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Holly Bowling Explains Her Solo Piano Rendition Of Phish’s “Frankie Says” For ‘Music Nerdery, Vol. 5’ [Watch]

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first_imgIn 2018, renowned pianist Holly Bowling has been focused on Ghost Light, her new project with Tom Hamilton, Raina Mullen, Scotty Zwang, and Steve Lyons. With the band’s summer tour primarily wrapped up, save for an upcoming appearance at LOCKN’ Festival next weekend, Bowling has had increasingly more time to devote to her solo endeavors.EXCLUSIVE: Tom Hamilton & Holly Bowling Talk New Band, Ghost Light, & The Grateful DeadYesterday, Bowling released the fifth installment in her Music Nerdery video series, which finds the pianist diving deep into the music theory that underlies her fan-favorite solo piano translations of iconic Phish and Grateful Dead tunes. For this new episode, Bowling explains her take on Phish’s “Frankie Says”, describing how she mimics all the complex layers of the tune on solo piano. Noting that the song is “super fun, because it has a bunch of different layers and parts we get to put together,” Bowling walks viewers through her interpretation of the song, while also offering helpful, and frequently silly, tips and commentary.Holly Bowling – Music Nerdery Vol. 5 – “Frankie Says” [Video: Holly Bowling]Following Ghost Light’s upcoming appearance at LOCKN’ Festival, Holly Bowling will embark on a brief solo tour, kicking off ahead of Phish’s annual mecca to Colorado’s Dick’s Sporting Goods Park with a show at Denver’s Bluebird Theater on August 30th. Following the Labor Day weekend run, Bowling heads to the South, with stops in Charleston, South Carolina; Atlanta, Georgia; Charlotte, North Carolina; and Asheville, North Carolina, ahead of a stop at Washington, DC’s Hamilton on September 9th.Moving northward, Bowling will continue onto to Asbury Park, New Jersey; Fairfield, Connecticut; New York, New York; Ardmore, Pennsylvania; Boston, Massachusetts; and Cohoes, New York, from September 11th through 16th. As for the West Coast, Bowling will make stops across Washington and Oregon ahead of a stop at the iconic Terrapin Crossroads in San Rafael, California, on September 23rd, before reconvening with Ghost Light in Omaha on September 26th. For more information and ticketing, head here.[H/T JamBase]last_img read more

San Francisco’s Bicycle Day Announces 2019 Lineup & Event Details

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first_imgBicycle Day is the annual celebration of Swiss scientist Albert Hoffman’s first intentional ingestion of the chemical compound, LSD-25, after accidentally discovering the compound’s psychedelic nature three days earlier. Named for Hoffman’s trippy bicycle ride home from the lab that fateful day, each year on April 19th, folks come together to celebrate the world’s first acid trip back in 1943.Today, the celebration of unofficial holiday amongst psychonauts worldwide announced the artist lineup for their 2019 event. This year’s Bicycle Day celebration will feature performances by The Polish Ambassador (live), Slow Magic, Rob Garza (Thievery Corporation), Bluetech, Wyatt Marshall (Dirtybird/Desert Hearts), MiHKAL, El Papachango, Dissølv, Evan Casey (Desert Hearts), and Justin Campbell (Desert Hearts). In addition, the event will be illuminated with live visuals courtesy of Android Jones.In addition, Bicycle Day 2019 will feature a blotter print museum curated by Mark McCloud and the Institute of Illegal Images, an art gallery courtesy of Tribe13 Gallery and Android Jones, floral design by Anthony Flowers Ward, psychedelic relics from Shakedown Gallery, live painting, local vendors, interactive installations, organic food, and much more.This year, Bicycle Day will be celebrating its 76th anniversary, presented by Euphonic Conceptions and Legion of Bloom Music. The event will return to its home at The Midway in San Francisco, the larger venue to which the event moved in 2017.The event pages notes, “San Francisco’s Bicycle Day Celebration is not only a concert, but a petri dish of creativity, inspiration, and sensory stimulation. World-renowned visionary artists live painting, an immersive art gallery and exhilarating performances play a large role in this annual festivity that is always packed to the brim with heart-opening experiences.”Tickets for San Francisco’s Bicycle Day celebration at The Midway are on sale now.last_img read more

