Blue Bulls end winless streak against Cheetahs

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first_imgBorder Bulldogs (15) – Tries: Matthew Taljaard, Onke Dumase; Conversion: Byron McGuigan; Pens: McGuigan. Valke (43) – Tries: Coert Cronje, Warren Perkins, Chris Ehlers, Kyle Hendricks, Willie Odendaal, Reg Muller, Marco Kotze; Conversions: Hendricks (4). Bulls: Rossouw De Klerk (L), Gary Botha (C) and Dean Greyling (R)The Vodacom Blue Bulls ended their winless run in the 2011 Vodacom Cup after they recorded their first victory of the competition at Shimla Park following their 45-21 victory over the Toyota Free State Cheetahs on Friday night.The defending champions conceded defeats against the DHL Western Province (32-29), Pampas XV (27-22), Boland Cavaliers (20-17) and the Sharks XV (30-19) earlier this season. However the Pretoria team bounced back to winning ways and were impressive against the Free Staters by running in seven tries en-route to their first win of the campaign.Captain Juandre Kruger, Clayton Blommetjies, Gerrit-Jan van Velze, Marnus Schoeman, Corne Fourie, Stefan Watermeyer and William Small-Smith were the try-scorers for the visitors. Flyhalf Marnitz Boshoff kicked two conversions while Watermeyer converted three five-pointers.Former SA Under-20 prop Marcel van der Merwe and Robert van Schalkwyk were the try-scorers for the Toyota Free State Cheetahs. Flyhalf Louis Strydom kicked two penalties and a drop goal while former DHL Western Province centre Morgan Newman added a conversion for the Bloemfontein team.DHL Western Province flyhalf Gary van Aswegen converted a try by flanker Wimpie van der Walt which was scored in the final minute of the match against GWK Griquas to ensure that the Cape team maintained their undefeated record this season following their 23-22 victory at Newlands on Saturday.The Kimberley team, thanks to their bonus point achieved in their match against DHL WP for losing within seven, ensured that they ended round five in joint first position on the North Section log with the Ford Pumas who defeated the Boland Cavaliers 26-17 in Wellington on Saturday. The GWK Griquas’ superior points’ differential over the Witbank team resulted in them occupying first position at the conclusion of round five.The Golden Lions consigned the Eastern Province Kings to their first defeat of the 2011 Vodacom Cup after they secured an 11-10 victory at the Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium. Both teams scored one try with the Johannesburg team’s five-pointer being scored by Dusty Noble and the hosts’ try by Clint Newland. Jaco van Schalkwyk kicked a penalty and converted Newland’s try. However the difference between the two teams proved ultimately to be as a result of the kicking boot of flyhalf Burton Francis who kicked two penalties for the visitors.The Sharks returned to winning ways in emphatic style in Empangeni on Saturday following their comprehensive 63-7 victory over the Tasol Solar Griffons. The Durban team were full of running and scored nine tries against their Welkom opponents.Ross Cronje, Kobus de Kock, Riaan Swanepoel, Mark Richards, Daniel Adongo, Marcell Coetzee, Jerome Pretorius, Piet Lindeque and Rosco Specman were the Sharks XV players were scored five-pointers while flyhalf Guy Cronje kicked nine conversions. Werner Griesel was the sole try-scorer for the Tasol Solar Griffons. His try was converted by Tiaan van Wyk.Meanwhile the Pampas XV moved in to pole position on the South Section log following their 38-20 victory over the Platinum Leopards in Potchefstroom on Saturday while the Valke notched up their first win in this season’s competition following their 43-15 win over the Border Bulldogs. PRETORIA, SOUTH AFRICA – MARCH 26: Dean Greyling (R) and Bulls team-mates during the Vodacom Super Rugby match between Vodacom Bulls and Lions at Loftus Versfeld Stadium on March 26, 2011 in Pretoria, South Africa.. (Photo by Dominic Barnardt/Gallo Images/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS In the other Vodacom Cup match of the weekend, the SWD Eagles consigned the Welwitschias to their fifth defeat of the competition following their 34-27 victory at the Outeniqua Park Stadium in George on Friday evening.Scores for the round…Vodacom Blue Bulls (45) Tries: Juandre Kruger, Clayton Blommetjies, Gerrit-Jan van Velze, Marnus Schoeman, Corne Fourie, Stefan Watermeyer, William Small-Smith; Conversions: Marnitz Boshoff (2), Watermeyer (3) Toyota Free State Cheetahs (21)– Tries: Robert van Schalkwyk, Marcel van der Merwe; Conversions: Morgan Newman; Pens: Louis Strydom (2); Drop goal: Strydom.DHL Western Province (23) – Tries: Johann Sadie, Wimpie van der Walt; Conversions: Gary van Aswegen (2); Pens: Van Aswegen (3). GWK Griquas (22) – Tries: Richard Lawson, Wesley Wilkens, Leon Karemaker; Conversions: Earl Rose (2); Pens: Rose.Pampas XV (38) – Tries: Agustin Gosio (2), Juan Imhoff, Mariano Galarza, Tomas Cubelli; Conversions: Santiago Gonzalez Iglesias; Pens: Iglesias. Platinum Leopards (20) – Tries: Christo van Niekerk, Johannes Seerane, Joubert Engelbrecht; Conversion: Clayton Durand; Pens: Durand.EP Kings (10) – Try: Clint Newland; Conversion: Jaco van Schalkwyk; Pens: Van Schalkwyk. Golden Lions (11) – Try: Dusty Noble; Pens: Burton Francis (2).Sharks XV (63) – Tries: Ross Cronje, Kobus de Kock, Riaan Swanepoel, Mark Richards, Daniel Adongo, Marcell Coetzee, Jerome Pretorius, Piet Lindeque, Rosco Specman; Conversions: Guy Cronje (9). Tasol Solar Griffons (7) – Try: Werner Griesel; Conversion: Tiaan van Wyk.Boland Cavaliers (17) – Tries: Jonathan Francke, Rossouw Kruger; Conversions: Willie le Roux (2); Pens: Le Roux. Ford Pumas (26) – Tries: Rudi Mathee, JW Jonker, Penalty try; Conversion: Coenie van Wyk; Pens: Van Wyk (3).SWD Eagles (34) – Tries: Clint Wagman, Dean Hopp, Howard Noble, Henk Eksteen, Brood van der Westhuizen, Deroy Rhoode; Conversions: Ambrose Barends (2). Welwitschias (27) – Tries: Sergio de la Harpe, PJ van Lill, Vaughan Pietersen, Chrysander Botha; Conversions: Botha (2); Penalties: Botha.last_img read more

