Category Archives: vboaqhynzdmp

A collection of knowledge

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first_imgSince 1672, Harvard University has been acquiring scientific instruments for teaching and research. In 1948, the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments was established to preserve the objects as a resource for teaching and research in the history of science and technology. It has since grown to more than 20,000 objects making it one of the three largest university collections of its kind in the world. Originally associated with the Harvard Library system, the collection was placed under the stewardship of the Department of History of Science in 1987. Whether it’s the handmade globe electrical machine (circa 1750) Harvard President Edward Holyoke created using recycled materials to perform experiments with Professor John Winthrop or the camera obscura given to the College by Benjamin Franklin, these astonishing collections never cease to amaze.last_img read more

Israeli troops kill Palestinian attack suspect in West Bank

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first_imgJERUSALEM (AP) — Israel’s military says troops have killed a Palestinian suspected of trying to attack soldiers at a West Bank intersection. In a video released by the army, a female soldier says the attacker approached her with a knife and jumped on top of her. She says she managed to fend him off, and her commander then shot him. The Palestinian Health Ministry identified the suspect as a 17-year-old resident of a nearby Palestinian village. No soldiers were wounded in Tuesday’s incident. Israel has seen a series of shootings, stabbings and car-ramming attacks in recent years, mostly carried out by lone attackers with no apparent links to armed groups.last_img read more

‘Science of Food’

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first_imgEstablish partnerships that link public school science teachers and NSF graduate teaching fellows (GTFs) to improve science teaching.Create a community where teachers serve as expert resources to GTFs and UGA faculty on instruction-related issues.Use the community to identify science concepts that students find hard to grasp or inaccessible.Bring science-related resources centered on these concepts to public schools in forms easy for teachers to use. These would include student-run experiments, Weekend Discovery kits that students take home, research facility tours, ask-a-scientist questions-and-answers through videoconferencing, up-to-date news items and other related activities customized to the needs of individual teachers.Provide a Web-based linkage to experts, activities, curriculum alignment, lessons and reference information. By Faith PeppersUniversity of GeorgiaWith Georgia public schools struggling to meet the global demand for science education, the University of Georgia has secured a $1.4 million National Science Foundation grant to create “The Science Behind Our Food” for classroom teachers.”Much has been written in recent years about the status of science teaching in U.S. public schools,” said David Knauft, associate dean for instruction for the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “That’s the basis for this program.”Results from the 2000 National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education showed that when asked about their qualifications to teach plant biology, only 46 percent of teachers reported they were very well qualified. Even fewer reported being very well qualified to teach environmental and resource issues.”When asked about recent course work in the sciences, only 22 percent of middle school teachers and 37 percent of high school teachers reported having taken a course in the previous three years,” Knauft said.TSBOF goal”Our goal in ‘The Science Behind Our Food’ is to address these findings directly through a collaborative effort of the CAES and UGA’s College of Education,” Knauft said. “The project will provide resources and training for middle and high school science teachers to provide inquiry-based instruction for their students.” State-of-the-art support”This program gives teachers access to state-of-the art information and resources,” said Steve Oliver, associate professor of science education and one of four co-principal investigators. “Teachers need up-to-date information. And if you haven’t had a biology course recently, things have changed. There’s no way anybody can keep up with biology.”Oliver said the program also aims to change what people think of the CAES. “A lot of people think of a plow,” Oliver said. “But state-of-the-art science being done in the CAES is just as high-level … as what’s being done anyplace. “They have people sequencing the genome of the peanut. They’ve got the first cloned cow (from a carcass),” he said. “We’ve got a high level of research in a lot of those areas going on. So we want to change people’s opinion about that.”Starts with fellowsThe program will be started through GTFs’ work with public school science teachers as liaisons, technologists, resource providers and co-teachers. A startup summer institute, with teachers, GTFs and UGA faculty members, will develop programs to assess the science learning objectives that are hardest for students to master or for teachers to get across with available resources.Teachers and GTFs will create real-world demonstrations and experiments to provide teachers more knowledge and students real-world activities related to the hard-to-learn concepts. The activities will draw on research in nutrition, biochemistry, genetics, engineering, biology, physiology and other disciplines within the CAES.”We also want to inform people about the science that’s involved in food,” Oliver said. “We titled this ‘The Science Behind Our Food’ because we can use food-related examples to teach biology.””It’s an important educational issue,” he said. “Kids don’t know where meat comes from. A lot of school children have no idea of the link between the cows and hamburgers. That’s a link we need to make. People need to know that.”center_img The researchers also hope to:last_img read more

