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Blue Bulls end winless streak against Cheetahs

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first_imgBorder Bulldogs (15) – Tries: Matthew Taljaard, Onke Dumase; Conversion: Byron McGuigan; Pens: McGuigan. Valke (43) – Tries: Coert Cronje, Warren Perkins, Chris Ehlers, Kyle Hendricks, Willie Odendaal, Reg Muller, Marco Kotze; Conversions: Hendricks (4). Bulls: Rossouw De Klerk (L), Gary Botha (C) and Dean Greyling (R)The Vodacom Blue Bulls ended their winless run in the 2011 Vodacom Cup after they recorded their first victory of the competition at Shimla Park following their 45-21 victory over the Toyota Free State Cheetahs on Friday night.The defending champions conceded defeats against the DHL Western Province (32-29), Pampas XV (27-22), Boland Cavaliers (20-17) and the Sharks XV (30-19) earlier this season. However the Pretoria team bounced back to winning ways and were impressive against the Free Staters by running in seven tries en-route to their first win of the campaign.Captain Juandre Kruger, Clayton Blommetjies, Gerrit-Jan van Velze, Marnus Schoeman, Corne Fourie, Stefan Watermeyer and William Small-Smith were the try-scorers for the visitors. Flyhalf Marnitz Boshoff kicked two conversions while Watermeyer converted three five-pointers.Former SA Under-20 prop Marcel van der Merwe and Robert van Schalkwyk were the try-scorers for the Toyota Free State Cheetahs. Flyhalf Louis Strydom kicked two penalties and a drop goal while former DHL Western Province centre Morgan Newman added a conversion for the Bloemfontein team.DHL Western Province flyhalf Gary van Aswegen converted a try by flanker Wimpie van der Walt which was scored in the final minute of the match against GWK Griquas to ensure that the Cape team maintained their undefeated record this season following their 23-22 victory at Newlands on Saturday.The Kimberley team, thanks to their bonus point achieved in their match against DHL WP for losing within seven, ensured that they ended round five in joint first position on the North Section log with the Ford Pumas who defeated the Boland Cavaliers 26-17 in Wellington on Saturday. The GWK Griquas’ superior points’ differential over the Witbank team resulted in them occupying first position at the conclusion of round five.The Golden Lions consigned the Eastern Province Kings to their first defeat of the 2011 Vodacom Cup after they secured an 11-10 victory at the Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium. Both teams scored one try with the Johannesburg team’s five-pointer being scored by Dusty Noble and the hosts’ try by Clint Newland. Jaco van Schalkwyk kicked a penalty and converted Newland’s try. However the difference between the two teams proved ultimately to be as a result of the kicking boot of flyhalf Burton Francis who kicked two penalties for the visitors.The Sharks returned to winning ways in emphatic style in Empangeni on Saturday following their comprehensive 63-7 victory over the Tasol Solar Griffons. The Durban team were full of running and scored nine tries against their Welkom opponents.Ross Cronje, Kobus de Kock, Riaan Swanepoel, Mark Richards, Daniel Adongo, Marcell Coetzee, Jerome Pretorius, Piet Lindeque and Rosco Specman were the Sharks XV players were scored five-pointers while flyhalf Guy Cronje kicked nine conversions. Werner Griesel was the sole try-scorer for the Tasol Solar Griffons. His try was converted by Tiaan van Wyk.Meanwhile the Pampas XV moved in to pole position on the South Section log following their 38-20 victory over the Platinum Leopards in Potchefstroom on Saturday while the Valke notched up their first win in this season’s competition following their 43-15 win over the Border Bulldogs. PRETORIA, SOUTH AFRICA – MARCH 26: Dean Greyling (R) and Bulls team-mates during the Vodacom Super Rugby match between Vodacom Bulls and Lions at Loftus Versfeld Stadium on March 26, 2011 in Pretoria, South Africa.. (Photo by Dominic Barnardt/Gallo Images/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS In the other Vodacom Cup match of the weekend, the SWD Eagles consigned the Welwitschias to their fifth defeat of the competition following their 34-27 victory at the Outeniqua Park Stadium in George on Friday evening.Scores for the round…Vodacom Blue Bulls (45) Tries: Juandre Kruger, Clayton Blommetjies, Gerrit-Jan van Velze, Marnus Schoeman, Corne Fourie, Stefan Watermeyer, William Small-Smith; Conversions: Marnitz Boshoff (2), Watermeyer (3) Toyota Free State Cheetahs (21)– Tries: Robert van Schalkwyk, Marcel van der Merwe; Conversions: Morgan Newman; Pens: Louis Strydom (2); Drop goal: Strydom.DHL Western Province (23) – Tries: Johann Sadie, Wimpie van der Walt; Conversions: Gary van Aswegen (2); Pens: Van Aswegen (3). GWK Griquas (22) – Tries: Richard Lawson, Wesley Wilkens, Leon Karemaker; Conversions: Earl Rose (2); Pens: Rose.Pampas XV (38) – Tries: Agustin Gosio (2), Juan Imhoff, Mariano Galarza, Tomas Cubelli; Conversions: Santiago Gonzalez Iglesias; Pens: Iglesias. Platinum Leopards (20) – Tries: Christo van Niekerk, Johannes Seerane, Joubert Engelbrecht; Conversion: Clayton Durand; Pens: Durand.EP Kings (10) – Try: Clint Newland; Conversion: Jaco van Schalkwyk; Pens: Van Schalkwyk. Golden Lions (11) – Try: Dusty Noble; Pens: Burton Francis (2).Sharks XV (63) – Tries: Ross Cronje, Kobus de Kock, Riaan Swanepoel, Mark Richards, Daniel Adongo, Marcell Coetzee, Jerome Pretorius, Piet Lindeque, Rosco Specman; Conversions: Guy Cronje (9). Tasol Solar Griffons (7) – Try: Werner Griesel; Conversion: Tiaan van Wyk.Boland Cavaliers (17) – Tries: Jonathan Francke, Rossouw Kruger; Conversions: Willie le Roux (2); Pens: Le Roux. Ford Pumas (26) – Tries: Rudi Mathee, JW Jonker, Penalty try; Conversion: Coenie van Wyk; Pens: Van Wyk (3).SWD Eagles (34) – Tries: Clint Wagman, Dean Hopp, Howard Noble, Henk Eksteen, Brood van der Westhuizen, Deroy Rhoode; Conversions: Ambrose Barends (2). Welwitschias (27) – Tries: Sergio de la Harpe, PJ van Lill, Vaughan Pietersen, Chrysander Botha; Conversions: Botha (2); Penalties: Botha.last_img read more

