Tag Archives: 上海会所工作室

Limerick man dies in overnight crash

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first_img Andrew [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up A 25-year-old Limerick man has died following a single car accident overnight.The single-car crash, where the male died following a collision with a pole, happened at Ballyphillip in Banogue.The crash happened shortly before midnight and the man’s remains were taken to the University Hospital Limerick after he was pronounced dead. A post mortem will take place later today.The road is currently closed while a forensic examination is carried out.Local diversions are in place for a period today.Newcastle West Garda Station is conducting the investigation and are appealing for witnesses. Print Previous article29th Milford Hospice Harvest Fair to draw thousandsNext articleFilm Limerick’s €15,000 bursary Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie NewsBreaking newsLimerick man dies in overnight crashBy Staff Reporter – August 18, 2014 657 Email WhatsAppcenter_img Linkedin Facebook Twitter Advertisementlast_img read more

HAMRICK TOWING EXPANDING AND HAS SEVERAL JOB OPENINGS

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first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare HAMRICK TOWING EXPANDING AND HAS SEVERAL JOB OPENINGSHamrick Towing is expanding and has immediate openings for several positions.According to the firms President John Hamrick said “there are several full-time positions that he needs to fill right away.Mr. Hamrick also stated that these positions offer paid vacations and holidays. Performance bonuses are offered to those who excel in the workplace.  Also, the hourly pay is very competitive. An Equal Opportunity employer.The Following List Of Full-Time Positions Are Posted Below:1) Five (5) Tow Truck drivers2) Paint and Bodyman3) Welder4) Dispatcher5) Diesel MechanicFinally, Mr. Hamrick said; “that the workplace environment is employee-friendly with a downhome attitude.”Interested applicants need to immediately apply in person at Hamrick Towing located at 1277 Maxwell Avenue from thee hours 10;00 to noon Monday through Friday. No phone calls, please.last_img read more

‘Our students are carrying weight that is more than books into classrooms’: End Hate at ND panelists discuss University life