HSBC Sevens World Series: England ready to rock in Wellington

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first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS South Africa’s clinical efficiency was evident in their home tournament. In the quarter-final, Wales controlled the ball for almost the whole of the first half but one loose offload, one breakdown error, one injured player and bang, the Blitzbok led 19-0 (it finished 33-0). World Series top six after two legs1. South Africa 41 points2. England 393. Fiji 324. = Scotland, New Zealand 276. Wales 25Wales, however, have been encouraged by their efforts. Cardiff Blues’ James Botham, grandson of cricket legend Ian, and the Dragons’ Elliot Frewen come into a squad that is punching above its weight, according to coach Gareth Williams.“We’ve very much set ourselves long-term goals,” he said, “but to start the way we did with semi- and quarter-final finishes in Dubai and Cape Town was way ahead of expectations when you consider how young this group is.”While Wales sit a creditable sixth in the table, Scotland are faring even better – they are level with New Zealand on 27 points.Gavin Lowe is recalled having missed Cape Town through injury while GB silver medallist Mark Robertson will compete in his 50th World Series tournament. Edinburgh’s Glenn Bryce is included for the first time this season and Nyle Godsmark also returns following impressive performances in the BT Premiership with Melrose.Celtic class: Scotland finished sixth and fourth in the first two tournaments (Pic: Gallo Images/Getty)Scotland have been drawn as top seeds in Pool D and coach Calum MacRae said: “We take a lot of confidence from how we’ve opened the series. However, our feet remain firmly on the ground.”Elsewhere, Collins Injera, the all-time record try-scorer in the series with 235, returns to the Kenya team after being dropped because of a pay dispute with his union. Australia refresh their squad after a glut of injuries that include Ed Jenkins (shoulder), Jesse Parahi (jaw), John Porch (ankle), Tom Lucas (knee) and long-term absentee Lewis Holland (Achilles).And Fiji, the reigning series and Olympic champions now under new coach Gareth Baber, bring in five of the Fijian Barbarians team that won the recent Sudamerica Rugby Sevens Series in South America.Finally, it’s welcome back Sir Gordon Tietjens, who belatedly takes charge of Samoa after the NZRU somewhat pettily prevented him starting the series with his new team because of contractual small print.Change of hat: Gordon Tietjens, here speaking to media in Auckland last July, now coaches Samoa“It’s a big challenge being back in Wellington and I feel really energised for it,” said Tietjens, who over 22 years led New Zealand to 12 series titles, four Commonwealth Games gold medals and two Sevens World Cup crowns.“If (Samoa) make shifts in two areas, in nutrition and fitness, they will certainly cut it in the game. They know how to play the game. Bringing them to New Zealand, we’ve been here for three weeks, is to learn all about what high performance is.“In Samoa they understand the game, the physicality of it is never questioned, but it’s the speed and intensity of the game that they have got to get used to, to compete in the World Series.”New Zealand sevens great Eric Rush has this week questioned the validity of Wellington as a host venue because of falling spectator numbers, but the interest will be sky-high when the Kiwis play their first game – Tietjens and Samoa are the opposition. No northern hemisphere team has won the global sevens competition, but Simon Amor’s men are riding high as they go into this weekend’s third leg of the series Gold bar: England celebrate on their way to victory in Cape Town last month (Pic: Gallo Images) It’s early days but England have made the brightest of starts in their bid to win the HSBC Sevens World Series for the first time. After winning bronze in Dubai and gold in Cape Town, Simon Amor’s team now tackle the third leg in Wellington, where they have an eight-year track record of top-four finishes.“We have traditionally done well in this tournament and have good momentum from December,” said coach Amor. “But everyone understands there are big improvements that we must make in certain areas. The rest of the world will also have learned a lot from Dubai and Cape Town, so we need to keep taking steps forward and be increasingly smarter with our decision-making and how we play the game.”England, who sit second in the table, two points behind South Africa, have named an unchanged squad that includes eight of the GB squad that bagged silver in the Rio Olympics. Dan Norton is joint top try-scorer for the series with 15.Razor sharp: Dan Norton scores against Argentina, one of his 15 tries in the series (AFP/Getty)Amor added: “There is only a short turnaround between the remaining tournaments and jet-lag becomes a significant factor at this stage in the season. We’ve had the last block where there was a chance to go hard on fitness, so it was great to see so many of the guys getting personal bests in their scores over the Christmas period.“Those foundations are now in place, not just for the upcoming tournaments but hopefully to carry us through the series.”Former New Zealand Sevens captain Karl Te Nana, now a media commentator on the circuit, sees England as a force to be reckoned with.“Their balance between using their big men to good effect and their playmakers is what makes them dangerous. You have Dan Bibby and Tom Mitchell pulling the strings in the backs and then the new-found confidence of Dan Norton, which creates a very strong team across the park.“When it all clicks it’s devastating and very hard to defend against. I’m not surprised with their results in the first two rounds and the experience gained by the Team Great Britain players at Rio is something the side is benefiting from.”New Zealand may prove the biggest obstacle this weekend. England beat them 26-12 in Dubai but lost 33-7 to them in Cape Town after yellow cards to Dan Bibby and James Rodwell.Right moves: New Zealand do the haka last year after winning their third successive Wellington titleThe Kiwis, under Scott Waldrom and Tomasi Cama’s management for the season until Clark Laidlaw takes the reins on 1 June, are chasing their fourth successive Wellington triumph and they have won nine of the 18 titles there.They include four new caps following the recent National Sevens but an experienced core remains, with Scott Curry the captain and DJ Forbes preparing for his 82nd World Series tournament.South Africa have injuries to contend with. Kyle Brown ruptured his ACL in Cape Town that has ended his season while Cecil Afrika damaged a knee in training, so Zain Davids, a junior Springbok star in 2016, and speedster Siviwe Soyizwapi deputise.“We have lost over 100 tournaments’ worth of experience with Kyle and Cecil out of action,” said coach Neil Powell.An emotional driver for the series leaders will be the desire to give Seabelo Senatla the send-off he deserves. The World Rugby Sevens Player of the Year missed the 19-17 final defeat to England with a quadriceps muscle injury but is fit to play in his final two World Series tournaments – Sydney follows next weekend – before leaving for Super Rugby. He is joining the Stormers.Blitzbok legend: Seabelo Senatla has two tournaments to play before heading to Super Rugby (Pic: Gallo Images/Getty)A thrilling sight on the series for so many years, the Blitzbok flyer is chasing the all-time South Africa try-scoring record. He has 172, seven behind Fabian Juries.“The record is in the back of my mind,” Senatla admitted, “but I’m not stressing about it.” Wellington Sevens poolsPool A: England, Kenya, Argentina, PNG.Pool B: South Africa, Fiji, Australia, Japan.Pool C: New Zealand, USA, France, Samoa.Pool D: Scotland, Wales, Russia, Canada.* TV coverage of the Wellington Sevens starts from 9.50pm GMT on Friday 27 January on Sky Sports 2.last_img read more

Who will win the rugby prize at the Cross Sports Book Awards?

