Anglican, Episcopal women gather to open the 60th annual UNCSW

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first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY By Lynette WilsonPosted Mar 14, 2016 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal and Anglican women gathered March 14 at the Episcopal Church Center’s Chapel of Christ the Lord for a Eucharist opening the 60th annual United Nations Conference on the Status of Women underway through March 24. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Examples of women’s strength, courage and “sisterhood of the suffering” can be found throughout the Bible, including in the two lectionary readings coinciding with the opening of the 60th annual United Nations Commission on the Status of Women.The March 14 readings, 2 Kings 4:18-37, where Elisha raises the Shunnamite’s son, the Gospel, John 11:18-44, in which Jesus raises Lazarus to life, are each an invitation “to claim the witness and power” of women in biblical texts, said the Rev. Margaret Rose, the Episcopal Church’s deputy for ecumenical and interfaith collaboration, in a sermon given during the opening midday Eucharist at the Chapel of Christ the Lord in the Episcopal Church Center a block from the United Nations headquarters.“Each [story] is about healing and resurrection…,” said Rose. “[But] it is the women who brought these healers where they needed to be. The women who were the messengers, the women who refused to give up when others were paralyzed by mourning, the women who proclaimed the possibility of new life and redemption, and women who named Jesus as Messiah.”In the spirit of the healing of the world, women from across the Episcopal Church and throughout the Anglican Communion representing more than 20 countries are gathered in New York for the 60th session of the UNCSW March 14-­­­­­­­24. The women had gathered in the chapel at the church center that morning to watch the official U.N. webcast opening the conference.Diane Wright, of the Diocese of Virginia, left, Cynthia Katsarelis, of the Diocese of Colorado, and Jennifer Allen, of the Diocese of Kansas, sat together to watch the United Nations Conference on the Status of Women’s opening webcast broadcast live on March 14 from United Nations headquarters. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceIn addition to the official Episcopal and Anglican delegations, each with up to 20 delegates, many more women and men are in New York representing Anglican Women’s Empowerment, Episcopal Church Women, the International Anglican Women’s Network, the Anglican Church of Canada and the Episcopal Diocese of New York attending offsite and parallel events and panels.“What an honor to represent so many women across the world …,” said Presiding Bishop Michael Curry in a letter read on his behalf by the Rev. David Copley, the Episcopal Church’s officer for mission personnel, before the March 14 morning webcast.“Throughout the two weeks, I pray you listen, learn, and work together focusing on the four ongoing challenges to the achievement of women’s empowerment identified in the Episcopal Church’s written statement to the UNCSW…,” he said.Although the Episcopal Church has had a presence at the UNCSW since 2000, only in recent years, since 2014, when it gained consultative status with the U.N. Economic and Social Council has it sent a delegation to official UNCSW proceedings. Moreover, last fall, the church submitted a statement to the UNCSW identifying four ongoing challenges and asking member states “to swiftly adopt and implement legislation on the following urgent needs”: to enable women to access power and decision-making positions; to foster women’s and girls’ economic empowerment and independence; to eradicate violence against women and girls; and to provide preferential treatment to marginalized women and girls.The four ongoing challenges named as advocacy priorities were those mentioned by Curry in his letter. The presiding bishop determined the Episcopal Church’s official advocacy priorities based on General Convention and Executive Council resolutions and the church’s position on issues such as human trafficking and gender-based violence in relation to conversations currently underway at the U.N., explained Lynnaia Main, global relations officer for the Episcopal Church and its liaison to the United Nations.The theme for the 60th annual UNCSW is “Women’s empowerment and its link to sustainable development,” and the review theme carried over from the 57th session is “The elimination and prevention of all forms of violence against women and girls,” which includes a framework for addressing, preventing and responding to violence against women and girls.The session’s theme follows the 2015 endorsement by world leaders of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which includes 17 new Sustainable Development Goals and 169 targets that aim to end poverty, combat inequalities and promote prosperity while protecting the environment. The SDGs build upon the eight Millennium Development Goals adopted in 2000.Specifically, the fifth SDG seeks to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls, with targets including ending discrimination; eliminating violence, including trafficking and sexual exploitation; eliminating harmful practices such as child and forced marriage; and, recognizing the value of unpaid care and domestic work.This year’s UNCSW also comes on the heels of the 21st annual Conference of the Parties, where in December 2015 in Paris  negotiators reached a historic agreement aimed at reducing carbon emissions and holding global warming to below 2 degrees Celsius. And an agreement to generate financing for the sustainable development agenda adopted last summer.Nineteen Episcopal delegates – including one provincial representative to the Anglican Communion delegation – will attend official U.N. proceedings and represent the church’s official positions.Anglican and Episcopal delegates will also participate in Ecumenical Women’s advocacy, including training, ecumenical worship, visiting permanent missions at the United Nations, and continuing advocacy upon return to their local communities.Ecumenical Women is an international coalition of church denominations and ecumenical organizations which have status with the U.N. Economic & Social Council; these bodies share and are committed to a common mission and vision.One of the things the Episcopal Church delegation will be doing is advocating, general networking and sharing Ecumenical Women’s priorities in an attempt to influence the outcome document, said Main. It’s important that churches and non-government and non-profit organizations, or civil society in U.N. parlance, play a role in implementing the sustainability goals and financing women’s organizations, said Main.“It’s really important that we ‘leave no one behind,’ that’s one of the key phrases” of this year’s UNCSW, she said.The UNCSW serves to promote women’s rights in political, economic, civil, social and educational fields, and to make recommendations on urgent problems regarding women’s rights. The conference has convened annually or biannually since 1946; it reached a turning point in Beijing in 1995 when it adopted a global policy framework for gender equality and the empowerment of women that identified 12 areas of critical concern.As Anglican and Episcopal women did in 2007, when the Anglican Communion was reeling from the election of the Rt. Rev. Gene Robinson, as the first openly gay partnered bishop in the Episcopal Church, Anglican and Episcopal women again are coming together in a time of crisis.The Rev. Margaret Rose, the Episcopal Church’s deputy for ecumenical and interfaith collaboration, preached during the opening Eucharist at the Chapel of Christ the Lord located at the Episcopal Church Center a block from the United Nations headquarters. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service“As the women gathered for the 51st UNCSW that year, we did not want those conflicts to blind us to the needs of our sisters and brothers around the world,” said Rose in her sermons, those needs being food, education, freedom from violence, war and rape.At that time, an Anglican Communion statement sent to the United Nations and a similar statement sent the Anglican primates signed by more than 80 women proclaimed: “[This] sisterhood of suffering is at the heart of our theology and our commitment to transforming the whole world through peace and justice. Rebuilding and reconciling the world that is central to our faith.”This time as the Episcopal and Anglican woman come together it is in the wake of the Anglican primates calling for temporary “consequences” against the Episcopal Church in the aftermath of the 78th General Convention’s decision to change canonical language that defines marriage as being between a man and a woman (Resolution A036) and authorize two new marriage rites with language allowing them to be used by same-sex or opposite-sex couples (Resolution A054).It’s expected that the delegates representing the Anglican Communion will draft a statement reinforcing Anglican and Episcopal women’s sisterhood and solidarity to be sent to the Anglican Consultative Council in time for its April 8-19 meeting in Lusaka, Zambia, said Julia Ayala Harris, of the Diocese of Oklahoma and the Episcopal Church’s provincial Anglican Communion delegate.— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Anglican, Episcopal women gather to open the 60th annual UNCSW Theme: ‘Women’s empowerment and its link to sustainable development’ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Sustainable Development Goals, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Dr. Erna Lund says: March 17, 2016 at 11:13 am Dear Dr. Lund,Your heartfelt cry is heard. The American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem is an organization in the US that works directly with the health care and educational institutions of the Diocese of Jerusalem. http://www.afedj.org. I have been involved with this organization for the last 12 years and seen first hand how we support the work to heal and educate through the work from the ground up. These institutions serve whomever comes in need and that is Muslims and Christians and any Jews who would need help. This is a ministry of suffering both from the caregivers and the needy. It is the ministry of our Lord Jesus Christ and we must not let the Christian presence disappear! Please know there are small ways to be there with our Lord. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Phoebe Griswold says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Women’s Ministry center_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC UNCSW, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments (2) Comments are closed. March 16, 2016 at 2:00 pm Does this Sisterhood extend to the Palestinian women–both Christian and Muslim–in Gaza, West Bank and Jerusalem? Or is the Israeli blockade/military occupation continue to block the extension of the Anglican Communion? Now that the Christian community there has decreased from 20% to ONE(1)percent when will the National Episcopal Church and our Anglican sister/brotherhood regard this as a High Priority to initiate/extend face-to-face compassionate action? In the Name of Our Dear Lord Jesus Christ, Palestinian Jew, we must adhere to our Baptismal Covenant and Witness for Justice for All those Voiceless and Vulnerable The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MSlast_img read more