Chronic Pain, Cannabis and Rugby

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first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. IN 2019, former Newcastle, Yorkshire and London Welsh back-row Ed Williamson told Martha Kelner of Sky News all about his troubles with opioid addiction as a player.Today, he lives in France and throws himself into art. He has had a catalogue of surgeries, and while he still has an emergency box of ‘odds and sods’ painkillers left over from so many scrapes with the scalpel, he has tried other methods of gaining relief.“I was always really tight and around the time around my neck operation last year, in the nine months leading up to that I couldn’t turn my neck to the left, past a couple of degrees,” he says. “My traps were ridiculously tense.“I smoked a bit of weed and over the next hour they eased off just enough for me to relax, breath a little bit. It was enough just to be a little bit less tense in my neck and my head.“It might have been just a nice, temporary release of the tensions and pain that I had. Which I would have got with the painkillers. But then the problem I had with the painkillers was also getting a lot of residual effects.” “THERE’S THIS sort of idea that in sport, chronic pain doesn’t exist,” says Richmond Stace, physiotherapist turned pain coach.“It exists everywhere in every level of society, it just has different terms. Sports medicine teams are fantastic at dealing with acute injuries and pitchside scenarios, but the model is just not the right one for dealing with ongoing problems or recurring problems or chronic pain.”Stace, who worked with England Women in the early 2000s, says that he became disillusioned with “patching people up” as a physio. The idea is that we all buy into the notion that pain must be related to an injury in that specific location where it hurts, and focusing treatment on that one area will fix the problem.With chronic pain, he says, there needs to be more.“The first thing that needs to happen is to create some time and some space to really talk to a player,” Stace says. “But of course it also then depends on the player’s view because they’ve been brought up in this culture – a lot of players will still be thinking that the pain is very much related to something in their knee or their back.“It takes a brave person to think, ‘well actually, my emotional state plays a huge role in this pain. My expectations, my dreams, my hopes play a huge role’. When it comes to research, there are lots of studies being done on all of these things, so what we’re talking about here might sound different or ‘alternative’, but with research on pain and these dimensions on it, there’s a lot out there.”“Break the stigma”: Ardie Savea’s personalised gum boots (Getty Images)He jokes that things would not get so deep so early with athletes – you need to build up to the big issues. Stace does also say that with acute injury, current accepted practice and painkiller use in the first instance is important. But he is not alone in wanting to step away from the traditional approach when it comes to the chronic.Physiotherapist and lecturer Mike Stewart (alongside Dr Ware) helped put together the International Olympic Committee’s IOC consensus statement on pain management in elite athletes paper that came out in 2017. He is also fascinated with the language we use. For example, he has found that in some situations, in sport or in the military, discussions around injury and pain can include insult and punishment for the perceived ‘weakness’.It is also a very Western approach, he says, to be bombarded with talk of a healthcare scare followed by a fix. There is a sense of the restitutional about it. We all want a silver bullet to instantly take the pain away.Yet in the absence of this, he says, we see certain approaches to treating pain repeat over and over: when you go beyond the acute, it’s painkillers as the small troops. Then if pain lingers, send in the tanks of physio treatment and injections. Lingering still? The nuclear option is surgery.For him, seeing youngsters with laundry lists of surgeries is tantamount to medical negligence.Read next: IS IT TIME TO RETHINK STRENGTH & CONDITIONING IN RUGBY?Stewart believes that looking at acceptance commitment therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy and mindfulness is a good place to start (Harlequins, for example, use a mindfulness coach). And we need to consider the language we use. As he explains: “Studies here in the UK have found that 99% of the undergraduate hours that clinicians spend training for is based in pathology, biomechanics, anatomy. So that leaves less than 1% of the hours that these people spend in training for psychology, communication skills, looking at how to build resilience and self-efficacy. Which is crucial in sport.All too familiar?: A treatment table (Getty Images)“Look at somebody who keeps getting recurring injuries and then they feel like their bodies are falling apart and they essentially don’t have the skills to deal with these really complex, challenging problems. Which are (hard) enough outside of a sporting environment but put them into sport and it sort of magnifies.”Think of the stresses a young star faces. Pressure to perform, to earn, to win, and then you interact with the world around you and, gasp, have you had a look at social media, mate? Perhaps it does magnify. And yet, in some spaces, at the highest level, are we divorcing physical trauma with mental trauma and vice versa?Dr Darren Britton is a sports psychologist and lecturer at Solent University. “Psychology now is being integrated a lot better at every single level of organisations, be it with clubs or national governing bodies or whatever. So rather than psychology operating in these little silos, it’s being integrated into every aspect of the organisation,” he says.“It still has a long way to go. I would say there’s still a lot of inconsistency. Some sports organisations do psychology really, really well. There are others who still are years behind in how they integrate psychology and psychologists into what they do.“Some will still operate with the same old approach of weaving psychologists in one day a week to have a chat with this person or that person. Rather than seeing it as something that actually needs to be integrated into everything that goes on within the organisation.“For years the stereotype was of a psychologist being a fixer, a firefighter. If you’ve got a problem you go to the sports psychologist, rather than sports psychology being seen as proactive.”Financial peril: Rugby faces tough times (Getty Images)The fear is that in dire financial times, this aspect is the easiest to cut. You may just bring in your fixer less and less.In the first instance, Dr Britton believes pro clubs should work with figures with certain qualifications as standard – from the British Psychological Society or British Association of Sports and Exercise Sciences – and registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), rather than, say, the popular public speaker.He says that increased stress levels can increase the risk of injury, with increased muscle tension, the effect on concentration and missing cues, the impact on sleep and other mechanisms. So prepare to address that. Stewart would like to see sports medics actively updating their understanding of chronic pain and whole non-medical staff (like coaches and others) buying into that too.The idea of the ‘holistic’ may make you wince. But as we consider how far understanding of certain medications is still to come, and if we accept that exceptional sports medics continually seek to improve, would it be better for more to now embrace the psychological side and address how we talk about pain as well?Perhaps it is just the right small step. For now. PAIN WILL forever be a part of collision sport. We accept this now. But at some point, in another part of the world, some ask about the cost.