Monthly Archives: April 2021

Shire Foods

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first_imgMidlands-based Shire Foods sees major growth areas in savoury pastries and pies. It has recently launched the first of many new hand-held productss under the Pizza Pod brand name.The Pizza Pod is offered frozen unbaked, frozen baked and fresh baked and comes in a hand-held ovenable carrier. It contains 30% Mozzarella cheese, tomatoes, onions, mixed peppers and Italian herbs.last_img

Good year for Carr’s

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first_imgThe successful integration of two mills and strong sales of speciality flours have helped Cumbria-based miller Carr’s notch up healthy sales and profit increases.For the 52 weeks to 2 September 2006, Carr’s Milling Industries announced that its food division increased its operating profit to £3.3m from the previous year’s total of £2.3m. Turnover reached £55.7m, up from £48m in 2005.Carr’s three mills in Cumbria, Fife and Essex operated at near capacity throughout the period. CEO Chris Holmes told British Baker the mills still had some spare capacity, but the company is “always looking for acquisitions if the opportunity is right”.Higher-margin speciality flours are performing particularly well, while the Kirkcaldy and Maldon mills, acquired from Meneba in November 2004, benefited from a full year’s trading and efficiencies implemented since acquisition.Carr’s warned that the coming year would present challenges. Chairman Richard Inglewood said: “The massive increase in wheat prices, combined with high-energy costs, will make it a tough year.”Holmes said Carr’s would introduce a second flour price rise, following one earlier in the year, of £25 per tonne before Christmas.last_img read more

November – April Highlights in the coming months include the CCFRA course on Wheat, Milling and Flour Quality and the Baking Industry Summit on Corporate Social Responsibility

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first_imgNovember17 – 18 November, 2007Bread Matters FundamentalLocation: The Village Bakery, Melmerby, Penrith, CumbriaContact, tel: 01768 881899Andrew Whitley22 Chorleywood Bread ProcessLocation: CCFRAContact, tel: 01386 842104 (The Training Department)24 – 25 Basic BreadmakingLocation: Cann Mills, DorsetContact, tel: 01722 341 447Email: [email protected] – 29 Understanding Wheat, Milling and Flour QualityLocation: CCFRAContact: tel: 01386 842104 (The Training Department)2008January14 – 18 Practical Biscuit TechnologyLocation: CCFRAContact, tel: 01386 842104 (The Training Department)February7 Baking Industry Summit – Corporate Social ResponsibilityLocation: Gray’s Inn, LondonContact, tel: 01293 846587Email: [email protected] – 10 Basic BreadmakingLocation: Cann Mills, DorsetContact, tel: 01722 341 447Email: [email protected] Practical Flour AnalysisLocation: CCFRAContact, tel: 01386 842104 (The Training Department)12-13 Breads from Continental EuropeLocation: CCFRAContact, tel: 01386 842104 (The Training Department)15 One-Day Basic BreadmakingLocation: Cann Mills, DorsetContact, tel: 01722 341 447Email: [email protected] – 17 Continental BreadsLocation: Cann Mills, DorsetContact, tel: 01722 341 447Email: [email protected] – 21 Hostec-Europe 2008Location: ExCeL, London DocklandsContact, tel: 01672 56409918 – 21 Hotelympia 2008Location: ExCeL, London Contact, tel: 01672 56409929 Italian BreadsLocation: Cann Mills, DorsetContact, tel: 01722 341 447Email: [email protected] – 2 Wood-fired Oven WorkshopLocation: Cann Mills, DorsetContact, tel: 01722 341 447Email: [email protected] – 5 French Breads, with SourdoughLocation: Cann Mills, DorsetContact, tel: 01722 341 447Email: [email protected] – 7 Principles of BakingLocation: CCFRAContact, tel: 01386 842104 (The Training Department)14 One-Day Basic Bread CourseLocation: Cann Mills, DorsetContact, tel: 01722 341 447Email: [email protected] – 16 British Traditional BreadsLocation: Cann Mills, DorsetContact, tel: 01722 341 447Email: [email protected] – 19 Technology of Cereals, Milling and BakingLocation: CCFRAContact, tel: 01386 842104 (The Training Department)29 – 31 Going ProfessionalLocation: Cann Mills, DorsetContact, tel: 01722 341 447Email: [email protected] – 02 April Europain 2008Location: Exhibition Centre, Paris Nord VillepinteContact, tel: +33 1 4968 4972Email: [email protected] – 9 Baking Industry ExhibitionLocation: NEC, BirminghamContact, tel: 01293 610 400 Darren Rose-Neale or James PrescottEmail: [email protected] – 13 Basic BreadmakingLocation: Cann Mills, DorsetContact, tel: 01722 341 447Email: [email protected]last_img read more

Lunchtime habits

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first_imgMore than two-thirds of office workers have sandwiches for lunch, according to new research.In a survey, carried out by Ipsos Mori for BaxterStorey, researchers found that 92% of office workers eat lunch, 78% are regular snackers, and of these, 20% snack on crisps while 27% snack on biscuits.”Of those who rarely or never eat lunch, 27% also never eat breakfast during the working week,” said the report. Only 17% eat breakfast every day and the same number eat breakfast between just one and three times in the week.Face-to-face research was conducted from 28 September to 2 November 2007. A nationally representative sample of 1,015 office workers aged 15-plus in the UK were interviewed.last_img read more