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first_img2008 Ripley’s World – Andy Ripley (Mainstream)2009 Seeing Red: Twelve Tumultuous Years in Welsh Rugby – Alun Carter and Nick Bishop (Mainstream)2010 Confessions of a Rugby Mercenary – John Daniell (Ebury Press)2011 The Grudge – Tom English (Yellow Jersey)2012 Higgy – Alastair Hignell (Bloomsbury)2013 The Final Whistle: The Great War in Fifteen Players – Stephen Cooper (The History Press)2014 City Centre – Simon Halliday2015 Beyond The Horizon – Richard Parks (Sphere)2016 No Borders: Playing Rugby for Ireland – Tom English (Arena Sport)O’Connell, whose book The Battle, ghosted by Alan English, reflects the intensity and drive for perfection he brought to elite rugby over most of this century, is going for a double because he is also shortlisted in the International Autobiography category.He will face opposition from Barcelona superstar Andrés Iniesta, boxing legend Roberto Duran, South African cricketer AB de Villiers, long-distance swimmer Diana Nyad and the creator of Nike, Phil Knight.Damon Hill, Ian Wright, Greg Rutherford, Jo Pavey, Joey Barton and Jonathan Trott are the stars in contention for the Cross Autobiography of the Year award.Prize guy: former England centre Simon Halliday won the rugby award in 2014 (Getty Images)The awards will be presented by Sky Sports News presenter Mike Wedderburn and Test Match Special’s Alison Mitchell.After the category winners have been announced on 24 May, each winner will be promoted in a media and retail campaign, with an online public vote determining the overall Cross Sports Book of the Year.Everyone that enters the public vote at sportsbookawards.com will be entered into a prize draw to win National Book Tokens. In the running: Irish legend Paul O’Connell at a book signing to promote his autobiography (Inpho) There’s a distinct Irish flavour to the rugby shortlist for the Cross Sports Book Awards, which take place at Lord’s cricket ground on Wednesday evening.The powerful autobiographies of former Ireland and Lions locks Paul O’Connell and Donal Lenihan both make a six-strong list that also includes Gerry Thornley’s riveting account of Connacht’s Guinness Pro12 triumph this time last year.The awards are in their 15th year and have grown in both magnitude and status, with categories added and Sky’s TV cameras now on hand to capture the key moments for a highlights programme.Sponsors have been keen to associate with an event that celebrates outstanding sports writing and book publishing. Bankers Arbuthnot Latham support the Rugby Book of the Year award that was won last year by a long-time Rugby World writer Tom English, for his compelling No Borders: Playing Rugby for Ireland.An accomplished New Zealand stable-mate, Behind the Silver Fern, makes this year’s shortlist, as does a beautifully crafted history of Harlequins to mark their 150th anniversary, penned by Brendan Gallagher.Proud heritage: Harlequins’ 150th anniversary prompted a splendid history book (Getty Images)Completing the rugby list is the autobiography of one of the first superstars of rugby union, Welshman Terry Davies, whose book sheds light on postwar rugby in both hemispheres and is a treat.“Terry is a natural storyteller,” says co-writer Geraint Thomas. “His book is packed with humour. He typifies the Welsh humour once so prevalent amongst the working class.“His tale is both a social commentary and cultural account of Welsh life pre and post war as well as a priceless account of a bygone age of rugby union.”The book is presented in memory of Terry’s brother Len, who was capped for Wales before Terry but died in his 20s of leukaemia.The 1959 Lions side that represented the high point of Terry Davies’s career (Hulton Archive/Getty)Whoever picks up the gong will become the tenth rugby winner. The late Andy Ripley was a popular first recipient of the rugby award in 2008, with his diary detailing his fight against prostate cancer, and the poignancy of his acceptance speech has not been surpassed. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: ConnachtHarlequins center_img There is no second-guessing the judging panel, which comprises five seasoned rugby journalists. Tom English’s The Grudge, about the 1990 Scotland-England Grand Slam shootout, and Alastair Hignell’s autobiography Higgy triumphed in successive years against books that arguably carried the favourite’s tag.Brian Moore’s Beware of the Dog and Matt Hampson’s Engage had to be content with taking the Best Autobiography prize.The Rugby Book of the Year winners This year’s nominees for Arbuthnot Latham Rugby Book of the Year are:Behind the Silver Fern: Playing rugby for New Zealand. By Tony Johnson & Lynn McConnell (Polaris)My Life in Rugby by Donal Lenihan (Transworld Ireland)Front Up, Rise Up: The Official Story of Connacht Rugby. By Gerry Thornley (Transworld Ireland)Nunquam Dormio: 150 Years of Harlequins. By Brendan Gallagher (Vision Sports Publishing)The Battle. By Paul O’Connell (Penguin Ireland)Terry Davies: Wales’s First Superstar Full-back. By Terry Davies (Y Llofa)For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. There are three Irish titles among the six-strong rugby shortlist at the 2017 Cross Sports Book Awards. Rugby World takes a closer look at the contenders…last_img read more

Benetton v Zebre live stream: How to watch from anywhere

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first_imgTeam news and TV details for this Italian derby Muddy affair: Benetton and Zebre will be hoping for better conditions on Friday (Getty Images) Benetton v Zebre live stream: How to watch from South AfricaSuperSport came on board as a Pro14 broadcast partner when South African franchises Cheetahs and Kings joined the competition in 2017.They primarily show matches involving those teams but are also showing Benetton v Zebre kicks off at 8pm on SuperSport 1.There are various DStv packages available that give access to SuperSport, ranging from EasyView, with access to Blitz, to Premium, which includes all ten sports channels.We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing.  Benetton v Zebre live stream: How to watch the Pro14 match online from anywhereThe Guinness Pro14 returns on Friday night, with an Italian derby to kick off the abbreviated format that will be used to complete the 2019-20 season.When the two sides met over the Christmas period, Benetton did the double over Zebre – winning 13-8 away and 36-25 at home – but form is hard to judge ahead of this clash.Neither side can make the Pro14 semi-finals, but pride is at stake in this derby. With a host of Italy internationals playing in both teams, there should be quality match-ups across the pitch.Benetton: Jayden Hayward; Luca Sperandio, Joaquin Riera, Luca Morisi, Leonardo Sarto; Paolo Garbisi, Dewaldt Duvenage; Ivan Nemer, Tomas Baravalle, Filippo Alongi, Alessandro Zanni, Federico Ruzza, Alberto Sgarbi (captain), Michele Lamaro, Braam Steyn.Replacements: Gianmarco Lucchesi, Cherif Traore, Simone Ferrari, Marco Lazzaroni, Manuel Zuliani, Charly Trussardi, Ian Keatley, Marco Zanon.Zebre: Michelangelo Biondelli; Mattia Bellini, Giulio Bisegni (captain), Tommaso Boni, Jamie Elliott; Carlo Canna, Marcello Violi; Daniele Rimpelli, Luca Bigi, Eduardo Bello, David Sisi, Leonard Krumov, Maxime Mbanda, Johan Meyer, Giovanni Licata.Replacements: Massimo Ceciliani, Danilo Fischetti, Giosue Zilocchi, Cristian Stoian, Jimmy Tuivati, Guglielmo Palazzani, Antonio Rizzi, Federico Mori.Here’s how to find a reliable live stream for Benetton v Zebre wherever you are.How to watch Benetton v Zebre from outside your countryIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local Pro14 coverage, like Benetton v Zebre, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Pro14 live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free – perfect timing to watch the end of the Pro14 season – or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPN Benetton v Zebre live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIf you want to tune in to Benetton v Zebre from New Zealand, the match kicks off at 6am on Saturday morning on Sky Sport NZ 3.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 30 September 2020 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offer See Premier Sports offersIf you’re from the UK but are overseas when there’s a particular match you want to watch, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.Benetton v Zebre live stream: How to watch from IrelandIn Ireland, eir Sport show every Pro14 match live, including Benetton v Zebre, and if you sign up for eir broadband you can watch eir Sport for free via the eir TV app and online player.Find out more about the eir broadband deals here.Or you can sign up for eir TV and broadband packages, which include eir Sport, from €39.98 a month.If you have Sky TV in Ireland but not eir broadband, you can add eir Sport to your package for €19.99 a month for three months (€29.99 after that) or for €240 for the year – here are the detail of the Sky-eir package.Benetton v Zebre live stream: How to watch from EuropeIf you’re in Austria, Germany, Italy or Switzerland, you can watch Benetton v Zebre (kick-off 8pm) through the live and on-demand streaming service DAZN, which is compatible with smart TVs and phones, tablets, PCs, streaming sticks, set-top boxes, gaming consoles and more.Benetton v Zebre live stream: How to watch from the CanadaDAZN, which allows you to live stream sport or watch it on demand, is the place to go to watch Benetton v Zebre in Canada. It will kick off at 2pm EST and 11am on the West Coast.Find out more about DAZN here LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Benetton v Zebre live stream: How to watch from the UKBenetton v Zebre, which kicks off at 7pm on Friday, will be shown live on Premier Sports 1 in the UK.Premier Sports show every Guinness Pro14 match live in the UK. If you have a Sky or Virgin Media contract, you can add Premier Sports to your package from £9.99 a month.Or subscribe to Premier Player so you can stream matches online from £9.99 a month or £99 for 12 months, which would include the 2020-21 Pro14 season too. That is due to start on 3 October.last_img read more