“We’ve done a lot of work and engaged with our former athletes and you almost have a direct correlation between (long-term) painkiller usage and things like depression and issues with mental health,” says George Atallah, of the NFL Players Association. “There is no doubt about that. And I think once we found a direct correlation between those things, that’s what triggered us to look at ways to prevent.“You can clearly load up on a bunch of painkillers and play, or you might have to take them to get out of bed after you’ve had a collision. But what is the impact on your long-term mental health (if you do it repeatedly)?“It is still a concern; it’s not fixed yet.”The above is about American Football, not rugby, and looks more at long-term opioid use well beyond acute injury – in this part of the world we may be more familiar with opioids like codeine or tramadol which are not recommended for long-term, chronic pain management.But there are a few reasons why we start there. Bear with us.Facing the pain: The risks facing NFL stars are well documented (Getty Images)In 2017, Rugby World took a long look at the culture of painkiller use in our Playing Through The Pain feature. In the years since, the topic has washed in and out of public discourse. We have heard some former rugby internationals detail their broken histories of injuries and their relationships with pills and pain. They want to talk about their futures too.So three years on, we had to come back to the topic. Not because of any sense of things worsening or to raise panic but to take a different view.If we accept that pain is a given, that team medics should have players’ best interests at heart and that brave athletes must make peace with the aches of oncoming years, could we approach chronic pain management differently?Which can mean looking at other sports, other treatments, other mindsets. And being wary of what athletes in rugby and other comparable competitions are exploring to alleviate their pain.That brings us back to the NFL and quickly on to the discussion about using cannabis-based products.The US sport does not adhere to the World Anti-Doping Agency’s code, while rugby does, but chat of weed is spreading. In March, a collective bargaining agreement for the NFL was reached that relaxed their rules on testing for cannabis.Atallah, assistant executive director of external affairs, explains that in late 2017, the NFLPA set up a committee to look at cannabis but also opioid use, as part of a “wide-ranging look at pain management”. He says they also looked at training methodology, recovery methodology, nutrition. Then in January 2018, cannabidiol (CBD, a product that can be produced without the psychoactive compound tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the part of cannabis that creates the ‘high’), was removed from WADA’s banned list, and it became possible for rugby players to use CBD products, including CBD oil.Talking point: CBD products are focus of a national discussion (Getty)The NFLPA formed their own task force, Atallah says, because so many people around their sport had competing interests. Politics is never far away, particularly with the issue of legalisation and varied approaches to cannabis across states and nations. But he adds, “We certainly talk to other sports and sports unions (about this issue). I think what I’m primarily trying to convey is that the athletes are the ones who are advocating to protect themselves. And the leagues don’t really push the envelope on this issue in a comprehensive way.“I think we (collision sports) should all be learning from each other, yes.”Again, the laws on what substances are prohibited in rugby and Football are very different, but in this instance it is being recommended that dialogues stretch across sports.Glenn Healy, a former National Hockey League goaltender and current NHL Alumni Association president, would appreciate that.“If someone’s got a better mousetrap than I do, please share it with me,” he says.“We want to make tomorrow better than today for a whole bunch of players and making tomorrow better might mean something like more sleep, less anxiety, less depression, more functional integration with your world.“I’m just looking for where I don’t have to come up with the answer to this question: ‘How did we get here with this player?’ How did it get to this?“So your rugby player that was probably revered around the world, how do we get there with him? I don’t want to have another call from a wife or a kid saying, ‘I want my husband back’ or ‘I want my dad back’, because things are not going the way they should be going.”Exploring new avenues: The physical NHL (Getty Images)Healy says that when it was announced that the NHLAA would partner with the Canopy Growth cannabis company in Canada, to look for alternative treatments, he expected a backlash from some disgusted members. But he claims all he heard were thanks “for going to the corners on this”.This is another point where rugby players may be interested. Because the use of CBD is a hot topic in the sport. In August, researchers at Liverpool John Moores University found that more than 25% of 517 union and league players surveyed use or have used CBD oil (despite warnings not to – but more on that in our companion piece).It is spoken about as a godsend. Yet as Dr Mark Ware, chief medical officer at Canopy Growth, says: “Unfortunately for CBD in particular there is nothing (by way of extensive research) on human pain and CBD. It’s astonishing that we don’t have data on that.Read next: THE PROBLEMS WITH CBD OIL EXPLAINED“With THC: different story. There’s way more information on neuropathic pain, spasticity, nausea, anxiety – there’s a ton of stuff. Some of it’s small and it’s not super strong but at least there’s data, there are trials that suggest THC is a pretty good analgesic in chronic pain management.“But with CBD the jury’s still out.”It’s perhaps not what some will want to hear. But in a sea of anecdotes, the scientists will want more. And it’s understandable why.Information about the risks of CBD use are out there – as with the Liverpool John Moores report. But the same study highlights that professional athletes are seeking out the products.Ware describes this as being athlete-driven, adding that something similar is being observed in clinics, with chronic pain sufferers who “will use and say ‘I don’t care if there’s no evidence, I’m trying it if it’s working for me’.”Ware wants to see more regulations around CBD products across the board. So people know what they’re getting. Then he would like quality observational studies on why people are using the product and what they get from it. And he wants frank conversations with active players about this.The biggest hurdle to progress in research here, he says, is the hard-wired notion of ‘the spirit of sport’.“They (governing bodies) don’t want elite athletes to be seen as cannabis users,” Ware says. “And so we’re right back at that stigma again. The pro athlete who’s using cannabis to recover is not a pothead, junkie or druggie. They are a highly-functioning, highly-qualified individual who’s trying to perform and has found a way to do that.