Applicants needed for bar examiners

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first_imgApplicants needed for bar examiners April 1, 2006 Regular News A pplicants needed for bar examiner s Florida Board of Bar Examiners Vacancy : Lawyer applicants are being sought to fill two vacancies on the Florida Board of Bar Examiners. The Board of Governors will be selecting six nominees for two lawyer vacancies at its June 2 meeting. The nominations will then be forwarded to the Supreme Court to fill the five-year terms commencing November 1. Attorney members must have been a member of The Florida Bar for at least five years. They must be practicing lawyers with scholarly attainments and have an affirmative interest in legal education and requirements for admission to the Bar. Appointment or election to the bench at any level of the court system will disqualify any applicant. Law professors or trustees are ineligible. Board members of the bar examiners must be able to attend approximately 10 meetings a year in various Florida locations. Members volunteer 300 or more hours per year on board business depending on committee assignments. Actual travel expenses connected with the meetings and examinations are reimbursed. Persons interested in applying may download the application from www.floridabar.org, or should contact The Florida Bar at 850/561-5600, ext. 5757, to obtain the proper application form. Applications may also be obtained by writing the Executive Director, The Florida Bar, 651 East Jefferson Street, Tallahassee, 32399-2300. Completed applications must be received no later than the close of business April 7. Resumes will not be accepted in lieu of the required application. The Board of Governors will review all applications and may request telephone or personal interviews.last_img read more

Does NY’s cybersecurity regulation apply to your credit union?

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first_img continue reading » With the recent ransomware attack demonstrating how vulnerable the world is to cyberattacks, I spent part of my weekend looking back over NY’s regulations and to whom they apply to. These regulations took effect in March, but there is a six month transition period, with some requirements being phased in over the next year.What follows is one man’s opinion and not a substitute for consultation with your own counsel and compliance team.NY’s regulations apply to “any person operating under or required to operate under a license, registration, charter, certificate, permit, accreditation or similar authorization under the Banking Law, the Insurance Law or the Financial Services Law.” This definition clearly applies to state chartered credit unions and CUSO incorporated or licensed in New York State, such as a mortgage banking or title insurance business.What if you have a federally chartered credit union that makes mortgage loans? Here is where people part ways with my analysis. Even though originators working for banks and credit unions are exempt from state licensing requirements under Section 12C of the banking law, they still must be registered with NYS as loan originators. (N.Y. Banking Law § 599-c(3)(a) (McKinney). On its face the regulation is broad enough to be triggered by this requirement. 21SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Fed bank president: ‘Proceed with caution’ on rate hikes

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first_img Kansas City Federal Reserve President Esther George, and a voting member on the Federal Reserve Open Market Committee (FOMC) this year, said the monetary-policy setting committee “should proceed with caution” as it considers future rate hikes.Following its December meeting, the committee moved forward with its fourth rate hike of 2018, raising the federal funds target rate by a quarter-point to a range of 2.25 to 2.5 percent. The committee also pared its projection for 2019 rate hikes from three to two. It is set to meet next Jan. 29-30.“A pause in the normalization process would give us time to assess if the economy is responding as expected with a slowing of growth to a pace that is sustainable over the longer run,” George said while speaking at the Central Exchange Tuesday. “Failure to recognize these lags [in monetary policy] could lead to an overtightening of policy, a downturn in economic growth and an undershooting of our inflation objective.” ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The Federal Reservecenter_img continue reading »last_img read more

PRO-6 raises almost P8M COVID fund

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first_imgPolice personnel across WesternVisayas contributed to the fund, according to Police Lieutenant Colonel JoemMalong, PRO-6 information officer. If the PNP can raise P200million, every family-beneficiary is projected to receive between P5,000 toP8,000. Malong said the collection will beuntil April 30 and the gathered money will be forwarded to the NationalTreasury. “This fund-raising program is voluntary. Depende sa aton mga pulis kun pila ila mahatag. We are happy kay daku natipon naton. Bilogamon sweldo subing nga bulan, wala sang buhin so we have reason togive bigger,” said Malong. The Bayanihan Fund Challenge aimsto raise over P200 million from individual voluntary contributions of PNPpersonnel in response to President Rodrigo Duterte’s candid admissionof the government’s extreme difficulty in providing the basic needs of thepoorest of the poor during this coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.center_img ILOILO City – The Police RegionalOffice 6 (PRO-6) has raised P7,926,312 million for the Philippine NationalPolice’s (PNP’s) Bayanihan Fund Challenge, a fund-raising drive that wouldbenefit poor families economically displaced by the ongoing enhanced communityquarantine. The PRO-6 has its own version of thisfund-raising drive. “We are hoping that by the end of thismonth we can raise over P10 million. Our regional director, Police BrigadierGeneral Rene Pamuspusan, is very thankful to the men and women of PRO-6 forsharing their extra money even if they, too, are affected by the enhancedcommunity quarantine,” Malong added./PNlast_img read more