Episcopalians, activists raise concerns about Michigan pipeline

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first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books December 7, 2016 at 8:31 pm “Although we are obviously using less (oil) than we have in the past, putting a pipeline in the Great Lakes and having a pipeline in the straits is just not a great idea.”63 years of accident-free service would seem to indicate this is not a factually-based concerned. Does Mr. Holtz really thing it would be safer to, say, drive that amount of oil and gas over the straits? How ridiculous. Reliable fuel transport is a life and death matter in that part of the country during the winter, and decisions should be based on science, not empty-headed platitudes. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Advocacy Peace & Justice December 24, 2016 at 4:59 pm Thanks to Bishop Ray, the church is finally publicly joining people of many denominations and political parties who have been spoken out against the pipeline for several years in Michigan, as well as local governments have voted against it. But where are the voices of the other 3 Michigan bishops whose people are affected by the pipeline? Their silence is disappointing, troubling. and demonstrates a lack of courage and compassion for all of God’s people and creation,Same company for the straits pipeline is the one responsible for the pipeline which broke and spilled into the river in Kalamazoo. Rector Shreveport, LA Kevin Miller says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis L B Ellwood-Filkins says: Edwina M Simpson says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem December 8, 2016 at 3:05 pm The best part about being an Episcopalian is that we can disagree on certain issues. From the information I have read here, I don’t really see how this could become too much of an issue. We just need to stay vigilant and make sure that the work being done is done properly. It doesn’t make sense to oppose every single pipeline. December 9, 2016 at 4:34 pm Sort of a “head-in-the-sand” issue. If the pipeline is taken out of service, the oil WILL flow in trucks on the road OVER THE WATER. Which is more likely, traffic accidents involving oil spilled INTO the water or a “possible” leak in the buried pipeline? At least the pipeline can be monitored for integrity and inspected remotely, if need be. By David PaulsenPosted Dec 7, 2016 Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA F William Thewalt says: December 11, 2016 at 9:24 pm Perhaps some of our pipe line experts and water protectors could now be dispatched to Nigeria where with their all knowing expertise, they could supervise the reconstruction of that Church that collapsed and killed so many people. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The five-mile Mackinac Bridge crosses the Straits of Mackinac, connecting Upper and Lower Michigan. Photo: Ann Wilson/Facebook[Episcopal News Service] Episcopalians were on the front lines of environmental advocacy when pipeline protesters claimed victory this week against a controversial segment of a North Dakota oil pipeline. Now, Episcopal leaders are stepping up again, this time in Michigan, to seek government intervention in response to concerns about another oil pipeline.In both cases, church leaders cite a spiritual calling to protect water resources as part of God’s creation.The Diocese of Northern Michigan announced Dec. 7 it was asking Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder to restrict the use of what is known as Line 5, a pipeline that carries oil and natural gas under the Straits of Mackinac, unless the state can guarantee there is no threat to public waters. The straits run between lower Michigan and the state’s Upper Peninsula and connect Lake Michigan with Lake Huron.“Without water, we can’t survive. Without water there would be no life for any of God’s creatures,” said Northern Michigan Bishop Rayford Ray in an interview with Episcopal News Service. “As people of faith, we believe we are stewards of God’s creation, so we are called to be advocates.”The diocese approved and Ray signed a resolution last month backing the recommendations of a state task force and pushing for an independent panel to verify Line 5 is safe.The Great Lakes are the largest freshwater system on earth; only the polar ice caps contain more fresh water.Activists in Michigan can draw encouragement from the results of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s high-profile protests of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Hundreds and at times thousands of “water protectors,” as the protesters and their allies self-identify, including Episcopalians, have been camped out since August at the site where Energy Transfer Partners had planned to extend the pipeline under the Missouri River at Lake Oahe, a key source of drinking water for the Standing Rock Reservation to its south.The standoff between protectors, authorities and construction crews sparked tense clashes and arrests while drawing national attention to the case. Presiding Bishop Michael Curry visited the protest camp in late September and was among the voices urging a halt to construction on that small segment of the pipeline.“I am grateful and humbled by the water protectors of Standing Rock, whose faithful witness serves as an example of moral courage, spiritual integrity and genuine concern for the entire human family and God’s creation,” Curry said Dec. 5  after the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers announced it was blocking the pipeline segment under Lake Oahe and recommending an alternative route be sought.Construction is complete on most of the rest of Dakota Access’ 1,172 miles of pipeline from the Bakken oil fields of northwest North Dakota to Patoka, Illinois. Energy Transfers had asserted that the pipeline – including the Lake Oahe crossing – is safe, economical and necessary to transport North Dakota oil to markets and refineries across the country and is not backing down.In Michigan, the pipeline already is in place and use under the Straits of Mackinac. Line 5 was built in 1953 and runs 645 miles from northern Wisconsin to Sarnia, Ontario, a little more than an hour northeast of Detroit.  The pipeline company, Enbridge Energy, is in the process of installing supports for the existing pipeline, not building a new segment.The Line 5 pipeline carries 540,000 barrels of natural gas and light crude oil a day. The company says 85 percent of residents in the Upper Peninsula and northern Michigan heat their homes with propane carried on Line 5.“Line 5 continues to deliver energy to Michigan residents safely and reliably every day,” spokesman Michael Barnes told the Detroit News. Enbridge has applied to the state for permission to install 19 support anchors as part of its maintenance of the 63-year-old pipeline. “We all have one goal in mind — the safe operations of Line 5 and protecting the Great Lakes, the environment, and everyone who uses these precious waterways.”But activists hope the decision in North Dakota could lead to greater scrutiny of existing and proposed pipelines elsewhere.“This is a message to federal and state agencies to prioritize water over oil transport in vulnerable areas like the Great Lakes,” Liz Kirkwood, executive director of the Michigan-based group For Love of Water, told the Detroit News after the North Dakota decision.The News noted that Line 5 has never suffered a major incident resulting in the release of oil or natural gas into the Great Lakes, though the 2010 rupture of an Enbridge pipeline in southern Michigan spilled oil into Kalamazoo River and raised concerns that similar ruptures could threaten other areas.Some activists are pushing to decommission the Straits of Mackinac crossing in favor of pursuing alternatives.“It’s just a bad place for a pipeline,” David Holtz, chairman of the Sierra Club’s Michigan Chapter, told the Times Herald in early December. “Although we are obviously using less (oil) than we have in the past, putting a pipeline in the Great Lakes and having a pipeline in the straits is just not a great idea.”— David Paulsen is a freelance writer based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and a member of Trinity Episcopal Church in Wauwatosa. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA December 9, 2016 at 9:23 am “63 years of accident-free service” is what concerns me … I would like to see the internal company reports on that. The company says there were no “major” incidents. What were the “minor” incidents? How many? How minor? And since these incidents are difficult to see (spilling under water rather than on top of land) – is the company basing its knowledge of “incident” merely on pressure in the pipeline? or some more reliable measure? I think we should not be too quick or flippant in our support of oil when it also impacts the freshwater of the Earth. Episcopalians, activists raise concerns about Michigan pipeline Rector Pittsburgh, PA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Mike McLane says: Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ronald Davin says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 December 9, 2016 at 4:44 pm Count me as one Episcopalian that is not concerned about the pipeline joining Michigan’s two peninsulas and providing energy to a area that receives serious cold weather in the winter. The long record of safety sways me as does the fact that all the hoopla will make Enbridge extra cautious. I simply cannot comprehend all the cries to revert to a situation where people are forced to pay more for energy just because some activists don’t like it. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments are closed. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC Selena Smith says: M. J. Wise says: Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA December 9, 2016 at 9:22 am Last summer Dan Musser, Mackinac Island resident and business owner, published an article in the Detroit Free Press that gave the clearest explanation of why the pipeline needs to be closed and another build in another location. For one thing the pipeline is old but more importantly the straits are not a good place for a pipeline, probably would not be allowed if being build today. The Great Lakes are key to US economy so is it really worth it to continue risking a breakage in that line. Just remember the Kalamazoo River pipeline breakage! Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments (8) Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