“That conversation needs to happen in order for us to crack that stigma and stop looking at the ‘spirit of sport’, like somehow these athletes are lesser humans because they’re using. It’s okay for us to inject them with steroids and lidocaine and get them back on the field, but God forbid they should take a kind of gummy after a game. To me that’s the breaking point.”Decision makers: World Anti-Doping Agency (Getty Images)As of January 2021, WADA will have a new code, with a new approach to cannabis use.The new rule says that the period of ineligibility will be reduced to a flat three months for any athlete that can prove the substance was taken out of competition and was unrelated to sport performance. The athlete can then reduce the period of ineligibility down to one month if they satisfactorily complete a substance of abuse treatment programme, approved by the relevant anti-doping organisation.In addition, if an athlete can establish that in-competition use of the drug was unrelated to sport performance, then the violation will not be considered intentional, which means a two-year ban will be handed out.However, the approach to cannabis use around the world is evolving and WADA must be mindful of that. And as the number of known, naturally-occurring cannabinoids grows, and more companies look to develop products, WADA must be quick to react.Yet when asked if they would ever relax their approach for the sake of more research into pain relief, WADA’s science director Dr Olivier Rabin tells Rugby World: “Not so much, and there are good scientific reasons supporting the current approach.“There’s a wealth of research in the field. Several research institutes in the world, like the National Institute of Drug Abuse in the US, and many other organisations that look at this from a social or societal standpoint, rather than from the sport perspective.“So some evidence on substances we are dealing with are usually fairly well-known. It’s more a matter of what rules we want to implement, and how the science really applies to the particular field of anti-doping.“There are many sectors of research where, despite the limited resources we have, we are very active in. But with this one in particular, we think there is some good research out there and this is typically an area where we rely more on others’ research and apply the outcomes to a very, very specific question that relates to anti-doping.”Of course that doesn’t mean we cannot continue to change the conversation about how we face pain. TAGS: Investigation (All illustrations by Jamie Latchord) After our 2017 feature Playing Through The Pain, we return to the subject of chronic pain management in rugby. Now we ask: could there be new ways of approaching the issue? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The heart palpitations scared him when he was on tramadol. His sleep was broken and when he was in bed, he describes it more as a trance than sleep. He would grind his jaw for hours.Hard yards: Ed Williamson against Bristol, 2008 (Getty Images)“It’s pretty easy to fall off the wagon,” he says when asked about the hooks some medications can get into you.“But it’s not like what you see on TV. It’s not like heroin addicts. If I took a tramadol now, it would ease the pain in my shoulder. I’d feel a bit better and then at the end of the day it would come back.“The problem for me is that the pain is so intense that you don’t ever want to not have it (tramadol) in your system. Does that make sense?”It does, and it’s pretty scary.Williamson adds that he appreciates some will say ‘World’s smallest violin, mate,’ on this subject. He enjoyed his time in rugby, and it can offer a brilliant living to you, if you excel. But having to give up the game after a long career is stressful enough, without dealing with long-term pain.In his recent autobiography The Hurt, Dylan Hartley claims he missed 1,320 days through injury during a 15-year career. He gives many details on a mangled body. In his own book, James Haskell writes that he “had it relatively easy but I still wake up in pain every day, and can’t run anymore”. He also describes secretly injecting anti-inflammatories into his buttock before one International, just to get through the game.There are other anecdotes out there and they all vary. Not everyone turns to painkillers, either.Strong carry: Davey Wilson v New Zealand (Getty Images)“I think I’ve probably had a bad back since I was 18 years old and I’ve still got it now, to be fair,” 44-cap English tighthead Davey Wilson tells Rugby World. “I can’t really get rid of it. I’ve tried a few bits and bobs. But I go for a little walk now and I get the numb leg, the numb foot, stuff like that. A lot of pain down the leg.“It’s really annoying and it becomes the thing you are managing day to day. Some days you’re good, some days you’re walking the little lad to school and you have to sit down on the way back until you can feel your foot again.“It’s a brutal job rugby – you pay for it when you’re playing and you pay for it afterwards as well!”Read next: THE EFFECT OF CUMULATIVE INJURIES ON RETIRED PLAYERSWilson, 35, is studying to be a physiotherapist in the North-East now. He has always wanted to understand his body, his pain, he admits. But despite his continued issues he refuses to take painkillers today. Short-term distractions are not the answer for him.The ex-prop feels that after years of being catered for, some former players can be oblivious to the fine, free healthcare options available to them, they just have to learn to wait like the rest of us. However, he agrees with those who feel aftercare in rugby is something that really needs looking at.He says that in the last six or seven years, in his experience, team medics have been conscious of how they handle pain medication and done so admirably. It’s a point repeated by Adam Balding, former Leicester, Gloucester and Falcons back-row and current Birmingham Moseley DoR, who also tells us: “credit where credit’s due, I do you feel that welfare for players has improved dramatically over the years and should be recognised, I think it’s important that the voice of the players is being heard a lot more than it used to be.”But after 15 years of handing your body over to the game, Wilson says, there should be someone or some group to help guide retired pros looking to manage their chronic pain, to help them find the right help with the NHS while they juggle decisions on what’s next. Giving up can become suddenly isolating.He certainly had to think long and hard about his options – being an electrician or plumber, operating in tight spaces, was out of the question when he considered what would hurt the most.In August, NICE challenged the effectiveness of meds like paracetamol (Getty)Both Wilson and Williamson do agree, though, that players must take some personal responsibility when looking ahead. There is a balance to be had between your own planning and aftercare.Wilson believes in the power of exercise to help. Williamson talks of how looking after nutrition, stretching, rehab and prehab may have helped him more further down the line had he wired in sooner. He also knows of more than a few players who have no lingering issues with pain following retirement, and he believes those were the early adopters of the all-round approach.Williamson adds: “When it (cannabis) does eventually become legal – and I hope it does – I wouldn’t recommend a player smokes a couple of joints before a game. But maybe it’s worth looking into some edibles or stronger, high-potency CBD oils? Not around games but just to manage pain throughout the week.”Researchers already want to understand what is already legal, better. In August, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) said there was “little or no evidence” to say commonly used drugs for chronic primary pain – paracetamol, ketamine, corticosteroids, anaesthetic/corticosteroid combinations, or antipsychotics – made any difference to a subject’s quality of life, pain or psychological distress.Anyway, even further ahead of all of that, Williamson believes it would be beneficial to simply talk about alternative approaches to pain management. Even just as an exercise to get pros speaking to one another.He is not the only one.last_img read more

