Brokenhurst Manor), Gabriella Cowley (Brocket Hall), Harry Ellis (Meon Valley), Georgia Hall (Remedy Oak), Amber Ratcliffe (Royal Cromer) and Ashton Turner (Kenwick Park). The line-up is completed by Bradley Neil, Ewan Scott and Lauren Whyte of Scotland and by Chloe Williams of Wales. It was Sensational Sunday for Team GB golfers with a haul of medals at the Australian Youth Olympic Festival in Sydney – and a historic double gold for England’s Georgia Hall. She became Team GB’s first gold medallist in an Olympic golf event for over a hundred years when she won both the individual women’s competition and team gold with compatriots Chloe Williams of Wales and the Scots pair Ewan Scott and Bradley Neil. England boy international Ashton Turner won silver in the men’s individual event while Chloe Williams won the bronze in the women’s competition. They helped Team GB to win a record breaking 40 medals in a single day and brought Great Britain’s overall total to 66 medals, comprising a superb 19 gold, 23 silver and 24 bronze medals. Georgia Hall – the European number one and world number four – went in to the final day at Twin Creeks golf course leading by three shots and could barely hold back the tears after her last putt when she realised she had done enough to secure the gold medal. The 16-year-old from Remedy Oak in Dorset said: “It feels amazing to have made history. I enjoyed it a lot and it was a great experience for me. I cried after the last hole because I was just happy it was over to be honest. It was a long week and I just wanted to make sure I won, so the pressure was there. “My aim all week was to not shoot over par and I did that, so I am pleased with my performance on the whole and to get a double gold medal in the individual and the team is fantastic. “I think the Rio 2016 Olympic Games is definitely closer for me now, having come to Australia. It gives me a hint of the style of competition and what to expect from everything that comes with it and hopefully I can make it in three years’ time.” She scored a final round of one-under 71 for a six-under total and a two stroke winning margin over Australia’s Celina Yuan. Chloe Williams returned an excellent four-under 68 to take the bronze on two-under overall. In the men’s event, Ashton Turner shot a superb five-under 67 to claim the silver medal, having been in a podium position all week. He finished on 15-under par and was three strokes behind gold medallist Kevin Yuan of Australia. Great Britain won the team gold by 12 shots over Australia – having been in first place throughout the event. They were tied with Australia after the first day but led by six shots after the second day and eight shots after the third. New Zealand won the bronze medal. Reflecting on Great Britain’s record breaking performance Chef de Mission Mark England said: “This has been an unforgettable five days for Team GB’s young athletes. Winning 66 medals is a truly remarkable accomplishment and one that the whole of Team GB can be extremely proud of. They have coped very well with the challenging conditions and extreme temperatures to produce record breaking results” He added: “A special mention goes to the golfers and in particular our Opening Ceremony Flag Bearer Georgia Hall, who created history by winning the first golf gold medals in an Olympic event for over a hundred years.” Image shows Georgia Hall and Ashton Turner Final GB individual scores. Par 72 Women Gold medal Georgia Hall (Remedy Oak) -6 (71 72 68 71) Bronze medal Chloe Williams (Wales) -2 (74 69 75 68) 5th Gabriella Cowley (Brocket Hall) +1 (71 72 73 73) 8th Amber Ratcliffe (Royal Cromer) +5 (75 75 70 73) 9th Lauren Whyte (Scotland) +6 (76 67 76 75) Men Silver medal Ashton Turner (Kenwick Park) -15 (64 68 74 67) 4th Bradley Neil (Scotland) -11 (69 70 69 69) 8th Ewan Scott -8 (72 67 72 69) 9th Harry Ellis (Meon Valley) -7 (72 72 70 67) 12th Jack Singh–Brar (Brokenhurst Manor) -1 (73 73 67 74)last_img read more