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first_imgA group of students, administrators and faculty gathered for “Identity and Belonging: Highlighting Diverse Voices in the Classroom and Dorm,” a panel discussion about diversity and inclusion Notre Dame on Thursday evening in Bond Hall. Sponsored by End Hate at ND, the Film, Television and Theater Department and the Gender Studies Program, the panel featured speakers who reflected on how Notre Dame could be a more inclusive environment for underrepresented students. Tom Naatz “Identity and Belonging: Highlighting Diverse Voices in the Classroom and Dorm” addressed inclusivity on campus, and featured the experiences of senior Savanna Morgan, an End Hate at ND organizer.Senior Savanna Morgan — one of the principal organizers of the End Hate at ND movement — began by speaking about her positive experiences at Notre Dame.“I’ve had some incredible experiences here as a student at Notre Dame,” Morgan said. “I’m studying something I love — theater and the art of playwriting and performance — and I’ve been afforded opportunities to participate in half a dozen theatrical productions, travel to half a dozen countries, sing the music I love with Notre Dame Jazz Band and for years I’ve conducted research on performance pedagogy with the support of several faculty across departments. I’ve met amazing people here and I’ve grown intellectually and spiritually in ways I couldn’t even have imagined growing up.”Nevertheless, Morgan said the positives only comprise a small part of her experience at the University.“While these accomplishments have been essential to my professional and intellectual growth, accomplishments have only made up a small piece of the pie that is my Notre Dame experience,” she said.Morgan then described three instances of overt racism she has experienced during her time as a student. Once during her freshman year, a group of students in her dorm harassed her about her hair and addressed her in a disrespectful way. In a sophomore philosophy class, she said a white student argued that America’s wealth excused the enslavement of African Americans, as well as the “genocide” committed against Native Americans; the professor did not challenge these remarks. Finally, she discussed being the victim of hate speech in Stanford and Keenan Halls last November — the incidents which incited the creation of End Hate at ND.Morgan condemned the systematic racism she said exists at Notre Dame.“We fail to address the preferential treatment of white people and white things,” she said. “Every type of thing at this school is extremely white, even our curriculum. Black and brown voices are not equally prioritized in the classroom or the dorm, so how can we expect student and faculty to value our contributions as human beings? As equals? … Not enough has been done to promote cultural consciousness and awareness of the dynamics at play in regards to power in the world and on campus.”Hugh Page, vice president and associate provost for undergraduate affairs, acknowledged that, though some progress has been made, Notre Dame has work to do in addressing issues of inclusion.“The root problem I would identify is how to enhance belonging on campus in ways that honor the identities and embody the experiences of faculty, staff and students, and empower them to be change agents and move towards becoming a more fully engaged community of what I would call compassionate intellectuals,” he said.While he mentioned some recent steps to alleviate the issue — including new administration posts related to diversity and inclusion, more affinity groups and college and school specific diversity plans — he lamented the lack of diversity at the school.“Some of our undergraduates are likely to receive degrees without ever having been taught or mentored by a faculty-person of color. Some will leave without having encountered or heard the works of some women and scholars of color,” Page said. “Many may well leave Notre Dame without having had opportunities to think about how colonialism, the Trans-Atlantic slave trade and race have shaped American history and have impacted privilege, heritable wealth, the wellbeing of people of color and even access to education at elite colleges and universities like this one.”Justin McDevitt, the rector of Stanford Hall, spoke about his college years at the University of Houston. McDevitt said his school was one of the most diverse in the country, so the whiteness of Notre Dame was apparent to him.“I remember one football Saturday last year, I was walking across campus taking in the sights, the sounds and the excitement of game day. The bagpipes, the green shamrocks painted on faces, the Celtic font on shirts and flags and buildings — the sheer Irishness of that experience,” he said. “For the first time, I admit, I wondered how Notre Dame got so universally culturally white. This was only reinforced when I turned the corner between O’Shag and Fitz and heard gospel music coming from a tent right in front of DeBart. About seven or eight African American students were selling burgers to raise money for their student group … in a sea of people at Notre Dame on a game day — and in plain sight of the stadium — not a single person was at their tent buying food.”McDevitt said Stanford is committed to improvement after the hate speech incident and has introduced several measures to increase cultural sensitivity in the wake of that incident.“After the protest, dozens of my guys came to me and said, ‘J-Mac, this isn’t us. We’re not like this. We’re better than this,’” McDevitt said. “To which I would always reply: ‘We may not have done a lot of harm in the past, but we also haven’t done a lot of good either. And it’s time to change that.’”Director of the Gender Studies Program Mary Kearney said the school needs to work on creating more hospitable classroom environments to make underrepresented groups feel more comfortable. She called for adding diverse voices to syllabi and described how the gender studies program makes students feel welcome.“We encourage students to always connect what they are learning to their own experiences, their relationships with other people and the social institutions they interact with and move through,” she said. “We make space in our classroom discussions and course assignments for that kind of productive, critical reflection. Much more of that is needed at Notre Dame.”Director for academic diversity and inclusion Pamela Nolan Young called attention to the lack of diversity among Notre Dame faculty — particularly on the tenure track. While she noted there are several different types of faculty on campus, she said the lack of diversity in this group is troubling. She also noted that while the school offers cultural consciousness training for teachers, such workshops are optional.“Our current tenure track faculty population is 908 … of that number, only 84 have identified as being two or more races, African American or Latinx. We have 104 Asian-American faculty; 247 of our faculty are female,” she said. “So we have a long way to go in diversifying our faculty.”Arnel Bulaoro, the interim director of multicultural student programs and services, said his group has made progress in mentoring students from underrepresented groups as they perform undergraduate research. He stressed the importance of representation in education.“For well over a decade, identity and belonging have been the words that have anchored my work at Notre Dame … These [words] over the years have taught me that we have to pay attention to … who’s in the room, and who’s not in the room,” he said.Finally, Lyons Hall rector Kayla August described ways she thought dorm life could be made more inclusive. She offered several critiques of Welcome Weekend, noting that from the very first moment students arrive on campus they are exposed the school’s whiteness. As an example, she cited the songs dorms choose to use as their serenades.August — who is African American — said the school’s lack of diversity is immediately visible to incoming freshmen.“I have one-on-ones with all of my incoming freshmen,” she said. “I talk to them about how life is going at Notre Dame. One of my African American freshmen, the first time I had actually sat down with her, said, ‘I just feel like God put me in this hall. … I got a black RA and a black rector. You guys must’ve beat the system.’ It took her only two weeks to think that there was a system, and that someone beat it, and that she too needed to be invited into that community. I think that says something about what our students experience here.”Speaking about how overwhelming Notre Dame can be for students from underrepresented groups, August said the same student later told her she was just trying to survive her time at Notre Dame.“Our students are carrying weight that is more than books into the classrooms and into the halls. We need to help them,” August said. “It effects how they perform in the classroom, it effects how they get through campus. The same student … when I ask her how it’s going, she says, ‘I just got to get to senior year.’ She hasn’t even been here a whole year yet, and that’s the only thing I’ve ever heard from her when she walks into my hall.”Tags: belonging, end hate at ND, gender studies program, identity, race, Racismlast_img read more