Garden Street Residence / Pavonetti Architecture

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first_imgShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/782575/garden-street-residence-pavonetti-architecture Clipboard Year:  Houses Projects Photographs:  Amanda KirkpatrickSave this picture!© Amanda Kirkpatrick”This small home in Austin, TX combines pure Modernism with a regional vernacular referencing aging structures such as barns and stables found throughout rural Texas. Cedar siding, exposed wood and steel framing, and steel windows imbibe the home with a hand wrought aesthetic, while trim-less details, large windows and clean unadorned lines pay respect to Modernism.Save this picture!© Amanda KirkpatrickThe handmade staircase at Garden Street was constructed onsite from plate steel, expanded metal and reclaimed long leaf pine. The steel frames for the windows were fabricated two miles from the construction site and powder coated in South Austin. Leftover steel was fabricated into pedestal sink tables and an entry table. The concrete slab was left bare for the lower floor and tongue and groove framing lumber serves as the decking and the finished floor for the upper level. The aesthetic strives to celebrate the elegance, efficiency, and oft hidden roughness of construction.Save this picture!© Amanda KirkpatrickSave this picture!Floor PlanThe interior design concentrated on adorning the space in the same simple and clean way that the space was designed. As such, a color pallet was chosen to be rich and deep and added elements would be minimal. Round leaf plants soften the spaces while books and trinkets on open shelving provide color with purpose.Save this picture!© Amanda KirkpatrickSave this picture!Floor PlanThe interior spaces are reminiscent of a industrial loft in New York, the exterior brings to mind the rustic structures of ranching the Texas Hill Country and the furnishing brings in color from around the world. Being the owner, architect and builder is a trying task but the rewards for the hard work are clear and results speak for themselves in this beautiful home in East Austin.”Save this picture!© Amanda KirkpatrickProject gallerySee allShow lessShigeru Ban Designs Retractable “Scale” Pen Inspired by Architect’s RulerArchitecture NewsBIAD’s Proposal for Shekou Sea World Culture and Arts CenterUnbuilt Project Share United States Save this picture!© Amanda Kirkpatrick+ 17 Share “COPY” Garden Street Residence / Pavonetti Architecture Garden Street Residence / Pavonetti ArchitectureSave this projectSaveGarden Street Residence / Pavonetti Architecturecenter_img Architects: Pavonetti Architecture Year Completion year of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/782575/garden-street-residence-pavonetti-architecture Clipboard 2014 ArchDaily Photographs CopyAbout this officePavonetti ArchitectureOfficeFollowProductsWoodSteel#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesAustinUnited StatesPublished on February 23, 2016Cite: “Garden Street Residence / Pavonetti Architecture” 23 Feb 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic BrassGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseLouvers / ShuttersTechnowoodSunshade SystemsFaucetsDornbrachtKitchen Fittings – EnoWoodSculptformTimber Tongue and Groove CladdingMembranesEffisusFaçade Fire Weatherproofing Solutions in Design District Project LondonHanging LampsLouis PoulsenPendant Lights – KeglenBlinds / Mosquito Nets / CurtainsBANDALUXPleated ShadesEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesFranken-SchotterFacade System –  LINEAWoodBlumer LehmannCNC Production for Wood ProjectsMaterials / Construction SystemsCaneplex DesignPoles – Tonkin BambooFibre Cement / ConcreteTegralFibre Cement Slate Roofing – Thrutone Endurance SmoothMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream “COPY” CopyHouses•Austin, United Stateslast_img read more