Local Red Cross Deploys Volunteers To East Coast

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first_imgFacebook8Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by American Red Cross, Mount Rainier ChapterTACOMA, WA, Wednesday, October 31, 2012 — On what is normally a day of Halloween festivities, the Mt. Rainier Red Cross team has been prepping and deploying volunteers to head east to respond to the multiple states devastated by Hurricane Sandy.  So far, more than 9,000 people spent Tuesday night in 171 Red Cross shelters in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, West Virginia, Vermont, New Hampshire, Indiana, and Ohio.“This response to Sandy is just getting started. The storm has left devastation in its wake and we will be helping people for weeks to come,” said Tracy Peacock, Mount Rainier Red Cross Chapter Executive.  “This will be very costly and the Red Cross needs help now. We ask everyone to support us as we help people recover from this massive storm.”One of the first local volunteers from Western Washington, a Shelter Supervisor from Thurston County, was deployed last Friday to Pennsylvania. This week the Mount Rainier Red Cross Chapter has deployed eight volunteers so far.Red Cross Volunteers will work long days for several weeks to provide shelter, food, first aid, and emotional support. Alena Golubkova, Casework Coordinator for the Mount Rainier Chapter of the Red Cross, will be flying to Brunswick, New Jersey Thursday. Golubkova flies out from Sea-Tac Airport at 6:39 a.m. to help provide food to those affected by the hurricane. Dr. Tobi Buckman will be deploying from Grays Harbor County to provide Disaster Mental Health Services. Buckman will be flying out Thursday at 11:10 p.m. from Sea-Tac Airport to White Plains, New York.HOW PEOPLE CAN HELP Those who want to help can make a donation to support American Red Cross Disaster Relief by visiting www.redcross.org or calling 1-800-RED-CROSS. To make a donation locally, people can call the Mount Rainier Chapter at 253-474-0400. People can also text REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. Contributions may also be sent to the Mt. Rainier Chapter at 1235 South Tacoma Way Tacoma, WA 98409 or to the American Red Cross, P.O. Box 37243, Washington, DC 20013.HOW TO FIND RED CROSS SHELTERS People who have been forced to evacuate can find out where Red Cross shelters are open by going to www.redcross.org or accessing the free Red Cross phone app. Both are refreshed with updated information every 30 minutes. Residents can also monitor local media—radio, newspaper and television—to find out where local shelters are located.REGISTER ON SAFE AND WELL The Red Cross Safe and Well website is also available. People affected by the fires and flooding can access the site and let loved ones know where they are. There are several ways to register on Safe and Well, or search for a loved one. From a computer, visit redcross.org; from a smart phone, visit www.redcross.org/safeandwell or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) to be connected with one’s local Red Cross chapter.About the American Red Cross:The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org.To stay up to date with what is going on at the Mount Rainier Chapter of the American Red Cross, go to www.redcross.org/raineir, like us on Facebook athttps://www.facebook.com/RedCrossRainier and follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/RedCrossRainier.last_img read more