A thanks-giving meal

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For most Harvard College students, picking up a book at the library is as routine as getting dressed in the morning or grabbing a cup of coffee.In Durban, South Africa, where Mfundo Radebe ’20 grew up, it was a potentially deadly undertaking.Radebe, a Quincy House resident with concentrations in African Studies and Economics, addressed a crowd of nearly 400 on Friday evening at the annual Celebration of Scholarships dinner, which every year brings together students who benefit from financial aid and donors who support it.Describing an upbringing “forged by an oppressive apartheid regime that believed people like me did not deserve an education” Radebe, a recipient of an Edwin H. Fox ’44 Undergraduate Scholarship, recalled being confronted by thieves after one trip to the library, an hour’s walk from his home.,“I found myself standing still on the treacherous path,” he said. “I surveyed the peripheries wondering how I could escape or tame the knife ahead of me, pointed at me. In that moment, I offered my shoes, hoping that would pacify them and allow me safe passageway.”Radebe lost his shoes, but kept hold of “The Chronicles of Narnia.” It was the beginning of a journey of learning that eventually brought him across the globe to Harvard.Once in Cambridge, in his freshman year Radebe started an organization that provides books for primary school children in South Africa. He hopes it will give others the same sense of possibility he has.“If I can just reach one child with a book and they hold onto that book more than anything else, more than the loss they might have experienced, more than the lack of opportunity they have been afforded, I would have succeeded,” Radebe said.This year’s dinner, the 12th scholarship celebration, was held in the Northwest Science Building and co-hosted by Tim Barakett ’87, M.B.A. ’93, and Michele Barakett; Lloyd C. Blankfein ’75, J.D. ’78, and Laura Blankfein P ’16, ’10, ’08; Ken Griffin ’89; and Jerry Jordan ’61, M.B.A. ’67, and Darlene Jordan.,One of four co-chairs for financial aid, Tim Barakett detailed the success of the campaign, and the generosity of donors.“As of this week, we have reached our campaign goal of $600 million,” he said. “To give you an idea of how generous this community is, just six months ago we were short of our goal. We made an appeal, you responded, and we still have until June 30 to continue to build on our success. I am so grateful for the generosity of everyone in this room.”Co-chair Jerry Jordan said he has seen the event he helped inaugurate in 2007 come full circle.“Today, we are already seeing graduates from that year among our donors and here with us tonight,” he said. “This event represents a truly virtuous cycle.”Kicking off the student portion of the program, recent graduate Shuya Gong spoke about discovering entrepreneurship at Harvard and reflected on her brief experience as a recent graduate.,“My life had been pretty normal when I arrived at Harvard, but I didn’t really know what was next,” she said. “Mechanical engineering exposed me to the concept of creating something out of nothing. That really inspired me and really invigorated me to get up every morning and go to the lab.”She credited her professors with building on the concept of creation to encourage her to pursue entrepreneurship.“Harvard put a lot of pressure on me to grow as a person, to learn things I didn’t know previously, and to step outside my comfort zone,” Gong said. “But it never put pressure on me or my family financially, and because of that I had room to grow and thrive.”Senior Zarin Rahman, a native of South Dakota, receives aid through the Radford D. Lovett Family Scholarship Fund and plans to apply to medical school to become a pediatrician. She thanked the many donors in the room who helped make her education possible.“My love for children and my motivation to work with them has been one of the few constants in my life,” said the Mather House resident, who concentrated in neurobiology. “There is so much to learn from them: creativity, curiosity, positivity, kindness, and the purest forms of joy.“Beyond being affordable for both me and my family, Harvard has opened doors to explore my interests more than I could have imagined in my wildest dreams,” she said. “I look forward to taking these experiences and the knowledge Harvard has armed me with and trying to make the world a better place.”Cape Cod native Matthew Cappucci ’19 has always been interested in weather. So when he found there was no concentration in atmospheric sciences at Harvard, he decided to create one.,“I’m a department of one pursuing my very own special concentration,” he said. “It took months, a 30-page application, six recommendation letters, and more signatures than it would were I to run for president, but I finally got approval to pursue the first-ever atmospheric sciences concentration at Harvard.“Being a department of one has its challenges,” said Cappucci, who received a Gerald Jordan Family Scholarship. “I anticipated the path to be a lonely one. I could not have been more wrong. Harvard has given me everything and I will never be able to repay them for the incredible doors they’ve opened and the gifts they’ve given me. Thank you all for what you have done, and the support you continue to give.”The evening also featured comments from Edgerley Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Michael D. Smith and Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid William R. Fitzsimmons, both of whom extolled the financial aid program as among Harvard’s most important.“I am incredibly grateful to everyone here tonight for the powerful legacy of opportunity that you have helped to build here at Harvard,” Smith said. “As tonight so wonderfully demonstrates, financial aid empowers the next generation. Financial aid frees our students to follow their passions, and it accelerates the development of tomorrow’s leaders.”“Tonight is one of the greatest nights of my life,” Fitzsimmons said. “I believe in equality of opportunity, and if we are any kind of world or society, we need to guarantee equality of opportunity for every generation. This mission and this event defines who we are.”Ken Griffin, who in 2014 made the largest gift to financial aid in College history, agreed that providing opportunity for all is a core value.“People often ask me why I am so committed to financial aid,” he said. “Financial aid speaks to a principle that all of us hold dear as Americans. You cannot be the greatest institution in America if you do not represent the belief in equality of opportunity in your actions.”“The Harvard that we know today was made by financial aid,” said Lloyd Blankfein. “And the gratitude flows in both directions: [to and from] the donors who help worthy students realize their potential, and the worthy students [who allow] Harvard to realize its potential.” read more