ASA sides with Greggs in ad complaint

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first_imgThe Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has ruled in favour of Greggs after receiving a complaint about one of its TV ads. A member of the public complained about Gregg’s Steak Bake ad, querying the statement that the product does not contain hydrogenated fat. In response, Greggs said that the Steak Bake does not contain any hydrogenated fat, and provided declaration forms signed by each of the suppliers of ingredients for the bake to prove it. Clearcast also stated that they were happy to approve the advert as Greggs had provided them with a list of ingredients, showing the bake contained no hydrogenated fat.Greggs also made it clear that the advert was referring specifically to the ingredients in the Steak Bake, and made no claims about any other Greggs products. The ASA said it would not uphold the viewer’s complaint.last_img read more

In my world

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first_imgDavid Powell, Deputy Master of the Worshipful Company of Bakers and global director innovation/bakery, Rich ProductsAnd so to Paris in glorious spring sunshine for Europain. It was eye-wateringly cold, so spare a thought for a delegation from the National Baking Industry Association (NBIA) of Australia who had left temperatures of 28C to fly over.In many ways, their attendance at a French exhibition was odd, as yet again my trip highlighted that although the UK and France are separated by only 20 miles of water and getting closer, with the new St Pancras Eurostar link, in baking terms the gulf is very wide and probably increasing.As an example, on my way to catch the train home I made a small detour via Arnaud Delmontel (www.arnaud-delmontel.com). Apart from being Patisserie of the Year in 2006 and winner of the Best Baguette in Paris, it is also the bakery of choice for President Sarkozy and Carla Bruni’s daily baguette. In Britain, do we know or would we care where Gordon and Sarah buy their bread? And if we did, I suspect most would assume it was based on some commercial or sponsorship deal, rather than taste and quality.My discussion with a couple of the Australian group highlighted that although our two countries are separated by over 10,000 miles, in terms of bakery we are very similar and share many of the same issues: recruitment of good young people; a lack of quality accredited training; a reliance on often transient immigrant labour; constant downward price pressures and so on.The NBIA is working very hard to get some formalised training system in place and seems to be achieving some success, although it struggles with a reluctance from employers to release employees or to contribute financially. Sound familiar?They also mentioned a reluctance to work together to the common good and the vast distances between settlements. Yards from where we were talking, a large part of Hall 1 was dedicated to French baking schools and institutions, all busily selling their courses to enthusiastic youngsters, and the end of the Hall was taken over with numerous identical mini bakeries for the students’ live competitions.One other thought that my meeting highlighted was how fortunate we are in the UK with our proximity to bakery shows. They are, or should be, essential visiting for anyone involved in the trade who wants to catch up on current trends, ideas and innovation. It only takes one idea that ends up in your shop or product range to more than justify the cost of the trip.So I hope to see you at one or more of this year’s shows or even at the Mobec exhibition in Tokyo next year? Yes, I know it’s nearer to Australia, but a visit there and to the bakery shops in Tokyo will transform your thinking!last_img read more

Business Start-ups Ms Cupcake

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first_imgIt seems to be everyone’s dream to set up a small ’bake from home’ cake firm nowadays. That was my plan just one year ago, when I left a career in education and traded in my lesson plans for recipe cards. Little did I know, when I rolled up my sleeves on my 1950s frock, put on my pinny and pearls and got down to the lovely business of baking decadent cakes, that my life would be turned upside-down.Twelve months ago, I opened a stall in London’s Greenwich Market and waited for something to happen. Flash forward and the Ms Cupcake brand is now a team of six staff. This week we flung open the doors to London’s first entirely vegan bakery shop in Brixton, South London.So how did we make the transition from home baker to professionals? Firstly, I redeveloped my kitchen and had the local council approve it. The business needed to be registered and I took courses with HMRC to make sure the books stayed on the straight and narrow. A fabulous website designer came along and I went about attacking social media Facebook, Twitter head-on. Weeks were spent in the British Library, researching the market, and countless hours on perfecting recipes.Most large cities in the US and Canada have at least one vegan retail bakery. So it would seem that London had been crying out for one. I predicted my cakes would be popular with ethical vegans. But I hadn’t realised how many people out there cannot eat animal products due to allergies, food intolerances and for religious reasons.Countless children have walked up to the market stall with their family and been told they can have any cake from us that these special cakes won’t make them ill. The look of unmitigated joy and surprise on that child’s face is the reason why we continue to make cake and spread love.With my home kitchen not able to cope with the volume of cakes we were now producing every week, I needed to figure out our next step and a retail shop seemed the answer. Has it been easy?… not exactly. We have had problems getting water plumbed in, our new ovens arrived completely smashed… need I go on? But what has got us through is the warm welcome from the local community and the constant support from our fans. Who knows what new challenges will be thrown our way but we’ll tackle them with a smile and a fistful of decadent cupcakes.last_img read more