Chronic Pain, Cannabis and Rugby

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first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. IN 2019, former Newcastle, Yorkshire and London Welsh back-row Ed Williamson told Martha Kelner of Sky News all about his troubles with opioid addiction as a player.Today, he lives in France and throws himself into art. He has had a catalogue of surgeries, and while he still has an emergency box of ‘odds and sods’ painkillers left over from so many scrapes with the scalpel, he has tried other methods of gaining relief.“I was always really tight and around the time around my neck operation last year, in the nine months leading up to that I couldn’t turn my neck to the left, past a couple of degrees,” he says. “My traps were ridiculously tense.“I smoked a bit of weed and over the next hour they eased off just enough for me to relax, breath a little bit. It was enough just to be a little bit less tense in my neck and my head.“It might have been just a nice, temporary release of the tensions and pain that I had. Which I would have got with the painkillers. But then the problem I had with the painkillers was also getting a lot of residual effects.” “THERE’S THIS sort of idea that in sport, chronic pain doesn’t exist,” says Richmond Stace, physiotherapist turned pain coach.“It exists everywhere in every level of society, it just has different terms. Sports medicine teams are fantastic at dealing with acute injuries and pitchside scenarios, but the model is just not the right one for dealing with ongoing problems or recurring problems or chronic pain.”Stace, who worked with England Women in the early 2000s, says that he became disillusioned with “patching people up” as a physio. The idea is that we all buy into the notion that pain must be related to an injury in that specific location where it hurts, and focusing treatment on that one area will fix the problem.With chronic pain, he says, there needs to be more.“The first thing that needs to happen is to create some time and some space to really talk to a player,” Stace says. “But of course it also then depends on the player’s view because they’ve been brought up in this culture – a lot of players will still be thinking that the pain is very much related to something in their knee or their back.“It takes a brave person to think, ‘well actually, my emotional state plays a huge role in this pain. My expectations, my dreams, my hopes play a huge role’. When it comes to research, there are lots of studies being done on all of these things, so what we’re talking about here might sound different or ‘alternative’, but with research on pain and these dimensions on it, there’s a lot out there.”“Break the stigma”: Ardie Savea’s personalised gum boots (Getty Images)He jokes that things would not get so deep so early with athletes – you need to build up to the big issues. Stace does also say that with acute injury, current accepted practice and painkiller use in the first instance is important. But he is not alone in wanting to step away from the traditional approach when it comes to the chronic.Physiotherapist and lecturer Mike Stewart (alongside Dr Ware) helped put together the International Olympic Committee’s IOC consensus statement on pain management in elite athletes paper that came out in 2017. He is also fascinated with the language we use. For example, he has found that in some situations, in sport or in the military, discussions around injury and pain can include insult and punishment for the perceived ‘weakness’.It is also a very Western approach, he says, to be bombarded with talk of a healthcare scare followed by a fix. There is a sense of the restitutional about it. We all want a silver bullet to instantly take the pain away.Yet in the absence of this, he says, we see certain approaches to treating pain repeat over and over: when you go beyond the acute, it’s painkillers as the small troops. Then if pain lingers, send in the tanks of physio treatment and injections. Lingering still? The nuclear option is surgery.For him, seeing youngsters with laundry lists of surgeries is tantamount to medical negligence.Read next: IS IT TIME TO RETHINK STRENGTH & CONDITIONING IN RUGBY?Stewart believes that looking at acceptance commitment therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy and mindfulness is a good place to start (Harlequins, for example, use a mindfulness coach). And we need to consider the language we use. As he explains: “Studies here in the UK have found that 99% of the undergraduate hours that clinicians spend training for is based in pathology, biomechanics, anatomy. So that leaves less than 1% of the hours that these people spend in training for psychology, communication skills, looking at how to build resilience and self-efficacy. Which is crucial in sport.All too familiar?: A treatment table (Getty Images)“Look at somebody who keeps getting recurring injuries and then they feel like their bodies are falling apart and they essentially don’t have the skills to deal with these really complex, challenging problems. Which are (hard) enough outside of a sporting environment but put them into sport and it sort of magnifies.”Think of the stresses a young star faces. Pressure to perform, to earn, to win, and then you interact with the world around you and, gasp, have you had a look at social media, mate? Perhaps it does magnify. And yet, in some spaces, at the highest level, are we divorcing physical trauma with mental trauma and vice versa?Dr Darren Britton is a sports psychologist and lecturer at Solent University. “Psychology now is being integrated a lot better at every single level of organisations, be it with clubs or national governing bodies or whatever. So rather than psychology operating in these little silos, it’s being integrated into every aspect of the organisation,” he says.“It still has a long way to go. I would say there’s still a lot of inconsistency. Some sports organisations do psychology really, really well. There are others who still are years behind in how they integrate psychology and psychologists into what they do.“Some will still operate with the same old approach of weaving psychologists in one day a week to have a chat with this person or that person. Rather than seeing it as something that actually needs to be integrated into everything that goes on within the organisation.“For years the stereotype was of a psychologist being a fixer, a firefighter. If you’ve got a problem you go to the sports psychologist, rather than sports psychology being seen as proactive.”Financial peril: Rugby faces tough times (Getty Images)The fear is that in dire financial times, this aspect is the easiest to cut. You may just bring in your fixer less and less.In the first instance, Dr Britton believes pro clubs should work with figures with certain qualifications as standard – from the British Psychological Society or British Association of Sports and Exercise Sciences – and registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), rather than, say, the popular public speaker.He says that increased stress levels can increase the risk of injury, with increased muscle tension, the effect on concentration and missing cues, the impact on sleep and other mechanisms. So prepare to address that. Stewart would like to see sports medics actively updating their understanding of chronic pain and whole non-medical staff (like coaches and others) buying into that too.The idea of the ‘holistic’ may make you wince. But as we consider how far understanding of certain medications is still to come, and if we accept that exceptional sports medics continually seek to improve, would it be better for more to now embrace the psychological side and address how we talk about pain as well?Perhaps it is just the right small step. For now. PAIN WILL forever be a part of collision sport. We accept this now. But at some point, in another part of the world, some ask about the cost.“We’ve done a lot of work and engaged with our former athletes and you almost have a direct correlation between (long-term) painkiller usage and things like depression and issues with mental health,” says George Atallah, of the NFL Players Association. “There is no doubt about that. And I think once we found a direct correlation between those things, that’s what triggered us to look at ways to prevent.“You can clearly load up on a bunch of painkillers and play, or you might have to take them to get out of bed after you’ve had a collision. But what is the impact on your long-term mental health (if you do it repeatedly)?“It is still a concern; it’s not fixed yet.”The above is about American Football, not rugby, and looks more at long-term opioid use well beyond acute injury – in this part of the world we may be more familiar with opioids like codeine or tramadol which are not recommended for long-term, chronic pain management.But there are a few reasons why we start there. Bear with us.Facing the pain: The risks facing NFL stars are well documented (Getty Images)In 2017, Rugby World took a long look at the culture of painkiller use in our Playing Through The Pain feature. In the years since, the topic has washed in and out of public discourse. We have heard some former rugby internationals detail their broken histories of injuries and their relationships with pills and pain. They want to talk about their futures too.So three years on, we had to come back to the topic. Not because of any sense of things worsening or to raise panic but to take a different view.If we accept that pain is a given, that team medics should have players’ best interests at heart and that brave athletes must make peace with the aches of oncoming years, could we approach chronic pain management differently?Which can mean looking at other sports, other treatments, other mindsets. And being wary of what athletes in rugby and other comparable competitions are exploring to alleviate their pain.That brings us back to the NFL and quickly on to the discussion about using cannabis-based products.The US sport does not adhere to the World Anti-Doping Agency’s code, while rugby does, but chat of weed is spreading. In March, a collective bargaining agreement for the NFL was reached that relaxed their rules on testing for cannabis.Atallah, assistant executive director of external affairs, explains that in late 2017, the NFLPA set up a committee to look at cannabis but also opioid use, as part of a “wide-ranging look at pain management”. He says they also looked at training methodology, recovery methodology, nutrition. Then in January 2018, cannabidiol (CBD, a product that can be produced without the psychoactive compound tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the part of cannabis that creates the ‘high’), was removed from WADA’s banned list, and it became possible for rugby players to use CBD products, including CBD oil.Talking point: CBD products are focus of a national discussion (Getty)The NFLPA formed their own task force, Atallah says, because so many people around their sport had competing interests. Politics is never far away, particularly with the issue of legalisation and varied approaches to cannabis across states and nations. But he adds, “We certainly talk to other sports and sports unions (about this issue). I think what I’m primarily trying to convey is that the athletes are the ones who are advocating to protect themselves. And the leagues don’t really push the envelope on this issue in a comprehensive way.“I think we (collision sports) should all be learning from each other, yes.”Again, the laws on what substances are prohibited in rugby and Football are very different, but in this instance it is being recommended that dialogues stretch across sports.Glenn Healy, a former National Hockey League goaltender and current NHL Alumni Association president, would appreciate that.