Carroll’s chance of a lifetime

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first_imgBEN WORGULL/Herald photoSince 1998, the Kohl Center has been a house of horrors for visiting college basketball teams. In eight seasons in the 17,000-seat arena, 108 opponents have visited and only 17 have walked away successful. Under Bo Ryan, the Badgers’ record at home is even better, with the University of Wisconsin going 72-5 against the competition, including exhibition games. Needless to say, the Kohl Center is one the most ominous places to play in the Big Ten, if not the whole country. So when tiny Division-III Carroll College came to Madison, fans were expecting a similar result. But fans didn’t know that Carroll College head coach David Schultz, who turned the Pioneer program from a two-win doormat to a 20-plus-win NCAA tournament team, is well-respected for being able to find opponent’s tendencies and getting the most out of his players. In Schultz’s 400-plus games on the bench, however, he’s never had to prepare his team to play in a venue quite like the Kohl Center. 2:45–3:00Carroll’s charter bus arrives in the Kohl Center’s loading dock with coaches and players quickly getting to work. While the athletes get comfortable in their new locker room, the coaching staff gets a quick rundown from a Kohl Center manager on the pre-game introductions, where the Badgers stand for the national anthem and the media timeouts in place during the game. When asked if there’s anything else they need, Schultz is quick on the draw with a witty response.”Do you have any 7-footers we can borrow?” Schultz joked. “That’s all we asked for before we came.”3:00–4:00Carroll’s 18 players take the floor for a light one-hour workout to get used to their surroundings. Playing in small, high school gyms in Division III, the vast arena causes some wide-eyes among the young team. Schultz tries to keep the first half of the practice light, playing perimeter-shooting games with the squad, forcing the losers to do some easy conditioning. The last 20 minutes of Carroll’s practice is spent on the Badgers and five set plays Wisconsin likes to run. Since this will be Carroll’s first exhibition game of the season, Schultz wants to keep the defense’s mentality simple: Force Wisconsin into the middle of the floor, extend the defense to the free throw line and locate an offensive player before locating the ball.”Maintain your [defensive] triangles so you can come in and help your teammates but be able to kick out and contest the [perimeter] shot,” assistant coach Krayton Nash instructs. After practice, Schultz gives his team the message he will preach the entire evening.”Go out and play your game and whatever happens, happens,” Schultz said. “Most importantly, enjoy this moment and have fun out there.”4:00–5:30While the women’s basketball team takes the court for their practice, Carroll’s players get time to relax. Some choose to stay and watch the women’s team practice, while others make for the food tent to enjoy a lunch of subs, chips and Gatorade. However, not all the Carroll staff gets to enjoy the free time.One of the many miscellaneous things Schultz has to do is take ticket requests to the basketball offices, located on the second floor of the Kohl Center. Every visiting team gets 30 complementary tickets and the ability to purchase 70 more. Being only an hour east of Madison, Carroll has used up all their ticket requests, as people seem to come out of hiding quickly to ask Schultz for tickets or directions.”Everybody and their Uncle Charlie is calling the week before to get tickets,” Schultz jokes. “We can only help so many, and the rest are on their own.”6:10–6:35The coaches and players huddle into the tiny locker room with Schultz positioning himself at the board. After going over Wisconsin’s lineup, Schultz moves into his seven defensive points and seven offensive points: emphasizing communications, contesting shots, running the floor and valuing the basketball.”Make them play, [and] make them earn it,” Schultz said. “There are 10 guys and one ball.”Then Schultz, like a crafty general, reveals his plan to his troops: break the game into four-minute segments. Because Carroll isn’t used to having two-minute media timeouts, Schultz doesn’t want his players to pace themselves on the court, since they get extra time to recoup on the bench. “Win those first four minutes,” Schultz instructs. “Don’t play tired or to pace yourself, play hard for the first four minutes, and then we’ll go from there. Let’s see how many of those four-minutes blocks we can win.”After a team prayer and huddle, the players hit the floor running. Meanwhile, Schultz hits the coaches’ locker room for a pre-game shower and goes over final notes.6:40–7:05Schultz is ready, the players are ready and pre-game introductions begin. Before going out on the court, Schultz tries to calm the players and downplay the situation.”Take a deep breath, enjoy the moment and focus in on the moment when you’re out there and worry about the game you’ve been playing since you started playing,” Schultz said. “[If you can do that], we can live with the results.”First halfOn the fourth possession of the game, Carroll scores the first points of the contest.”Should we call a timeout and have someone take a picture of the