Industrial: Tough times ahead

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first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Men’s soccer battles to 1-1 extra time draw

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first_imgAfter conceding a goal in the first 48 seconds to Loyola-Chicago, the University of Wisconsin men’s soccer team rallied to tie the game, but neither team could find the second goal and the game ended in a 1-1 draw.Loyola started the game with the ball and pushed the ball forward immediately, not allowing the Badgers (2-8-2, 0-4 Big Ten) to get a touch until the ball was already in their own box.Wisconsin tried clearing the ball, but it was deflected, stayed in the box and shot into the back of the net by Loyola senior midfielder Ben Crognale, just 48 seconds into the game to give the Ramblers an early 1-0 lead.Looking for just their third victory this season, Wisconsin head coach John Trask was not pleased with the early goal allowed to Loyola.“You can’t play catch-up, especially as a young team,” Trask said.  “Hopefully the lesson has been learned.”The response to the goal was impressive, as Wisconsin did not let the goal hurt their morale, despite being in an early deficit.“We didn’t change much offensively,” senior captain Jacob Brindle said. “It was bad on us to give up a goal that easy,” Brindle said. “We just stuck to our game plan and did what we needed to do.”It took 17 minutes later, for Wisconsin to tie the game. The equalizing goal came in the 18th minute after Wisconsin freshman midfielder Mike Catalano flicked a ball from the end line that got past the Loyola keeper. Two Loyola defenders were on the ground in front of the goal with the ball, nearly preventing a goal, but UW’s Tom Barlow was able to get a foot on the ball to put it into the back of the net to tie the game at one.The Badgers were able to fight back offensively in the first half, tallying five total shots. Wisconsin was also able to maintain possession on the Ramblers’ goalkeeper Andrew Chekadanov, who had three saves in the opening half.“One thing we keep preaching to these guys is that unless a goal happens in the 89th minute, soccer is a long game, there is a lot of moments to get back in games,” Trask said. “Maybe it registered that we had plenty of time this time to get [the goal] back.“We started playing better, right away in the game. But rather than just, everybody losing their position and not being disciplined, I thought we found our goal out of being disciplined, which I thought was good to see.”The game would remain tied for the remainder of the first half.Throughout the second half, the Badgers were not able to generate much offense, for the total of two shots, with only one of those being on goal, but Loyola could not find a game-winning goal either so the two teams went to the first extra period tied at one.In the extra period, Wisconsin picked up the pace, attacking Loyola for the entirety of the time.Freshman Mark Segbers sprinted past the Loyola defense, almost into the corner of the 18-yard box, before getting pulled down from behind, drawing a yellow card on the Ramblers.The free kick from 20 yards out made it through the crowd of players in the box, and Wisconsin scored the goal, but not before the assistant referee called the Badgers offside.“To start winning games in overtime instead of tying them or losing them is a big jump in these guys’ development,” Trask said. “I thought they had it tonight.”Freshman Adrian Remeniuk took post at goal, and he rewarded the Badgers with four saves on the night — one below his career high.Also getting into the game was freshman Tyler Yanisch who played in just his second game of the season, coming in for midfielder Luc Kazmierczak in the first half for seven minutes, and then again in the second half for Brian Hail.“He has not played much midfield, but we’re looking for some added depth wide in the midfield,” Trask said. “I thought he did well on his first stint in the first half.”The Badgers’ offense has now scored a goal in each of their past four games. Junior midfielder Drew Connor says Wisconsin is getting better at passes and crosses to give their forwards more opportunities.“Just staying patient when we get in the final third [of the field],” Connor said. “Just really trying to find that last pass. We’re doing a good job of working it up the field and getting it out wide, but we have had trouble finding that assist.”The Badgers won the corner kick battle as well Wednesday, with a 4-3 advantage over the Ramblers, including two in the second half and another in the second overtime period.With goals coming on a more consistent basis, the Badgers offense seems to be running smoothly, as they move back into conference play.Wisconsin’s next game is Saturday at 7 p.m. against Ohio State at the McClimon Complex.last_img read more