New website to match projects with wealthy philanthropists

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first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Advertisement In September the Reed Foundation will launch a website designed to help wealthy individuals keen to donate between £100,000 to £10 million find an appropriate charitable project.TheBigGive.org.uk will feature projects from a range of charities, and would-be donors will be able to search them by amount, geographic location, and type of organisation.The Reed Foundation is to contact the top 20,000 charities to inform them of the service offered by the site. Charities will not be charged to upload project details. The Foundation will also be contacting wealthy individuals and holding events for would-be donors.Alec Reed, founder of the Reed recruitment company, will put his money where his mouth is and donate £1 million via the site in its first year.A partnership with private banking firm Coutts & Co will also help the service reach key wealthy individuals.www.thebiggive.org.uk New website to match projects with wealthy philanthropists  35 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img Tagged with: Digital Major gift The Big Give Howard Lake | 18 July 2007 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Public thinks charities spend 40% on admin, says survey

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first_img Howard Lake | 23 October 2008 | News Public thinks charities spend 40% on admin, says survey  26 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy Nfpsynergy Research / statistics AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Research by nonprofit sector think-tank and research consultancy nfpSynergy has found that the British public believes that charities typically spend 35% on fundraising and 40% on administration.The figures emerged from nfpSynergy’s CharityAwareness Monitor which has tracked a representative sample of 1000 16+ year olds throughout mainland Britain for the past decade, uncovering donors’ attitudes and habits as well as what they think of charities’ fundraising strategies and tactics.The survey suggests that the public recognises the need for charities to invest in fundraising. The average ‘acceptable’ sum respondents felt charities should spend on fundraising was 23% of income, while just 11% should be spent on administration.Indeed, this public acceptance for expenditure on fundraising has grown over the last year. In July 2007 34% agreed that “it makes sense for charities to spend more of my donations on fundraising this year, if it will increase their income for future years”, but in July 2008 this had risen to 41%.Joe Saxton, nfpSynergy’s Driver of Ideas, said: “The public appear to significantly overestimate what charities spend on their fundraising and their admin costs, and show especially low tolerance towards the latter. This should prompt charities to better explain the true level of, and the rationale for, all of their costs”.He encouraged charities to refer to ‘admin’ as ‘necessary management’, indicating that this was no wasteful burden, but rather an essential lubricant without which the very wheels of charity would not turn.”www.nfpsynergy.netlast_img read more

New consulting service to offer inspiration to fundraising staff

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first_img Howard Lake | 23 May 2014 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The Inspiration Bureau is a new consulting agency set up to help charities and organisations inspire and re-inspire their supporters, major donors, volunteers and staff.Founded by Andy Whyte, formerly of European fundraising agency Clayton Burnett and the RNLI, the company specialises in vision, message creation, major appeal development, personal presentation and event techniques.Whyte said:“We are all in the business of inspiring others with the vision of our cause, but we also need help from time to time to focus on getting the message across in the most effective way possible. The Inspiration Bureau has one clear and exciting aim, to help people inform and inspire others”.Andy Whyte at the Clayton Burnett Annual Lectures 2013While Campaign Manager at RNLI, Whyte led the £10 million ‘Train one, save many’ campaign which reached target 2 years early.He confirmed that he will continue to work in partnership with Clayton Burnett. For example, he will again be hosting their Annual Lectures event in December. Advertisement Tagged with: Consulting & Agencies  45 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis New consulting service to offer inspiration to fundraising stafflast_img read more

Net Farm Income Forecast Shows 2018 Decline

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first_img Previous articleCrop Insurance Sets Acreage Record in 2017Next articleUSDA February WASDE Report NAFB News Service The Department of Agriculture predicts net farm income will decline 8.3 percent in 2018, dropping $5.4 billion to $59.5 billion. Meanwhile, USDA’s Economic Research Service suggests that net cash farm income is forecast to decline $6.7 billion, or 6.8 percent, to an inflation-adjusted figure of $91.9 billion. USDA says the forecast declines are the result of changes in cash receipts and production expenses. If realized, 2018 net farm income would be the lowest since 2002 and net cash farm income would be at its lowest level since 2009. Both profitability measures remain below their 2000-2016 averages, which included substantial increases in crop and animal/, and animal product cash receipts from 2010 to 2013.Net cash farm income includes cash receipts from farming as well as farm-related income, including government payments, minus cash expenses. Net farm income is a more comprehensive measure of profits that incorporates noncash items, including changes in inventories, economic depreciation and gross imputed rental income.Source: NAFB News Service Home Indiana Agriculture News Net Farm Income Forecast Shows 2018 Decline SHARE Facebook Twitter By NAFB News Service – Feb 9, 2018 Net Farm Income Forecast Shows 2018 Decline Facebook Twitter SHARElast_img read more