Duterte instructs public: ‘Wear, reuse face mask to stop COVID-19 spread’

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first_imgMANILA – President Rodrigo Duterte lectured the public on the importance of wearing face masks to prevent the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the country. Duterte also said that violations of the mandatory wearing of face masks in public places and the observance of physical distancing can be considered a “serious crime” given that the country is seeing an outbreak of infections. “Maski gamitin mo siguro ‘yan ng dalawang beses okay man, kung isprayhan mo ng alcohol pagtapos, wag ‘yun iniispray mo tapos suot agad,” President Duterte said in an address to the public on Tuesday. “We have to ask our police to be more strict, hulihin talaga. A little shame would put them on notice forever,” Duterte said. “Sino ba naman gustong mahuli ka? But if you are brought to the police station and detained there, that would give you a lesson for all time.” Based on the latest data from the Department of Health, there were reported 1,521 new confirmed cases of the COVID-19 in the country, bringing the country’s total to 68,898./PN The WHO added that medical masks should be discarded immediately after use and preferably thrown in a closed bin. Duterte’s statement run counter with the World Health Organization, which has said before that only non-medical fabric masks can be reused but these should be washed with water and detergent. Duterte, in a taped address aired Tuesday morning, claimed masks can be used for up to two times as long as these are sprayed with a disinfectant.last_img read more

Gordon L. Ramsey

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first_imgGordon Lee Ramsey was born on September 27, 1927 in Ross, Ohio to the Late Robert Lee Ramsey and Bernadine Alma Hebauf Ramsey Tolley. He went to and graduated from Ross High School. While growing up he worked for a few farmers, a feed mill and drove a Co-op fuel truck. While at the feed mill he made deliveries to the customers and he told us stories of how the feed came in cloth bags with print on them. The women would pick out which pattern they wanted their feed in because they would use the cloth feed bags to make curtains and clothes for their families. He enjoyed talking with the customers.Gordon was drafted and served 21 months in the Army during the Korean War. Gordon worked at P & G for 26 years before retiring. After retiring he worked a few odd jobs. He also got involved with the Ohio County 4-H Fair Board, Farm Bureau and the Soil & Water Conservation for the south east Indiana area.Gordon was born and raised on a farm then moved to Cincinnati when he met his loving wife of 41 years, Betty Lou Geisdorf.  In this union they were blessed with three children; Debra Leigh, Gordon Dale and Mark Homer. After 13 years of living in the city his dream of living in the country on a farm became a reality. He moved his family to a 60 acre farm in Rising Sun, Indiana in 1970. He had a few cows and chickens, raised hay and a little corn and tobacco. The tobacco was a new learning experience for him. Betty and the kids really enjoyed the country life.Gordon was preceded in death by his parents and step mother, Ruth Ramsey, son, Mark, his wife, Betty Lou and by a son-in-law, Justin Wayne Ray, Sr.He is survived by his daughter, Debra Ray of Bennington, IN, by son, G. Dale Ramsey (Cheryl), of Rising Sun, IN., by grandchildren, Justina Ray of Bennington, IN and Justin Ray, Jr. of Rising Sun, IN, brother, Eugene Ramsey (Mildred) of Oxford, OH, sister, Norma Cox of Hamilton, Ohio, sister-in-law, Martha Lawson of Cincinnati, OH and by many nieces, nephews, cousins and many dear friends and neighbors.Funeral services will be 11 AM, Thursday, March 3rd at Markland Funeral Home in Rising Sun, IN. Friends are invited to call Wednesday 5-8 PM at Markland Funeral Home. Burial will be at Arlington Cemetery in Cincinnati, OH. Memorial donations may be made to charity of donor’s choice. marklandfuneralhome.comlast_img read more

Indiana Electors vote for Trump-Pence

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first_imgINDIANAPOLIS, Ind. — Monday, all of Indiana’s electors cast their Electoral College Vote for President-elect Donald Trump and Vice President-elect Mike Pence.The ceremony was held in the Indiana House of Representatives Chamber.There were protests going on outside the chamber to convince the electors to vote for anybody else besides Trump.In the history of Indiana casting Electoral votes, there has never been a “faithless elector,” an elector who does not vote for the General Election winner.last_img read more