Anglican Alliance releases resources for observing Freedom Sunday in December

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first_img [Anglican Communion News Service] Churches throughout the Anglican Communion are expected to observe Freedom Sunday on or near Dec. 2 as part of increased efforts to tackle human trafficking and modern slavery. The Anglican Alliance has produced a resource pack, in English, Spanish, French and Portuguese, to help churches plan services and other events around Freedom Sunday, which this year falls on the UN’s International Day for the Abolition of Slavery. The resource pack includes stories, information, prayers and a sermon outline.Read the full article here. Posted Nov 10, 2017 Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Advocacy Peace & Justice, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Anglican Alliance releases resources for observing Freedom Sunday in December TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Anglican Communion, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Human Trafficking Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more

Lennon Yuan-Rung Chang elected next bishop of Taiwan

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first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Posted Aug 5, 2019 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Lennon Yuan-Rung Chang elected next bishop of Taiwan Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls The Rev. Lennon Yuan-Rung Chang was elected bishop of the Diocese of Taiwan on Aug. 3, 2019, at a special election convention held at St. James’ Episcopal Church, Taichung. Photo: Diocese of Taiwan.[Episcopal Diocese of Taiwan] The Episcopal Diocese of Taiwan elected the Rev. Lennon Yuan-Rung Chang, rector of Advent Church, Taipei, as its sixth bishop on Aug. 3, 2019, at a special election convention held at St. James’ Episcopal Church, Taichung.One of three nominees, Chang was elected on the second ballot. Nine clergy votes and 19 lay votes were necessary for election on that ballot; Chang received 11 clergy votes and 28 lay votes.The other nominees were the Rev. Lily Ling-Ling Chang, rector of St. James’ Episcopal Church, Taichung, and Rev. Joseph Ming-Lung Wu, vicar of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, Pingtung. All nominees came from within the diocese.Chang, 64, is married to Hannah Fen-Jan Wei, with two adult daughters and two small grandchildren. He graduated in 1975 with a diploma in industrial engineering from St. John’s and St. Mary’s Institute of Technology, the predecessor of St. John’s University, Taipei, where he was also baptized in 1970. Armed with bachelor’s and master’s degrees, and later a Ph.D., he was associate professor of mathematics at St. John’s University from 1983-2016. Chang’s theological training was through the diocesan Trinity Hall Theological Program, and after ordination as deacon in 1995 and priest in 1999, he became chaplain of St. John’s University (1997-2016) and vicar, later rector, of Advent Church on the St. John’s University campus, which serves as both university chapel and parish church.Chang is passionate about The Episcopal Church and the unique role of St. John’s University, with its Episcopal foundation and chaplaincy ministry. Leading students to Christ through the chaplaincy, nurturing them through discipleship, and leading them on short-term mission trips within Taiwan and overseas has been a blessing for the whole of the The Episcopal Church in Taiwan. He looks forward to continuing that ministry as bishop, focusing on mission and evangelization, leading the church forward in faith and witness. In his acceptance speech after the election, Chang said, “Building on the work of Bishop David J. H. Lai over the past 20 years, I will continue to go forth in the name of the Lord.” His inspiration and role model is Bishop James C. L. Wong (bishop of Taiwan, 1965-70, and founder of St. John’s University), whose motto was  “Transforming lives through the life of Christ.” Chang continued, “In the future, I will inherit Bishop James Wong’s legacy motto, to lead all of you to commit to this comprehensive mission.”Lai retires in March 2020, and pending consent of the majority of The Episcopal Church’s bishops and standing committees, Chang will be ordained, consecrated and installed as bishop of Taiwan on Feb. 22, 2020, with Presiding Bishop Michael Curry as chief consecrator. The Diocese of Taiwan is part of The Episcopal Church’s Province 8. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Elections Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel last_img read more