University of Limerick goes Wilde about Oscar

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first_imgLifestyleArtsNewsLocal NewsUniversity of Limerick goes Wilde about OscarBy Editor – June 10, 2013 938 Oscar Wilde photographed around the time of his visit to Limerick in 1884A UNIVERSITY of Limerick symposium commemorated Oscar Wilde’s 1884 visit to Limerick when he appeared before an audience in the old Theatre Royal on Henry Street.The event, co-organised by Dr Tina O’Toole and Dr Eoin Devereux (UL) and Dr Kathryn Laing (Mary Immaculate College), focused primarily on Wilde as a public intellectual and cultural critic.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up ‘The Importance of Being Wilde’ symposium attracted Wilde experts from all over the world and featured a wide range of papers on Wilde’s contribution to literature, politics and culture.Dr Devereux commented: ”Wilde was a literary writer, radical thinker, tragic hero, wit and cultural icon all at once. The University of Limerick Symposium aims to contextualize Wilde’s work in relation to other scholars, literary writers, radical ideas, and avant-garde movements of his day.”On January 8 1884 Oscar Wilde appeared at the old Theatre Royal to deliver a lecture entitled ‘On the House Beautiful’.According to reports at the time, the event was not well attended and featured a small, select audience.Wilde appeared onstage again the following night to deliver a talk on ‘Personal Impressions of America’. Proceedures and appointments cancelled again at UHL Facebook Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April Twitter Shannondoc operating but only by appointment Linkedin Email RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img First Irish death from Coronavirus Previous articleMore UPC jobs for LimerickNext articleBillboard backlash Editor Surgeries and clinic cancellations extended No vaccines in Limerick yet TAGSEoin Devereauxfeaturedfull-imageLimerick visitOscar WildeTheatre RoyalUL Advertisement WhatsApp Printlast_img read more

Survey: Misconceptions Holding Back Homebuying

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first_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago While nearly seven in 10 Americans agree that now is a good time to become a homeowner, a large number remain reluctant due to their own misguided understanding of the financing process, according to survey results released Monday.In a poll of more than 2,000 consumers, Wells Fargo found 68 percent feel that now is a good time to buy a home, and 95 percent want to own if they don’t already.The results jibe with Fannie Mae’s latest consumer housing survey, in which 64 percent of Americans said now is a good time to buy (matching the survey’s record low).”Although the homebuying process has changed in many ways in recent years ,our survey found Americans still view homeownership as an achievement to be proud of and many believe that now is a good time to buy a home,” said Franklin Codel, head of Wells Fargo Home Mortgage Production.On the other hand, while nearly three-quarters of respondents in Wells Fargo’s survey said they “know and understand” the financial process involved in buying a home, large numbers also expressed doubt or misguided notions about homebuying requirements. For example, Wells Fargo reported, 30 percent of respondents expressed belief that only people with high incomes can obtain a mortgage at this point, and 64 percent said they believe only those with a “very good”” credit score can buy a home right now.While 64 percent of respondents said they have an understanding about how much of a down payment is needed to purchase a home, nearly half said 20 percent is required. Forty-four percent also said they know little or nothing about closing costs.While most lenders report that lending requirements at the moment are still high as a result of enhanced regulations and reluctance to take risks, Codel says lenders would be well served to work on educating homebuyers about all programs available to them—especially the millennial crowd, most of which pointed to lack of down payment funds as one of their biggest hurdles to homeownership.”It is important for prospective homebuyers to feel empowered to ask lenders and real estate agents questions about available options, such as down payment assistance or FHA [Federal Housing Administration] or VA [Veterans Affairs] loans for veterans,” he said. “Informing prospective homebuyers about their options is the first step toward helping them realize their goals.”On the other hand, the survey also found most Americans are confident in managing their personal finances, with 82 percent saying they know how to save, invest, and work within a budget. In addition, 63 percent said they have a “rainy day fund,” including more than half of millennial-aged respondents.With so many Americans focused on keeping their financial houses in order, Codel says there’s a decent opportunity to turn those consumers into responsible homeowners with an educational push.”[W]e have an opportunity as lenders, nonprofit agencies and real estate agents to better inform Americans about credit ratings, mortgage costs and housing affordability,” he said. “This would help demystify the homebuying experience for many consumers.” Survey: Misconceptions Holding Back Homebuying Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: DS News Webcast: Tuesday 9/16/2014 Next: Homeownership Still Holds Promise for Nine in 10 Americans Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Share Save The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Related Articles Demand Fannie Mae Financing First-Time Homebuyers Home Ownership Wells Fargo 2014-09-16 Tory Barringer Tory Barringer began his journalism career in early 2011, working as a writer for the University of Texas at Arlington’s student newspaper before joining the DS News team in 2012. In addition to contributing to DSNews.com, he is also the online editor for DS News’ sister publication, MReport, which focuses on mortgage banking news. Tagged with: Demand Fannie Mae Financing First-Time Homebuyers Home Ownership Wells Fargo in Daily Dose, Featured, Headlines, Market Studies, Newscenter_img Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago About Author: Tory Barringer September 16, 2014 1,770 Views  Print This Post Home / Daily Dose / Survey: Misconceptions Holding Back Homebuying Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Subscribe Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days agolast_img read more