Ebola Economic Shock Already Serious

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first_imgShort Term Impact 2014 $359 million Guinea $59 million (1.2 pp) $439 million (8.9 pp) Medium-term impact(2015 – Low Ebola) Liberia $142 million (2.3 pp) Sierra Leone $66 million (3.4 pp) – $43 million (1.0 pp) Medium-term impact(2015 – High Ebola) $97 million A World Bank Group’s analysis of the Ebola epidemic released Wednesday, September 17, finds that if the virus continues to surge in the three worst-affected countries – Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone – its economic impact could grow eight-fold, dealing a potentially catastrophic blow to the already fragile states in the West African sub-region. The analysis, however, finds that economic costs can be limited if swift national and international responses succeed in containing the epidemic and mitigating “aversion behavior” – a fear factor, it observes, resulting from peoples’ concerns about contagion, which is fueling the economic impact.In a statement on the Ebola epidemic, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim said, “The primary cost of this tragic outbreak is in human lives and suffering, which has already been terribly difficult to bear. But our findings make clear that the sooner we get an adequate containment response and decrease the level of fear and uncertainty, the faster we can blunt Ebola’s economic impact.”“We have seen in recent days a serious scaling up on the part of international donors to contain the Ebola epidemic. Today’s report underscores the huge potential costs of the epidemic if we don’t ramp up our efforts to stop it now,” said Kim.The analysis uses two alternative scenarios to estimate the medium-term impact of the epidemic to the end of calendar year 2015. A “Low Ebola” scenario envisions rapid containment within the three core countries, while “High Ebola” corresponds to the upper ranges of current epidemiological estimates. Please see below a chart highlighting the World Bank’s estimates of impacts on output individually and in aggregate. Estimates of impacts on output individually and in aggregate, in the short term (2014) and medium term (2015) $163 million (3.3 pp) $130 million (2.1 percentage point) Core Three Countrie $809 million $228 million (11.7 pp) $82 million (4.2 pp) Entries are in current US dollars (with percentage points of GDP in brackets where appropriate).The analysis estimates the short-term impact on output to be 2.1 percentage points of gross domestic product (GDP) in Guinea (reducing growth from 4.5 percent to 2.4 percent); 3.4 percentage points in Liberia (reducing growth from 5.9 percent to 2.5 percent); and 3.3 percentage points in Sierra Leone (reducing growth from 11.3 percent to 8 percent).This forgone output corresponds to US$359 million in 2014 prices.  However, if Ebola is not contained, these estimates rise to US$809 million in the three countries alone, the Bank said. In Liberia, the hardest hit country, the ‘High Ebola’ scenario sees output hit 11.7 percentage points in 2015 (reducing growth from 6.8 percent to -4.9 percent).The short-term fiscal impacts are also large, at US$93 million for Liberia (4.7 percent of GDP); US$79 million for Sierra Leone (1.8 percent of GDP); and US$120 million for Guinea (1.8 percent of GDP). Slow containment gaps would almost certainly lead to even greater financing gaps in 2015, the analysis finds.Inflation and food prices were initially contained but are now rising in response to shortages, panic buying, and speculation.  Those families already vulnerable to food price shocks are becoming increasingly exposed. Exchange rate volatility has increased in all three countries, particularly since June, fueled by uncertainty and some capital flight, the Bank added.The analysis finds that the largest economic effects of the crisis are not as a result of the direct costs (mortality, morbidity, caregiving, and the associated losses to working days) but rather those resulting from aversion behavior driven by fear of contagion. This in turn leads to a fear of association with others and reduces labor force participation, closes places of employment, disrupts transportation, and motivates some government and private decision-makers to close sea ports and airports. In the recent history of infectious disease outbreaks such as the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) epidemic of 2002-2004 and the H1N1 flu epidemic of 2009, the analysis notes that behavioral effects have been responsible for as much as 80 – 90 percent of the total economic impact of the epidemics.The findings of the analysis underline the need for a concerted international response.  External financing is clearly needed in the three core countries, and the impact estimates suggest that containment and mitigation expenditures as high as several billion dollars would be cost-effective if they successfully avert the worse scenario. The analysis describes four related activities such a response should include:Humanitarian support Such as desperately needed, personal protective equipment and hazard pay for health workers, emergency treatment units, standardized and universally applied protocols for care, etc.Fiscal supportThe fiscal gap, just for 2014, is estimated at around US$290 million. Increased injections of external support can strengthen growth in these fragile economies.Screening facilities at airports and seaportsPolicies are required that will enable the flow of relief and encourage commercial exchange with the affected countries.Strengthening the surveillance, detection, and treatment capacity of African health systemsWeak health sectors in Africa are a threat not only to their own citizens but also to their trading partners and the world at large.  The enormous economic cost of the current outbreak could be avoided by prudent ongoing investment in health system strengthening.The World Bank Group, meanwhile disclosed that it is mobilizing a total $230 million financing package for the three countries hardest hit by the Ebola crisis, which will help contain the spread of infections, help communities cope with the economic impact of the crisis, and improve public health systems throughout West Africa. The World Bank is supporting country responses in line with the World Health Organization (WHO) Roadmap, and is coordinating assistance closely with the UN and other international and country partners. As of mid-September 2014, of the pledged US$230 million, the Bank declared that it has mobilized US$117 million for the emergency response, which includes IDA grants of US$58 million for Liberia, US$34 million for Sierra Leone, and US$25 million for Guinea. The IDA, or the International Development Association, is the Bank’s fund for the world’s poorest countries. These funds, the Bank explained, are paying for essential supplies and drugs, personal protective equipment and infection prevention control materials, health workers training, hazard pay and death benefits to Ebola health workers and volunteers, contact tracing, vehicles, data management equipment and door-to-door public health education outreach. Additional support will help strengthen countries’ health systems and capacity to delivery essential health services, along with disease surveillance and laboratory networks to guard against future outbreaks.The World Bank Group is a vital source of financial and technical assistance to developing countries around the world, with the goals of ending extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity. Improving people’s health is integral to achieving these goals. The Bank Group provides financing, state-of-the-art analysis, and policy advice to help countries expand access to quality, affordable health care; protect people from falling into poverty or worsening poverty due to illness; and promote investments in all sectors that form the foundation of healthy societies.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