Ministerial Alliance Schedules Events to Condemn Violence

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first_img Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Please enter your comment! Reply Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 July 17, 2016 at 10:09 pm 1 COMMENT UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Previous articleBreaking: 7 Baton Rouge Police Officers ShotNext articleRally Supporting Law Enforcement at 8 AM Today Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img The South Apopka Ministerial Alliance has organized two events in response to the growing violence in the countryLate this afternoon the Alliance sent the flowing email:Pastors, Community Leaders & Concerned Citizens, (Apopka & Orlando)We are asking that you join us for a conference call at 7:00 PM this evening to condemn the growing violence that we are witnessing around the country. This conference call will be specific to,1. Condemning violence, violence against law enforcement and violence occurring in communities that witness a disproportionate number of calls for service from law enforcement to address this violence.2. To address support from pastors, community leaders and ALL interested persons to attend an 8am press conference tomorrow morning on the steps of City of Apopka City Hall 120 E. Main Street, Apopka, FL to publicly condemn these acts of violence and to stand should to shoulder with law enforcement, clergy, community residents, business owners and government officials to demonstrate our unity.Conference Call Dial in # (605) 475-4000, then the participant access code is 138344#We encourage your participation on this call. We will not keep you long, just long enough to convey this important message and to pray for our country, law enforcement and more importantly, to pray for peace and harmony…The email was signed by Pastor Hezekiah Bradford and Pastor Richard King of the South Apopka Ministerial Alliance LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter I am praying for our community, as we don’t want any more violence in our city, we have enough of that now. It serves no purpose, and is not good for our nation. I look at the American flags that are almost always at half-staff now days, and think how awful, that this seems like a sign of the times. We never used to see the flags flown at half-staff that often, and when we see the flags down, we know someone or some groups have fallen, and lost their lives to some type of violence, or some head of state has passed away. Only an evil person would promote violence. It must stop. Our future generations deserve better than living in this current state of violent turmoil around country, and thinking this is normal. God bless our community, and let’s unite and say no to violence from any source. Please enter your name here Mama Mia Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Who founded Labor Day?

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first_img Mama Mia Reply TAGSLabor Day Previous articleOn this day: The first American ATM opensNext articleChildhood Cancer – How We Inspire Hope Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR September 2, 2017 at 5:30 pm Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Happy Labor Day Weekend everybody! Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 1 COMMENTcenter_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Please enter your comment! Who founded Labor Day?  Peter McGuire or Matthew Maguire?More than 120 years after the first Labor Day observance, there is still some doubt as to who first proposed the holiday for workers.Some records show that Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, was first in suggesting a day to honor those “who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold.”But Peter McGuire’s place in Labor Day history has not gone unchallenged.Many believe that Matthew Maguire, a machinist, not Peter McGuire, founded the holiday. Recent research seems to support the contention that Matthew Maguire, later the secretary of Local 344 of the International Association of Machinists in Paterson, N.J., proposed the holiday in 1882 while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York. What is clear is that the Central Labor Union adopted a Labor Day proposal and appointed a committee to plan a demonstration and picnic.Following the deaths of workers at the hands of United States Army and United States Marshals Service during the Pullman Strike of 1894, the United States Congress unanimously voted to approve legislation to make Labor Day a national holiday and President Grover Cleveland signed it into law six days after the end of the strike.Cleveland supported the creation of the national holiday in an attempt to shore up support among trade unions following the Pullman Strike. The date of May 1 (an ancient European holiday known as May Day) was an alternative date, celebrated then (and now) as International Workers Day, but President Cleveland was concerned that observance of Labor Day on May 1 would encourage Haymarket-style protests and would strengthen socialist and anarchist movements that, though distinct from one another, had rallied to commemorate the Haymarket Affair in International Workers’ Day. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom last_img read more