“If someone’s got a better mousetrap than I do, please share it with me,” he says.“We want to make tomorrow better than today for a whole bunch of players and making tomorrow better might mean something like more sleep, less anxiety, less depression, more functional integration with your world.“I’m just looking for where I don’t have to come up with the answer to this question: ‘How did we get here with this player?’ How did it get to this?“So your rugby player that was probably revered around the world, how do we get there with him? I don’t want to have another call from a wife or a kid saying, ‘I want my husband back’ or ‘I want my dad back’, because things are not going the way they should be going.”Exploring new avenues: The physical NHL (Getty Images)Healy says that when it was announced that the NHLAA would partner with the Canopy Growth cannabis company in Canada, to look for alternative treatments, he expected a backlash from some disgusted members. But he claims all he heard were thanks “for going to the corners on this”.This is another point where rugby players may be interested. Because the use of CBD is a hot topic in the sport. In August, researchers at Liverpool John Moores University found that more than 25% of 517 union and league players surveyed use or have used CBD oil (despite warnings not to – but more on that in our companion piece).It is spoken about as a godsend. Yet as Dr Mark Ware, chief medical officer at Canopy Growth, says: “Unfortunately for CBD in particular there is nothing (by way of extensive research) on human pain and CBD. It’s astonishing that we don’t have data on that.Read next: THE PROBLEMS WITH CBD OIL EXPLAINED“With THC: different story. There’s way more information on neuropathic pain, spasticity, nausea, anxiety – there’s a ton of stuff. Some of it’s small and it’s not super strong but at least there’s data, there are trials that suggest THC is a pretty good analgesic in chronic pain management.“But with CBD the jury’s still out.”It’s perhaps not what some will want to hear. But in a sea of anecdotes, the scientists will want more. And it’s understandable why.Information about the risks of CBD use are out there – as with the Liverpool John Moores report. But the same study highlights that professional athletes are seeking out the products.Ware describes this as being athlete-driven, adding that something similar is being observed in clinics, with chronic pain sufferers who “will use and say ‘I don’t care if there’s no evidence, I’m trying it if it’s working for me’.”Ware wants to see more regulations around CBD products across the board. So people know what they’re getting. Then he would like quality observational studies on why people are using the product and what they get from it. And he wants frank conversations with active players about this.The biggest hurdle to progress in research here, he says, is the hard-wired notion of ‘the spirit of sport’.“They (governing bodies) don’t want elite athletes to be seen as cannabis users,” Ware says. “And so we’re right back at that stigma again. The pro athlete who’s using cannabis to recover is not a pothead, junkie or druggie. They are a highly-functioning, highly-qualified individual who’s trying to perform and has found a way to do that.“That conversation needs to happen in order for us to crack that stigma and stop looking at the ‘spirit of sport’, like somehow these athletes are lesser humans because they’re using. It’s okay for us to inject them with steroids and lidocaine and get them back on the field, but God forbid they should take a kind of gummy after a game. To me that’s the breaking point.”Decision makers: World Anti-Doping Agency (Getty Images)As of January 2021, WADA will have a new code, with a new approach to cannabis use.The new rule says that the period of ineligibility will be reduced to a flat three months for any athlete that can prove the substance was taken out of competition and was unrelated to sport performance. The athlete can then reduce the period of ineligibility down to one month if they satisfactorily complete a substance of abuse treatment programme, approved by the relevant anti-doping organisation.In addition, if an athlete can establish that in-competition use of the drug was unrelated to sport performance, then the violation will not be considered intentional, which means a two-year ban will be handed out.However, the approach to cannabis use around the world is evolving and WADA must be mindful of that. And as the number of known, naturally-occurring cannabinoids grows, and more companies look to develop products, WADA must be quick to react.Yet when asked if they would ever relax their approach for the sake of more research into pain relief, WADA’s science director Dr Olivier Rabin tells Rugby World: “Not so much, and there are good scientific reasons supporting the current approach.“There’s a wealth of research in the field. Several research institutes in the world, like the National Institute of Drug Abuse in the US, and many other organisations that look at this from a social or societal standpoint, rather than from the sport perspective.“So some evidence on substances we are dealing with are usually fairly well-known. It’s more a matter of what rules we want to implement, and how the science really applies to the particular field of anti-doping.“There are many sectors of research where, despite the limited resources we have, we are very active in. But with this one in particular, we think there is some good research out there and this is typically an area where we rely more on others’ research and apply the outcomes to a very, very specific question that relates to anti-doping.”Of course that doesn’t mean we cannot continue to change the conversation about how we face pain. TAGS: Investigation (All illustrations by Jamie Latchord) After our 2017 feature Playing Through The Pain, we return to the subject of chronic pain management in rugby. Now we ask: could there be new ways of approaching the issue? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The heart palpitations scared him when he was on tramadol. His sleep was broken and when he was in bed, he describes it more as a trance than sleep. He would grind his jaw for hours.Hard yards: Ed Williamson against Bristol, 2008 (Getty Images)“It’s pretty easy to fall off the wagon,” he says when asked about the hooks some medications can get into you.“But it’s not like what you see on TV. It’s not like heroin addicts. If I took a tramadol now, it would ease the pain in my shoulder. I’d feel a bit better and then at the end of the day it would come back.“The problem for me is that the pain is so intense that you don’t ever want to not have it (tramadol) in your system. Does that make sense?”It does, and it’s pretty scary.Williamson adds that he appreciates some will say ‘World’s smallest violin, mate,’ on this subject. He enjoyed his time in rugby, and it can offer a brilliant living to you, if you excel. But having to give up the game after a long career is stressful enough, without dealing with long-term pain.In his recent autobiography The Hurt, Dylan Hartley claims he missed 1,320 days through injury during a 15-year career. He gives many details on a mangled body. In his own book, James Haskell writes that he “had it relatively easy but I still wake up in pain every day, and can’t run anymore”. He also describes secretly injecting anti-inflammatories into his buttock before one International, just to get through the game.There are other anecdotes out there and they all vary. Not everyone turns to painkillers, either.Strong carry: Davey Wilson v New Zealand (Getty Images)“I think I’ve probably had a bad back since I was 18 years old and I’ve still got it now, to be fair,” 44-cap English tighthead Davey Wilson tells Rugby World. “I can’t really get rid of it. I’ve tried a few bits and bobs. But I go for a little walk now and I get the numb leg, the numb foot, stuff like that. A lot of pain down the leg.“It’s really annoying and it becomes the thing you are managing day to day. Some days you’re good, some days you’re walking the little lad to school and you have to sit down on the way back until you can feel your foot again.“It’s a brutal job rugby – you pay for it when you’re playing and you pay for it afterwards as well!”Read next: THE EFFECT OF CUMULATIVE INJURIES ON RETIRED PLAYERSWilson, 35, is studying to be a physiotherapist in the North-East now. He has always wanted to understand his body, his pain, he admits. But despite his continued issues he refuses to take painkillers today. Short-term distractions are not the answer for him.The ex-prop feels that after years of being catered for, some former players can be oblivious to the fine, free healthcare options available to them, they just have to learn to wait like the rest of us. However, he agrees with those who feel aftercare in rugby is something that really needs looking at.He says that in the last six or seven years, in his experience, team medics have been conscious of how they handle pain medication and done so admirably. It’s a point repeated by Adam Balding, former Leicester, Gloucester and Falcons back-row and current Birmingham Moseley DoR, who also tells us: “credit where credit’s due, I do you feel that welfare for players has improved dramatically over the years and should be recognised, I think it’s important that the voice of the players is being heard a lot more than it used to be.”But after 15 years of handing your body over to the game, Wilson says, there should be someone or some group to help guide retired pros looking to manage their chronic pain, to help them find the right help with the NHS while they juggle decisions on what’s next. Giving up can become suddenly isolating.He certainly had to think long and hard about his options – being an electrician or plumber, operating in tight spaces, was out of the question when he considered what would hurt the most.In August, NICE challenged the effectiveness of meds like paracetamol (Getty)Both Wilson and Williamson do agree, though, that players must take some personal responsibility when looking ahead. There is a balance to be had between your own planning and aftercare.Wilson believes in the power of exercise to help. Williamson talks of how looking after nutrition, stretching, rehab and prehab may have helped him more further down the line had he wired in sooner. He also knows of more than a few players who have no lingering issues with pain following retirement, and he believes those were the early adopters of the all-round approach.Williamson adds: “When it (cannabis) does eventually become legal – and I hope it does – I wouldn’t recommend a player smokes a couple of joints before a game. But maybe it’s worth looking into some edibles or stronger, high-potency CBD oils? Not around games but just to manage pain throughout the week.”Researchers already want to understand what is already legal, better. In August, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) said there was “little or no evidence” to say commonly used drugs for chronic primary pain – paracetamol, ketamine, corticosteroids, anaesthetic/corticosteroid combinations, or antipsychotics – made any difference to a subject’s quality of life, pain or psychological distress.Anyway, even further ahead of all of that, Williamson believes it would be beneficial to simply talk about alternative approaches to pain management. Even just as an exercise to get pros speaking to one another.He is not the only one.last_img read more