TMP/Hudson Global Resources Award for Innovation in Recruitment and Retention

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first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Thisaward recognises effective approaches to selection, recruitment and retentionof employees. The judge looked for successful examples of developing andmotivating staff and for innovative ways of attracting the right applicants tothe organisation. Relevant to this category were new methods of recruiting,measuring and assessing capability and performance, career management,succession planning and competency testing. The judge looked for evidence oforganisations gaining competitive advantage from their strategies.CategoryjudgeJanetRubin runs her own HR consultancy and has sought to bring fresh ideas toclients such as the Hays Group, the Association of British Insurers, AbbeyNational, Coutts/NatWest, Harrods, Anglian Water, the DTI, the Home Office andthe Lord Chancellor’s Department.  Shefrequently acts as an interim HR director and her consultancy work specialisesin diversity issues and change management. She is passionate about theimportance of finding new ways to meet the needs of internal and externalcustomers, but also stresses how important it is to ground any changes firmlyin an organisation’s culture.HertfordshireCounty Council TheteamNo.in HR team 12, with 200 working in personnel across the councilStaff responsible for 25,000AlanWarner, People & property directorDavid Beatty, Executive member, resources committeePaula Mayes, Recruitment centre managerMandy Trenchard, Head of business support, corporate servicesRichard Timms, Assistant personnel officer, adult care servicesVicky Alvedo, Personnel manager, community informationCarole Grimwood, Assistant director, county personnelVerity Oatham, Assistant personnel assistant, environmentElaine Hart, Personnel manager, county supplies and contract servicesMary Lowten, Personnel manager, recruitment and informationDenise Porter, Personnel officer, recruitmentBecky Brown Senior personnel officer, children, schools and familiesCountyPersonnelAboutthe companyHertfordshireCounty Council (HCC) is the biggest employer in Hertfordshire with 25,000staff, and aims to provide the best possible local services at the lowest costto the taxpayerThechallengeTobe the first public sector body to fully outsource its entire recruitmentresourcing to a contractor, leaving the council to concentrate on providingcommunity servicesWhatthe company didCreateda recruitment centre, delivered in partnership with Manpower plc, whichprovides a fully integrated recruitment service, from advertising and theprovision of temporary staff to the management and administration of permanentrecruitment and redeploymentBenefitsand Improvements–Major savings, projected to be £3m by year five–24/7 service for temporary staff–Better response to recruitment campaigns–Improved quality of temps–E-recruitment is in place via a state-of-the-art website–Growing candidate databaseJanetRubin says: “A well-presented entry that scored well across allcriteria. It is the first fully outsourced recruitment solution in the publicsector. The visual material was very good and effectively sold the benefits ofworking for the  county council and thecounty. This initiative has shown demonstrable organisational benefits for thecounty council.”SurreyPartnersTheteamNo.in HR team 5, with a total of 7 in HRStaff responsible for All staff across 20 public sector bodies and one privatesector body, JobsgopublicDavidThomas, Head of personnel, Runnymede BCDavid Clooke, Head of personnel, Mole Valley DC,Jan Hunt, Head of HR, Borough of Spelthorne Council, Janet Melbourne, Director of personnel, Guildford College, Andy Gardiner, Head of law, Runnymede BC Trevor Lines, Technology project managerSteve Batley, Project manager and steering group chairmanRichard Tyrie & David Marshal, Joint managing directors of JobsgopublicSurreyPartners e-Recruitment Pathfinder ProjectAboutthe companySurreyPartners e-Recruitment Pathfinder Project (SPeRPP) is a group of 20 publicsector organisations and one private sector partnerThechallengeTopool the resources, needs and aspirations of a disparate group of public sectoremployers in Surrey; to deliver major efficiencies in recruitment processes; torealise significant cost savings and improved staff retentionWhatthe company didCreateda shared web-based recruiting system and ‘live’ talent pool. SPeRPP provideslive access to all partner job vacancies (10,000 a year) via a once-onlyapplication process that allows multiple job applications whenever the site isvisited. Through the electronic talent pool, partners can positively managesuccession planning and retention, as well as plan work placements, careerdevelopment, job sharing and training needsBenefitsand Improvements–‘Pathfinder’ status for the project granted by the Strategic PartneringTaskforce, established by the office of the deputy prime minister inrecognition of the innovative partnership. Of all pathfinder initiatives, thisone is unique in actually being operational–A reduction in average job application times–Will generate significant cost savings over the next three years–Releases HR staff from menial administrative tasks and allows them to focus onmore effective HR strategiesJanetRubin says: “SPeRPP is a unique project designed to pool theresources, needs and aspirations of a disparate group of public sectoremployers in Surrey, to deliver major efficiencies in recruitment processes,significant cost savings and improved retention. It scored well under all ofthe criteria and is due to produce significant benefits to the partners.”NorthCumbria Mental Health and Learning Disabilities NHS TrustTheteamNo.in HR safety team 5, with a total of 7 in HRStaff responsible for 3,200ShirleyChipperfield, Director of shared HR and training servicesPhillippa Hardy, Senior HR officerSuzanne Hussain & Sharon Moon, Recruitment and retentionco-ordinatorsDinal George, Administrative supportSharedHR and TrainingAboutthe companyTheNorth Cumbria Mental Health and Learning Disabilities NHS Trust provides themajority of statutory mental health services across North Cumbria. It employs atotal of 3,200 staffThechallengeTocombat shortages of available staff in a 2,000 square mile catchment area whichlargely consists of a static, rural populationWhatthe company didCreated‘Stepping Stones’, a 10-week evening programme to allow prospective employeesto have a taste of an NHS career without giving up their current employment oraltering their daily life. The aim was to allow an informed decision abouttheir future career and therefore make it more likely the trust would retainthem as employees if they decided to take up the opportunityBenefitsand ImprovementsSteppingStones has provided the trust with a continual supply of homegrown healthcareassistants for the future from the local community. These recruits have anawareness and knowledge of the mental health and learning disabilities servicesprior to entering the organisation. So far, 95 people have applied to thescheme and 20 have ‘graduated’ from the course. A number of those are lookingto commence nursing training in the next yearJanetRubin says: “With these extra individuals, the organisation has beenable to cover gaps within the rota system and alleviate the pressures onexisting staff. This has aided motivation throughout the organisation.  This entry scored well on all criteria andexcellent material was supplied with the entry.” TMP/Hudson Global Resources Award for Innovation in Recruitment and RetentionOn 18 Nov 2003 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more