The reintroduction of fun

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first_img Please enter your name here The VOICE of InspirationBy Don Lindsey.On Wednesday, my wife Tammy and I were able to take a much-needed date to Universal Studio’s theme park.  I’m sure many couples can relate to how hard it is to find some time to go on a date. Thankfully for us, Tammy was on vacation this past week, so when her friend from work offered her tickets, we were excited and confident that we would have a great time.We weren’t wrong.We got up early, went to our nearby Wawa for a carry out breakfast and then set out on our adventure for the day.  With Universal being the closest of all the theme parks and our early start, we were able to make it to our destination before the place got too crowded.  After entering the park, we made a beeline for the Harry Potter section.  While I have seen the movies and thought that they were good, I still wasn’t a fan.  Tammy, however, is a mega-fan.Seeing her face light up as we walked through the re-creation of the town from the movie was in itself a treat. She bounced from shop to shop, looking at every exhibit and thoroughly taking in every detail and doing so with a massive smile on her face.  She wanted to ride the main roller coaster in that area of the park. I can’t remember the name of it, but it was a combination of an Imax theater and roller coaster.  It was also the only thing that Tammy didn’t like from Potterville due to motion sickness and the main thing that I loved.As the coaster roared on its track, and the main scene played out before me, I laughed and yelled as I along with the rest of my coaster-mates were flung around in every direction.  The scenery switched from Imax-like scenes to a cave setting with lots of creepy stuff jumping around. When we got off the ride, I could not wait to go on it again.  I could see that Tammy would not be able to as she kept shifting from one shade of green to the next, so we agreed that before we left, I would ride the coaster again while she shopped.  The rest of the day we spent roaming the park and finding a couple of rides that Tammy was able to enjoy before heading home.  All in all, it was a fantastic day spent with my wife and could not have been more fun.While Tammy and I had a blast at Universal, our daughter didn’t get to go as we only had two tickets, so I came up with the idea of taking her on a dad/daughter date, something she’s been asking for the last couple of weeks.  We ate at her favorite restaurant and then went to Cranes Roost, where to my surprise, there is an art expo going on.  Everything she loves such as art, crafts, and music all in one area!  I couldn’t have planned it better if I had tried.  I had a great time watching her bounce around the different tents checking out all the different displays.  After ending the day with ice cream at Baskin Robins, we headed home, and, on the way, she looked at me and told me how much she appreciated the day out which made it even more worthwhile.What I’ve learned through these two events is that I do not have enough fun in my life.  My wife and I were talking about this.  Sometimes we get into such a groove as employees, mothers, fathers, and such that we end up being obsessed with our routines.As Tammy put it, “we get to a place in our lives where we just exist.”That’s not living a full life and as I’ve learned through my reintroduction of fun in the last week.  A full life must have fun of some sort. It doesn’t have to be a trip to a theme park; it could be something as simple as ice cream with your kids.Wherever you find fun, take advantage because, without it, life can be pretty dull. Don Lindsey Donny, I know that you will agree with me when I say how wonderful it is when you have family to play and laugh with, especially factoring in the entertainment value of when your wife turns that wonderfully entertaining shade of bluish-yellow-green. Motion sickness is really a delite when its happening to someone else, don’t you agree? Good on you and yours pal. Chaz UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Mama Mia TAGSDon LindseyInspiration Previous articleWhich pizza chain is the best?Next articleThe oneness of humanity Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom March 24, 2018 at 10:05 pm March 25, 2018 at 11:35 am 4 COMMENTS It certainly is wonderful having such a great family, and the honor to have the people in my life that I do. I don’t get motion sickness too much any more as I did as a child and good thing too, that stuff is miserable. Thanks for the comment my friend and as always, God bless! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Don Lindsey March 25, 2018 at 1:04 pm Please enter your comment! Don Lindsey is a follower of Christ, son, husband, father, and a survivor.  Originally from Dayton Ohio, and resident of Apopka for six years, Don sees his life as a dedication to his wife, parents, children, and community. Did you try the butterbeer? If you did, was it all that great, like they claim it is? Glad you all had a great day out together. I need to find a new place to go for fun, somewhere different. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Never tried that, but we certainly did have fun! Thanks for the comment Mia, God bless! Reply Reply Reply charles towne March 26, 2018 at 7:50 am Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Christine Moore: “I’m an advocate for these families and I take…