scoreboard?” Schultz jokes, drawing a laugh from his assistant coaches. Little did Schultz know, his four-minute plan would continue working, as the smaller lineup pestered the Badgers. At the first media timeout, Carroll had forced Wisconsin to take six outside shots and closed down the paint. “You won that first four minutes, now go out there and win the next one,” Schultz urges.Carroll uses their quicker speed, perimeter shooting and stout defense to overwhelm Wisconsin, going on an 11-2 run over the next four minutes to lead 19-10 and quiet the Kohl Center, something few teams have been able to do.”Keep bringing the intensity,” Schultz encourages during the next media timeout. “Forget about the score. Just play ball and win the next four minutes.”Unfortunately for Schultz, Carroll begins to struggle down the first-half stretch. In their last 10 possessions, Carroll only manages three points, missing eight shots and committing four turnovers. Even so, the Pioneers go into the locker room only trailing by six, thanks to 13 points from Buck Colomy, making Bo Ryan take notice of their scrappy defense.”Defensively, they really worked hard on not giving up the easy looks,” Ryan said. “Didn’t help that they shot well over 50 percent in the first seven or eight minutes.”HalftimeSchultz and his coaching staff are bittersweet as they talk in the hallway outside the locker room. On the positive, Carroll allowed only 10 points in the paint, shut down Wisconsin’s big men and limited All-Big Ten forward Alando Tucker to just two points.What’s disappointing to the coaches is the Pioneers’ last 10 minutes of the half.”We had 10 turnovers in the last 10 minutes,” Schultz said. “That led to them transitioning and us not getting set [and] committing fouls. Take care of the ball. Some were bad ideas, but obviously, timing wasn’t right.”Regardless, the team felt good about the position they had put themselves in and how they’d forced Wisconsin to play to their style of basketball.”We jumped out to a lead and [Bo Ryan] countered by going small, so that’s fine; we have them playing our game now.” Schultz said. “Take a deep breath, get some shots in and take it.”Second halfThe Badgers jumped out quickly in the second half on Carroll, going on a quick 6-0 run that forced Schultz to call a time out.”Don’t get tight, play ball and play loose,” Schultz told his team.”Just stay focused on what you need to do, guys,” Nash said. “Don’t let them get into their comfort zone.”With just over 11 minutes left, Carroll makes their move, going on an 8-0 run by drawing foul, fighting for offensive rebounds and using their scrappy defense. Carroll was within six and feeling the upset.It was all for naught though, as Wisconsin finally started flexing their muscles, going on a 24-10 run over Carroll, who struggled to find the bottom of the net in the last eight minutes, only managing nine shots during that stretch. With the game well out of reach, Schultz used the last media timeout to encourage his team to soak everything in.”Finish strong guys, and don’t go backwards,” Schultz said. “Enjoy this experience and finish the game strong.”The end result was an 81-61 Wisconsin victory; a final score that didn’t tell the story of the entire game.9:05–9:15A somber locker room is left quiet for a few minutes as the five Carroll coaches huddle outside and write down a couple points. Inside, he keeps his talk brief but direct to the players, as the Pioneers just put a top-ten Division I team through a dogfight.”We had a few lapses, but it’s a good foundation to build on, and we got a sense of what our team is like, what we can do, where we are strong and what we need to continue to work on,” Schultz said to his players.”That’s the [No. 9] team in the country, and you gave them game,” Nash added. “What else can I say? You played hard and gave them a game.”After calling every player into the center of the room and having a team cheer, Schultz and players Buck Colomy and Nathan Drury make their way to the media room to address the media.While walking across the Kohl Center floor, Colomy, who led all scores with 25 points on the night, simply said, “This was a lot of fun.”As Carroll was about to walk into media room, a large eruption was heard from the stands, as two-dozen Carroll supporters stayed to continue to show their support for the school. With a wave of the hand and a shout of thanks, Schultz entered the media room.9:25–9:45After going up to the Kohl Center concourse to meet with some parents, Schultz returns to his locker room and gathers his things before heading to his car. With his luggage bag, briefcase and sport coat in his hands, Schultz takes one quick glance around the locker room and walks toward the bus. Once there, Schultz takes a count to make sure everyone is accounted for and tells the bus driver that they’re ready to go.It’s been a long day of planning and preaching for Schultz — formulating a game plan for success, walking that plan through with his team, reinforcing the plan in the locker room and executing it on the court.While the Carroll College Pioneers may have been just another victim to the winning ways of the Kohl Center, Carroll was able to do what most schools can’t — play toe-to-toe with the Badgers and show that they are legit.last_img read more