Roads to new horizons

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first_imgAs Bill Clinton said in 1992, “It’s the economy stupid!”You’d have to have buried your head in the sand of late not to realise that things have changed, or are about to take a turn for the worse, on the economic front.From the Euro debate, the Greek bad-debt situation, the jobless figures and now the news on the inflation front – it is hard for both retailers and manufacturers alike to stay positive and keep their ship afloat, sailing in the direction they had planned for.That is why it is good to see in this issue how two of the biggest names in the industry are diverging in a bid to enter new markets. Firstly it was Warburtons, with its shock announcement that it was now selling its products via Tesco in three different European countries. As chairman Jonathan Warburton explains on page 4, the company has more than 135 years of heritage that it can draw on to take into this new market.Initial reports from the Czech Republic, Hungary and Slovakia are good and Warburtons hopes to be able to expand its offering into different regions by 2012.Greggs, too (page 4), is another company in the sector that is stretching itself. Hot on the heels of its announcement of an upmarket Greggs Moment store comes the news that the well-known bakery brand will soon become available on the nation’s highways and byways. The move to open a franchise outlet at a motorway service station in Cheshire is an innovative one and takes Greggs on the road to new customers and markets. A similar move by Waitrose has also paid dividends. And, considering the amount of time we now spend on the roads, why not?However, there is one road in the UK that is suffering and that is the high street. At the recent British Society of Baking conference in Warwickshire, John Waterfield of Waterfield’s, based in Leigh, gave an honest assessment of life in the retail environment(see pages 22 and 23). He criticised a lack of “joined up thinking” when it came to shops on the high street, pointing to planning, the major supermarkets and parking. It is hard not to agree with his assertions.last_img read more

Jane’s Pantry to create flagship shop

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first_imgGloucestershire-based Jane’s Pantry will be transforming one of its bakery shops into a flagship store.The buffet catering and wholesale bakery business, which has several sites across the county, will be extending its Kingswalk, Gloucester premises into a vacant retail outlet next door. The current 27-seater location will be transformed into a larger bakery café and coffee shop, due to be completed by 2017.Neville Morse, managing director at Jane’s Pantry, said: “We want the new flagship to be homely and modern, a place where people can come enjoy the experience at Jane’s Pantry. We are competing with the likes of Costa Coffee, but our focus will be more on the food as opposed to the coffee. You’ve got to put your stamp on it and be a magnet for customers.”For the design of the new store, Jane’s is now in talks with German shop-fitting specia-list Aichinger, which gave a presentation at British Baker’s first BB75 Lunch in London on 29 February.last_img read more

Indiana Michigan Power warning of scam going around

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first_img Pinterest Google+ Twitter Facebook Google+ WhatsApp Indiana Michigan Power warning of scam going around Twitter Previous articleBraun pushing bill to reward farmers for good environmental practicesNext articleOne of the Indiana’s biggest conventions in cancels in-person event 95.3 MNCNews/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel is your breaking news and weather station for northern Indiana and southwestern Michigan. Pinterest (Photo Supplied/State of Massachusetts Government) Indiana Michigan Power is warning Hoosiers of a scam going around.They say scammers are pretending to be employees with I&M, calling customers and claiming they are late paying their electric bill. They’ll then threaten to shut off your power if you don’t call a different number to make a payment, and might even ask for bank account or debit card information.I&M reminds customers that they’ve suspended disconnects to help those who are struggling to make payments during the pandemic, and they would never call a customer and demand an immediate payment.Indiana Michigan Power released the following information about the scam:Scams are not unique to I&M, nor have they gone away with the emergence ofthe COVID-19 pandemic. Scams have been reported across the U.S. targeting various utility customers and companies. Some scam calls have recently been reported to I&M, including calls where scammers are speaking in other languages, like Spanish.The scams often vary, but often work like this:Customers receive calls from scammers falsely identifying themselves as I&M employees.The caller claims the customer is late paying their bill, and their power will be disconnected if the customer does not pay immediately.Many scammers “spoof” the telephone number to appear as a different number. In some cases, it may appear to be an authentic I&M phone number.Customers are usually instructed to call a different number to arrange payment.The scammers may seek account information or personal credit card and banking information from customers. Some direct customers to buy a debit card and provide the debit card number.During the pandemic, I&M has suspended disconnects for non-payment. We remind customers that they are still responsible for their bills and it is important that they continue paying for their usage.For assistance on paying their bill, Indiana customers can contact us at 800-311-4634; Michigan customers should call 800-311-6424. We also encourage customers to follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/indianamichiganpower) and Twitter (@IN_MI_Power) where they can speak directly with customer service specialists on those platforms.Regardless of the situation, I&M employees NEVER call customers demanding immediate payment. Nor does I&M disconnect service without prior written warning.Anyone receiving such calls should hang up and call I&M’s Customer Operations Center at 800-311-4634 to report the scam.As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and the physical distancing recommendations made by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), I&M and our contractors are limiting in-person visits during this process to ensure the public’s and our employee’s safety and health. WhatsApp Facebook By 95.3 MNC – June 28, 2020 0 549 IndianaLocalMichiganNewslast_img read more