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first_img The Anatomy of Fear Candidate Feature – District 7 incumbent Christine MooreChristine Moore: OCPS             District 7 Incumbent.Christine Moore is a political institution in Apopka. Over the last two election cycles, she has been a campaign manager and consultant for mayoral and city commission elections, and for the past eight years has been on the Orange County Public School Board representing District 7 which includes all of Apopka. The two-term incumbent is running for a third term against Isadora Dean, Matthew Fitzpatrick and Laura Rounds – all first-time candidates.And its her experience and diversity of qualifications that Moore points to in separating herself from her opponents.“Being a member of the school board is not like being the president of a union or being a principal. It’s more like being a CEO. You wear a lot of hats and a diversity of experience is important. I have a well-rounded background in education, music, business and politics. I am board certified from the Florida School Boards Association. I have overseen the construction of a dozen new schools. I understand the position and know which issues are regulated by the state and those which fall under the purview of the district. I have extensive work with budgets.  I graduated at the top of my class in music education from the University of Michigan. I have extensive business experience in real estate investments and consulting. I have been active in numerous community service organizations and served on three Orange County boards. I’m currently on the United Arts Board and the Mayor’s Committee on Child Abuse.  I’ve had my own company, and I have a lot of experience on the political side in navigating things with elected officials. A broad background is good. It’s how you are effective on the School Board.”In today’s political climate, incumbency, political experience and being a part of the system is looked at as a liability by some. Certainly in Apopka, incumbents have not fared well in the past few years, but Moore cannot deny she is the establishment candidate in this race. She leads in name recognition, fundraising, and has been endorsed by the West Orange Political Alliance, Orlando Board of Realtors, Central Florida Hotel and Lodging Association, Associated Builders and Contractors, BusinessFORCE, Conservative Ministers of Central Florida, OCPS Board Chairman Bill Sublette and other board members, teachers and local officials.However Moore embraces the idea of being a part of the system and  thinks its necessary in order to function successfully.“Before you run you should clearly know the system. I know how to work within it to get things done. You have to understand the deck of cards you have. Now there’s times when you don’t like the deck and there are ways to deal with that too, once you understand the job description. Tallahassee controls a lot of the policies. A couple of my opponents… if you read their entire platform… they should be running for the Legislature. They don’t really understand the job description.”Moore sees the job of  board member as part lobbyist, part budget expert, part spokesperson and part “mother bear”.“Clearly you’re an advocate. You do a lot of constituent service. If someone has a problem, I always tell them to send me an email and I’ll forward it to the right person and follow up.”Moore has received several emails from her constituents  and heard the frustrations of local parents on an issue you may not expect to be on the forefront – recess. Moore understands their concerns and says it is an ongoing issue at the school board and legislative levels.“I’m for recess. We’re all for recess. The recess moms came to us a little over a year ago and they have a valid point. Everything is about school grades. And the principals are concerned because the Legislature ties school grades to salaries… so what was happening was they were working these kids from the minute they got to school until they left. There was no recess and the kids need recess. So the Board went back through area superintendents and asked them to have recess on every day except Wednesday. This particular group (of parents) has particular language that they want, so we’re going to have a work session to work out the details.”For some teachers and principals, the Marzano Teacher Evaluations has become a challenge that Moore would like to do something about, but she thinks lobbying Tallahassee will be the better strategy to effect change.“The state passed a law four or five years ago that teachers had to be evaluated. It’s too heavy handed in some respects, but it’s state law… so the issue is you have to go back to Tallahassee and lobby against it. There are all these best practices that Robert Marzano, an education expert, put in place… but he never envisioned it to be used to rate a teacher. He meant it to be best practices, so now we have scoring and evaluations based on it. The state has required too many of these Marzano Best Practices and its overwhelming… too much too fast. And that’s where you hear angst.”Despite the larger issues of a massive OCPS budget, Moore is conscious of the families and of the demographics of District 7.We pass a budget, but we don’t set a millage rate, so all of our funding goes through Tallahassee and comes back on a “per-student” basis. It’s nearly a four billion dollar budget, and you have to work with other municipalities, you have to lobby and all sorts of things like that, but you also have to keep in mind this district has a high degree of poverty…so when you’re representing the parents and students of District 7, you really have to have the mindset that you are the mother bear for a lot of families that don’t have the ability, time or where-with-all to advocate. Zellwood got rebuilt, Wheatley got rebuilt. Lovell got rebuilt. Dream Lake is 75% free or reduced lunch. I’m an advocate for these families and I take that seriously.” Please enter your name here As a leader of the Orange County recess effort, I feel I’m in the best position of anyone to comment on Ms. Moore’s misstatements. First, we went before the board in January of 2015, WELL over a year ago. We started this effort even further back, in October 2014. At that time my older boys were in second grade and my youngest was only four. They’re now fourth graders and a first graders. Because our school board refused to implement a 20-minute daily recess policy, we had to go to our legislators to solve a problem that could and should have been solved locally. As a result, we’ve been lobbying on a bill that would allow our children a daily unstructured break. Ms. Moore is 100% WRONG when she says the board went to area superintendents and directed them to give elementary children recess four days a week. In reality, the most our board would agree to was a resolution recommending (not even requiring) recess on non-PE days – that is zero to two days per week, absolutely unacceptable. While Ms. Moore has chosen to dishonestly paint herself as a friend to our effort and a supporter of recess, she is the board member from which we have received the MOST excuses for her refusal to support a daily recess policy. That she would now use our tireless advocacy on an issue that has widespread support to support her reelection campaign is abhorrent. It is all we can do not to vomit. Do not be fooled. This woman cares most about herself. Just a reminder Christine…….speed limit signs along certain school frontages still needed badly. A disaster waiting to happen, and I am serious about that too. Angela Browning Mama Mia Mama Mia August 27, 2016 at 10:09 pm Reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply A lot of talk about testing in the schools. As adults we too have a very important test that we are asked to take. We can opt out, but on this test, we really shouldn’t. And the test we are asked to take affects our everyday life, our finances, and even our general happiness. What is the test? The election. The shading in of the bubble on the ballot. Or the vote by mail, if that is what you chose. It is our test, as citizens, and so important. If you haven’t voted, please do so. Voting will continue today. Then your last chance to vote will be on Election Day on Tues. Aug 30th, 2016, for this round, then not again until the big one in November. So take the test, at least this test!!!! Reply center_img Christine, so you are a “mother bear”…….(your words) ??? Is this sort of a play off of Sarah Palin’s calling herself “Mama Grizzly”??? Oh dear me……..!!! Just like the school kids…….do your homework. Check out all of the candidates, everything you can on them, and what they believe in, and what they say. You may get fooled, every voter does sooner or later, just don’t get fooled again. It is like a rite of passage almost. Mama Mia TAGSChristine MooreDistrict 7Orange County School Baord Previous articleInspirational college football film opens todayNext articleApopka routs Ocoee 62-7 in season opener Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR August 27, 2016 at 10:27 pm Reply Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate August 29, 2016 at 2:33 pm Reply 5 COMMENTS Mama Mia Please enter your comment! August 28, 2016 at 12:19 am August 28, 2016 at 12:35 am Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Apopka hosting Firefighter Combat Challenge this month