England win Women’s Six Nations 2020 – with a game to spare

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first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Scotland’s draw with France is a hugely significant result for a team that hasn’t won a game in the championship since 2018.France led 13-3 early in the second half but were reduced to 14 players for the final quarter when Lenaig Corson suffered an injury after all their replacements had been used.The Scots came back strongly in that second period to level the scores with a Rachel Shankland try in the 72nd minute that was converted by Helen Nelson.In the other game of the weekend, Ireland beat Italy 21-7 in Dublin, with tries from Lindsay Peat and Claire Molloy as well as a penalty try, to make it three straight home wins in 2020.This weekend Italy play England, Scotland travel to Wales and Ireland will host France in a change of venue. Red Roses will aim to make it a Grand Slam by beating Italy on Sunday LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img England win Women’s Six Nations 2020 – with a game to spareEngland have been crowned Women’s Six Nations champions for 2020.The championship resumed over the weekend and while the Red Roses didn’t play, results in other fixtures mean they now have an unassailable lead at the top of the table.France’s 13-13 draw with Scotland at Scotstoun means England will lift the trophy no matter what happens in their final match against Italy on Sunday, although they are overwhelming favourites to beat the Italians to secure back-to-back Grand Slams.They scored 165 points and conceded only 20 in their four matches in this year’s Six Nations before the pandemic disrupted the tournament, and were odds-on to win the title after overcoming France in the opening round.Prep work: The Red Roses in training before their final Six Nations game (Getty Images)This is a record 16th Six Nations title for England and they now head to Parma this weekend looking for another clean sweep.England head coach Simon Middleton said: “We are delighted to have retained the title after four big performances from the team to date.“It’s a fitting reward for all the hard work put in earlier this year. We have a big week ahead and the aim is to stay focussed on securing the Grand Slam in Italy next weekend.” Sweet 16: England have won a record 16th Six Nations title (Getty Images) last_img read more

Biarritz take on Grindr as inclusivity sponsor

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first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS According to the company, Grindr is the world’s largest social networking app for gay, bi, trans, and queer people to connect. Since its launch in 2009, the company claim that their app serves more than 13M people in over 200 countries.In a statement, they said: “Grindr is excited to partner with JB Aldige and the Biarritz Olympique Pays Basque Rugby Club. The club has been outspoken against homophobia and has committed to Grindr to continue its work to increase inclusivity and acceptance in the league and rugby overall.“Grindr for Equality is an ever-evolving mission to help LGBTQ people around the globe. Our wide-ranging initiatives impact communities large and small on issues that matter to them the most: safety, sexual health, advocacy, and more.” Biarritz take on Grindr as inclusivity sponsorIn the latest move in their recent campaign against homophobia and discrimination, famed French club Biarritz Olympique have signed on for a shirt-sponsor deal with Grindr, the dating app for “gay, queer and trans people.”Biarritz, who are currently chasing promotion from ProD2 into the Top 14, revealed the partnership with the US-based company via social media. The deal is being reported as one of the most lucrative of its kind in the French game. The dating app is the club’s new shirt sponsor Earlier in May, Biarritz shared a message on its social media channels on behalf of France’s National Rugby League (LNR) for an end to LGBTQ+ discrimination.“Today and every day, the LNR is calling for the end of discrimination against LGBTQ+ people, a cause we hold close to our heart. We will continue to carry the universal values of rugby, which are equality, respect and solidarity.” Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Biarritz show off their new sponsored kit (pic courtesy of Biarritz) last_img read more