A peek into the merging galaxy cluster Abell 3888

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first_img(Phys.org)—Studying substructures of galaxy clusters can reveal important information about the morphology and evolution processes of these gravity-bound groups of galaxies. Optical spectroscopy is very helpful in this matter, capable of unraveling the history of large-scale structure formation in the universe. That’s why a team of astronomers from New Zealand conducted a series of spectroscopic observations to peek into the galaxy cluster Abell 3888, unveiling that this cluster is dynamically young and might be an indicator of an ongoing or past merger event. A paper detailing the findings was published online on Feb. 11 on the arXiv pre-print server. In galaxy clustering, mass may not be the only thing that matters Citation: A peek into the merging galaxy cluster Abell 3888 (2016, February 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-02-peek-merging-galaxy-cluster-abell.html Explore further © 2016 Phys.org More information: An Optical Analysis of the Merging Cluster Abell 3888, arXiv:1602.03756 [astro-ph.CO] arxiv.org/abs/1602.03756AbstractIn this paper we present new AAOmega spectroscopy of 254 galaxies within a 30′ radius around Abell 3888. We combine these data with the existing redshifts measured in a one degree radius around the cluster and performed a substructure analysis. We confirm 71 member galaxies within the core of A3888 and determine a new average redshift and velocity dispersion for the cluster of 0.1535 +- 0.0009 and 1181 +- 197 km/s, respectively. The cluster is elongated along an East-West axis and we find the core is bimodal along this axis with two sub-groups of 26 and 41 members detected. Our results suggest that A3888 is a merging system putting to rest the previous conjecture about the morphological status of the cluster derived from X-ray observations. In addition to the results on A3888 we also present six newly detected galaxy over-densities in the field, three of which we classify as new galaxy clusters. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The team, led by Associate Professor Melanie Johnston-Hollitt of the Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, has used the AAOmega spectrograph installed on the 3.9-meter Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) situated at the Siding Spring Observatory in Australia. Thanks to the spectrograph’s 400 fibres covering a two-degree field when projected on sky, it is an excellent instrument for examining the optical substructure in nearby southern clusters.The researchers carried out their observations in May 2013. They were initially targeting nearly 800 galaxies up to 30′ radius from the centre of the cluster. In result, the team detected 254 new redshifts in this region and in combination with previous findings, they determined that Abell 3888, as the main structure, has 71 member galaxies. Importantly, the astronomers were able to identify substructures in the field that were very helpful in unraveling the merging nature of this galaxy cluster.”The combination of pieces of evidence from the optical analysis, the elongated optical galaxy distribution, and our substructure test which showed that Abell 3888 is bimodal strongly suggests that this cluster has had dynamical interactions and is highly likely to be a young cluster in an active merging state,” the paper reads.Galaxies and galaxy groups come together and merge to form larger units such as galaxy clusters. Cluster merging is believed to be a key parameter in formation and evolution of galaxy clusters. The process is very common and has a significant impact on cluster characteristics such as velocity dispersion, temperature and mass. It often generates clumps of galaxies within the cluster volume. This change in galaxy volumetric density is known as “substructure.””Substructures may be formed through the infall of individual galaxies or galaxy groups into a relaxed cluster or during the merging of two or more entire galaxy clusters,” the researchers wrote in the paper.Currently, the most robust method to detect merging is the combination of the optical and X-ray substructure analyses of clusters. Therefore, Shakouri and her colleagues underline that results from spectroscopic observations of Abell 3888 are consistent with previous findings from the X-ray studies focused on unveiling morphology of galaxy clusters.In addition, the team also detected six galaxy over-densities in the field. Three of them were classified as new galaxy clusters.The researchers concluded that further spectroscopic analysis of Abell 3888 would be useful to further probe its dynamics. They also stressed the need for single slit spectroscopy or more usefully observations with an integral field unit are required to increase the spectroscopic coverage in the cluster core. “This would allow a more detailed probe of the cluster core and better statistics on the merging populations,” the scientists noted. 10 arcmin x 10 arcmin field showing luminosity (top) and temperature (bottom) maps of Abell 3888 before (left) and after (right) point source removal. The color scale in the luminosity map is set so that white corresponds to the maximum cluster flux. The point source is 100 times brighter than this level. The scale in the temperature map ranges from 2 to 10 keV. Credit: Andersson, K. et al., 2009.last_img read more