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first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment! The Anatomy of Fear Two days of competitions and family fun From the City of ApopkaTeams of firefighters from around the nation will converge on Apopka next week for the ultimate challenge of physical agility, speed, and life-saving skills.The nationally touring Scott Safety Firefighter Combat Challenge will make its only Florida stop this year from 3 to 9 p.m. May 12 and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 13 at the Apopka Sam’s Club, 1500 S. Orange Blossom Trail. Activities include two days of races as well as a free Kids Firefighter Challenge, fire trucks, displays, music and more.Firefighters – and even local law enforcement officers – will compete in individual and team events set across a nearly 200-foot-long race course that includes climbing a five-story tower, hoisting, chopping, dragging hoses and rescuing a life-sized, 175 lb., “victim” while wearing 70 pounds of firefighting bunker gear.Participants race against an opponent and the clock, simulating the rigorous physical demands of real-life firefighting. The Challenge encourages a lifelong commitment to physical fitness, health, and wellness – all in support of public safety. Winners will qualify for a chance to compete against first responders from around the world at the World Firefighter Combat ChallengeOct. 23-28 in Louisville, Ky.Many competitors train all year and race in numerous states with a single focus to mark the fastest time on this grueling course. Apopka’s event will include first responders from other states and across Central Florida for what is called the toughest two minutes in sports. Local law enforcement SWAT teams also are invited to challenge the course.“The City of Apopka and Apopka firefighters are honored to host the Scott Safety Firefighter Combat Challenge on May 12-13,” said Apopka Fire Chief Chuck Carnesale. “We invite firefighters to join us for the competition, and we invite the community to come out and cheer them on.”The Kids Firefighter Challenge is a scaled-down version of the combat challenge with full-size fun. Each child carries a shoulder load of hose, climbs to the top of our 12-foot inflatable tower, slides to the bottom, where they “stop, drop and roll.” Then they crawl through a tunnel, work the miniature Keiser Force Machine with the supplied mallet, advance a simulated wildland fire line with authentic nozzle striking a target and finally “make the rescue” with an appropriately sized mannequin.Spectator admission to the Scott Safety Firefighter Combat Challenge is free. Enjoy health and fire safety displays, music and food. For more information, visit www.apopkachallenge.com.The Apopka event is presented through generous support from Sam’s Club, Qorvo, Dan Newlin & Partners, Greenbrier Afterlife Pet Care Specialists, the City of Apopka and other local businesses and organizations. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 TAGSApopka Fire DepartmentCity of ApopkaFirefighter Combat Challenge Previous article300 marchers bring their message to Apopka: “Si Se Puede”Next article5 Reasons to Stay Hydrated This Summer Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your name here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Florida Hospital Apopka part of RN hiring event this month

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first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Candidates can interview at seven Florida Hospital campuses. From Florida Hospital   Florida Hospital will host a job fair on Tuesday, January 23rd from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.HR managers will conduct on-site interviews for RN and GN positions which offer competitive wages and immediate benefits. Select experienced full-time RN positions are also eligible for a sign-on bonus of up to $10,000. Full bonus and/or relocation details will be available during the interview process.The hiring event will take place at the following locations:Altamonte CampusAddress: 651 East Altamonte Drive, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701Location: Family Resource Center (Beside the Dunkin Donuts)Parking: Parking Lot A at Florida Hospital AltamonteApopka CampusAddress: 2100 Ocoee-Apopka Rd, Apopka, FL 32703Location: Conference Centre inside the hospitalParking: Easy access parking in front of the hospital. Enter through the main lobby.Celebration CampusAddress: 400 Celebration Place, Celebration, FL 34747Location: Mangrove Conference Room, 1st FloorParking: Free valet or easy access self-parking in parking garageEast Orlando CampusAddress: 7727 Lake Underhill Road Orlando, FL 32822Location: Precedo Conference Center, Rooms C, D, and EParking: Park in front of building and enter through main hospital entrance.Kissimmee CampusAddress: 2400 North Orange Blossom Trail Kissimmee, FL 34744Location: Woodlands Conference Room A & B (inside the Medical Plaza)Easy access parking available next to Main Entrance, parking lot off of Orange Blossom TrailOrlando Campus (Includes Florida Hospital Orlando, Florida Hospital for Children and Florida Hospital for Women) Address: 601 East Rollins Street Orlando, FL 32803Location: Ginsburg Tower – Creation Conference CenterParking: McRae parking garage or valet parking (will be validated)Winter Park CampusAddress: 200 North Lakemont Winter Park, FL 32792Location: South Conference Room (maps available in the main lobby at the front desk)Parking: Complimentary valet parking at main entrance.Those interested in joining Florida Hospital’s nursing team are encouraged to apply at www.workatfloridahospital.com and pre-register for the event. Graduate nurses are welcome to apply. After filling out the online application, selected applicants will be contacted and invited to the event via email.For more information, please visit www.workatfloridahospital.com Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 TAGSFlorida HospitalHiringRN Previous articleNew medical advances marking the end of a long reign for ‘diet wizards’Next articleThe Apopka tornado of 1918 remembered on Thursday Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The Anatomy of Fear Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more