Andrew Wright named associate rector Trinity, Fort Worth

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first_img Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Andrew Wright named associate rector Trinity, Fort Worth Families, children and young adults Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Posted Jun 6, 2013 June 7, 2013 at 4:40 pm Congratulations! They’re lucky to have Father Andrew and his family! The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Comments are closed. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY center_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY People AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY [Trinity Episcopal Church] The Rev. Andrew Wright has been called to serve as the new Associate Rector for Families, Children and Young Adults at Trinity Episcopal Church, Fort Worth, Texas.Father Andrew was raised in the Episcopal Church, growing up in the North Panhandle town of Borger, Texas. He met his wife, Melanie, while a student at TCU and was part of Trinity’s own campus ministry throughout college.Shortly after college and their wedding, the Wrights moved to Sewanee, Tenn., for Andrew to begin his seminary studies. He graduated with a Master of Divinity from Sewanee in 1995 and was ordained by Bishop Sam Hulsey on June 4th that year. Andrew has since worked in Tennessee, Nebraska, New York, New Jersey, Maryland, and, home at last, in Texas, serving parishes along the way as Assistant, Rector, Priest-in-charge, and most currently as Rector of Saint Anne Episcopal Church in DeSoto, Texas.Andrew received a Master of Sacred Theology degree in 2003 from the General Theological Seminary and a Doctor of Theology degree in Liturgical Theology in 2012 from General as well. His wife, Melanie, is also an Episcopal priest, ordained in 2006, and serves St. Alban’s Episcopal Church in Arlington as priest-in-charge.The Wrights have three children, Aidan (19 at UTA), Benjamin (17), and Macrina (13). Aside from youth, children, family, and campus ministry, Andrew has an abiding interest in theater, science, and storytelling in all its forms.Father Andrew’s first day in the Trinity Church office will be Tuesday, July 9. His first Sunday at Trinity will be July 14. Cathy Sniderman says: Comments (1) Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC last_img read more

Returning SC priest reinstated through new path for reconciliation

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first_imgReturning SC priest reinstated through new path for reconciliation Scott Elliott says: South Carolina Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT October 1, 2014 at 12:09 am Many years ago– in the days of Prayer Book revision– my wife met a woman who was railing against the then-proposed Book. The woman decried what had been omitted, and what had been included. My wife informed her that she was not correct on either side of the equation. The woman said that her priest had told her about the omissions and inclusions, and in response to a question she said that she had never wasted her time by even looking at the Book. My wife freely gave her a copy of the Proposed Prayer Book to take home and review. Months later we received a pleasant note from the woman, in which she said that what her priest told her was not true! She added that she found many elements which delighted her, and she expressed anger that a member of the clergy had lied to her. This is a parallel situation in which many clergy have indoctrinated people without engaging in a true exploration of the theological, Biblical, pastoral, and cultural issues. As a result, people trustingly act on what various priests tell them. Their minds and spirits are intentionally narrowed by some clergy. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel September 23, 2014 at 11:22 am Alas, I gather Bishop von Rosenberg’s “wish for reconciliation” also meant *personally* suing another bishop. Don’t count on any other active priests to return to TEC. For Free, it may have been an *error*. For other priests, remaining in the Diocese of South Carolina IS the ONLY faithful thing to do. Most in the diocese have already left TEC and like our bishop, we understand reconciliation in a very different way i.e. a Biblical reconciliation not just something based on good feelings and wishes of some one in power. Actually as far as TEC is concerned, the priests of the Diocese of SC are indeed “deposed”. Reconciliation with TEC will only be possible when TEC repents of their heretical ways and begins the road back to being faithful Anglicans. Remember, most of the Anglican Communion is no longer in communion with TEC and many provinces consider the leaders of TEC heretics and Bishop von Rosenberg is *not* recognized as the bishop of South Carolina. So please get your facts correct! Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Robert R. Hansel says: September 23, 2014 at 12:28 pm You forget, Carol, that it is Bishop Lawrence suing Bishop von Rosenberg. Though more likely you are simply lying. Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Joe Gilliland says: Rich McDonough says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Harry W Shipps says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC October 5, 2014 at 5:14 pm Without waiting for 2015, Bishop vonRosenberg shows true leadership in his role of reconciliation with clergy. God will bless the church and raise us up again and again because of his and others’ acts of forgiveness and new life. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 September 19, 2014 at 5:25 pm This is exactly the way things should work—resolution through forgiveness and restitution. God’s harmony and unity can overcome every estrangement—if we can let go of old differences and the desire for punishment. Dr. Free has recognized his error, made amends, and is seeking to live out his vocation anew. For it’s part, the continuing Diocese has accepted and affirmed his repentance and extended restitution to Holy Orders. This is the pattern for peace and reconciliation, without rancor or division. Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Greg Brown says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ September 19, 2014 at 4:22 pm Welcome home, Fr. Free.+HWS Selena Smith says: Rector Bath, NC Zachary Brooks says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY By Holly BehrePosted Sep 19, 2014 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest [Episcopal Church in South Carolina] Bishop Charles G. vonRosenberg of South Carolina has welcomed a returning member of the clergy back into good standing as a priest, hailing the reinstatement of the Rev. H. Dagnall Free, Jr. as an important day for The Episcopal Church and an encouraging step toward reconciliation in South Carolina.On Tuesday, in a brief liturgy led by vonRosenberg, Free reaffirmed the vows he took at his ordination in 2010 and signed a formal declaration promising to conform to the doctrine, discipline and worship of The Episcopal Church.Free was a priest serving at St. John’s Episcopal Church on John’s Island in 2012, when a breakaway group under Bishop Mark Lawrence announced it was leaving The Episcopal Church. After the schism, a number of clergy remained with The Episcopal Church. However, Free stayed at St. John’s, which followed the breakaway group under Lawrence.Yet in the eyes of The Episcopal Church, he remained under vonRosenberg’s authority. Over a five-month period in 2013, the bishop made efforts to contact each breakaway clergy member. In most cases there was no reply. In August 2013, with the advice and consent of the Standing Committee, the bishop formally removed Free and more than 100 other priests and deacons from the ordained ministry.“After clergy left The Episcopal Church, I had the obligation to discipline them according to church canons,” vonRosenberg said. But the canons gave him a choice about which disciplinary procedure to follow. One option would be to “depose” clergy who did not recognize the Church’s authority. VonRosenberg chose instead to “release and remove” the clergy, which left open a possibility for reconciliation and eventual reinstatement.“I chose the less severe option in hopes that occasions like this one today might be facilitated,” the bishop said. “We rejoice when that goal becomes realized – even one person at a time.”The first step in that journey came in April 2014, when Free came to see vonRosenberg to ask if there was a path open for him to return. The bishop’s immediate answer: Yes.But the very first step was a difficult one: He had to acknowledge that he had been removed as a priest in The Episcopal Church. He became “Mr. Free,” stopped wearing his clerical collar, and ceased to perform the duties of an ordained minister. “He was under that discipline, and he was faithful to that,” the bishop said.Canonically, the only requirement for reinstatement was the bishop’s approval. But vonRosenberg said it was important to ensure that reinstatement was the right move – not only for one priest and one diocese, but for the church. “He’s a priest of the whole church, not just South Carolina,” he said.Creating a processA major hurdle involved Free’s personnel files, which are in the possession of the breakaway group that still controls the pre-2013 diocesan records. Officials there have refused to cooperate with any of the Episcopal Church clergy who have sought access to their professional records for their ongoing employment.Working in consultation with the Standing Committee, Chancellor Tom Tisdale, and Commission on Ministry member Amy Webb, the bishop set forth a reinstatement procedure that required:– Consulting with the Bishop on a regular, ongoing basis;– Working with a development coach for evaluations and discussions about his spiritual journey;– Cooperating with the administrative staff in rebuilding his professional file, including background checks, training certificates, references and other documentation. “Doing that was necessary for the protection of the whole Church,” the bishop said.– Meeting with the Standing Committee to discuss his desire for reinstatement.On September 11, having completed the initial steps, Free met with the Standing Committee. After a brief discussion, the committee unanimously approved a motion advising the Bishop in favor of reinstatement.VonRosenberg said the process has proven to be a good one, and likely will be used again. Discussions are occurring with other clergy who have had second thoughts about the schism. “It’s important that they know that this process is available,” the bishop said.When the 78th General Convention of The Episcopal Church meets in 2015, it likely will consider a resolution about reinstatement procedures, and South Carolina’s experience will be valuable to that discussion. “Once again, we’re on the leading edge in some ways,” vonRosenberg said.Looking aheadThe path ahead of Free still has its challenges. He is no longer employed at St. John’s. VonRosenberg and Archdeacon Calhoun Walpole, the deployment officer for The Episcopal Church in South Carolina, are assisting him in finding opportunities in Episcopal churches. Free and his wife Sallie are parents of two teenagers, and staying employed was one factor in his choice to remain at St. John’s when the schism took place. Another factor was that he enjoyed serving the people of that parish, and there were others as well. But Free told the Standing Committee that he does not offer them as excuses. “I made a mistake,” he said.“Part of what I had to learn is that you can’t take anything for granted. God will teach you, and re-teach you,” Free said on Tuesday.Free said that it seemed far from coincidence that the readings of the Daily Office this summer included the stories of Moses, Joshua, and finally Job. “It’s been kind of like walking through a desert,” he said. “But I think we’re through that now.”Walpole, who was present for the reinstatement liturgy Tuesday, said Free’s experience reminded her of the words of a prayer for the Church found in Eucharistic Prayer D, which asks God to “reveal its unity.”“Here we have an example of that unity today,” she said. “Even though we don’t always act like it, the reality is that the church is one.”— Holly Behre is director of communications for the Episcopal Church in South Carolina. Comments (11) Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service September 30, 2014 at 1:05 pm The writer seems to have forgotten that TEC IS recognized as being “in communion” with Canterbury, not some renegade “anglican” diocese in South Carolina. This group voluntarily left TEC, but seem to think that it is the other way around. How pathetic and delusional. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI September 29, 2014 at 6:39 pm And we celebrated Cyprian of Carthage just last week.! Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls Carol McRee says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET October 7, 2014 at 3:46 pm Everybody should believe in something. I believe I’ll have another drink! Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem September 19, 2014 at 11:38 pm That’s a wonderful story, but it leaves unanswered the question of how the Free family is currently staying financially afloat. Having introduced the issue of his unemployment into the narrative, you need to close that loop. Does Mrs. Free work outside the home, do they have other resources or arrangements they are keeping private now? If the church lacks some kind of interim arrangement for cases like this, it surely needs one. October 17, 2014 at 9:37 pm It will be interesting to see what the different church groups in the U.S. will look like in 50-100 years. If anything, the world is changing quickly and the advances in medicine, science, law, environmental studies, LGBT awareness and education, women’s concerns for equality in the job place and for women’s health, and more people being interested in spirituality rather than a religious doctrine, all contribute to a much more diverse and complex world that may or may not be concerned with all the theological differences and their goings on with different churches. According to the latest religious polls, the current change in church attendance is that it is way down, people are not wanting to attach themselves, financially or theologically to any one denomination. The new look is one of spirituality, peaceful meditation with onself and the universe and not necessarily a person-god-more of a force of the unexplained yet majestic cosmos. So, all the angst and worrisome arguments among church people with regards to being right or wrong, may eventually be a thing of the past. John Rawlinson says: Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Anne Bay says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