Grand finale

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first_imgThe fifth edition of the Delhi Classical Music Festival came to an end today with a performance by the iconic Pandit Jasraj and a soulful rendition of the traditional Sarod baaj by Pt. Narender Nath Dhar.The performances by Padma Vibhushan Pt Jasraj, and by Pt. Narender Nath Dhar of the Etawah Gharana brought down curtains over the event after five mesmerizing days of classical music display.Showcasing the best of India’s music traditions, the five-day festival of classical music saw several leading names in the field come together with some promising young exponent of classical music. From eminent Dhrupad singers Gundecha brothers; to the doyen of music Ustad Abdul Rashid Khan, to Sitar maestro Ustad Shahid Parvez, the festival witnessed some memorable performances. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Presented by the Department of Art, Culture & Languages, and organized by the Punjabi Academy, the Delhi Classical Music Festival offered an enriching experience to the connoisseurs of art in Delhi in furtherance of the efforts of the Government of Delhi to present and nurture our rich cultural heritage by presenting the finest and best that India has to offer to Delhi’s national and international audience.’We are very happy by the response the people have showed to the festival. At a time, when some people are concerned about modern pop culture overshadowing the Indian classical, we have numerous examples of young Indians who have taken to different genres of Indian classical music and enriched it with their contributions. It is important for us to celebrate India’s classical musical forms and take them to the younger generations. This will not only keep our art forms alive but also encourage the younger generation to absorb and adopt these traditions, said SS Yadav, Secretary, Department of Art, Culture & Languages, Delhi Government.Over five days other vocalists and instrumentalists who performed at Kamani auditorium include Pt. Ulhas Kashalkar; Pt. Ajay Pohankar; Ustad Rashid Khan; Shri Bhuvanesh Komkali; Annupriya Deotale on the Violin; and Prem Kumar and P Vetri Boopathy on the Mridangam.last_img read more

City hosts Dignity March to end victim shaming

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first_imgKolkata: In a collective bid to achieve 100 percent conviction rate in cases of sexual violence, Dignity March, a platform for the survivors of rape and sexual violence, conducted a campaign in Kolkata on Friday.Around thousands take part in this journey — aiming to cover 10,000 km across the country — with the aim to put an end to the culture of shame and fear among victims and instill the fear of conviction in culprits. “We need to support the victims of sexual crimes, especially in cases of commercial sexual exploitation of children, as minors are vulnerable and need constant support from their families and society. In the past, our governments and laws have taken a reactive approach towards this issue but it is high time to take a robust proactive measure to create deterrence among “customers” who buy sex involving children. Also Read – 3 injured, flight, train services hit as rains lash BengalA 100 percent conviction rate is the only solution that can help us instill fear in culprits and put an end to this menace,” said Ashif Shaikh, Convenor, Rashtriya Garima Abhiyan, Dignity March, at an event in Kolkata. The statistics of National Crime Record Bureau 2016 states that out of 15,379 victims trafficked in India, around 58.7 percent is children. Most of these children are trafficked for sex-work (or Commercial Sexual Exploitation). Dignity March is rooted in a national online survey conducted by Rashtriya Garima Abhiyan. The survey ‘Speak Out!’ was conducted to determine the intensity of sexual violence against women and children and gave the survivors an opportunity to raise their voice against such atrocities. The survey revealed that an alarming number of people have faced sexual violence but about 95 percent of such cases remain unreported. Especially, in case of children, most crimes go unnoticed and there is negligible conviction which leads to impunity among culprits. Dignity March has already covered Maharashtra, Goa, Karnataka, Kerala, Pondicherry, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Odisha.last_img read more