La Diócesis de la República Dominicana elige a Moisés Quezada…

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first_img Rector Shreveport, LA De la redacción de ENS Posted Jul 29, 2015 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Elections, People, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID El Rdo. Moisés Quezada Mota, al centro, fue electo obispo coadjutor de la Diócesis Episcopal de la República Dominicana el 25 de julio. Sucederá al Rvdmo. Julio César Holguín, que aquí aparece junto a él, cuando éste se jubile. Foto del Grupo Dominicano de Desarrollo.[Episcopal News Service] El Rdo. Moisés Quezada Mota ha sido electo obispo coadjutor de la Diócesis Episcopal de la República Dominicana, pendiente ahora del debido consentimiento de una mayoría de obispos con jurisdicción y de comités permanentes diocesanos de la Iglesia episcopal.Quezada, de 58 años y rector de las misiones de Jesús Nazareno y del Buen Samaritano en San Francisco de Macorís, resultó electo en la segunda votación de una lista de cuatro candidatos.Él recibió 23 votos, de 35, en el orden del laicado y 29, de 48, en el orden del clero. Para resultar electo, un candidato debía obtener un mínimo de 19 votos entre los laicos y 25 en el orden del clero.La elección se celebró el 25 de julio en la iglesia catedral de la Epifanía en Santo Domingo, durante una convención extraordinaria de la diócesis.Si el proceso de consentimiento resulta exitoso, Quezada sucederá al Rvdmo. Julio César Holguín en el momento en que éste se acoja a la jubilación.En conformidad con los Cánones (III.11.3) de la Iglesia Episcopal, una mayoría de los obispos con jurisdicción y de los comités permanentes diocesanos deben dar su consentimiento para la ordenación de Quezada como obispo coadjutor en no más de 120 días después de haber recibido el resultado de la elección.La información biográfica del obispo coadjutor electo puede encontrarse aquí.Una vez obtenido el debido consentimiento, Quezada será ordenado y consagrado obispo coadjutor de la Diócesis de la República Dominicana en febrero de 2016 en Santo Domingo. El obispo coadjutor servirá con Holguín hasta la jubilación de éste, que según la Constitución de la Iglesia Episcopal (Artículo II, Sección 1) debe tener lugar en el transcurso de los 36 meses siguientes a la consagración del obispo coadjutor.Los otros nominados fueron el Rdo. P. Salvador Patrick Ros Suárez, de 59 años y rector de la iglesia del Buen Pastor [Church of the Good Shepherd], en Rahway, Nueva Jersey, Diócesis of Nueva Jersey;  El Rdo. Ramón Antonio García De Los Santos, de 50 años y vicario de las misiones de San Lucas y La Anunciación, en Santiago, director de una escuela y arcediano en la región norte del país; y el Rdo. Daniel Samuel, de 58 años, vicario de las misiones de Santa María Virgen, Divina Gracia y San Cornelio, y director de una escuela.Aquí puede encontrarse información sobre todos los nominados. Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Latin America, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Province IX Rector Smithfield, NC La Diócesis de la República Dominicana elige a Moisés Quezada Mota obispo coadjutor Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI House of Bishops, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more