Tag Archives: Uriel

Premiers China Trade Mission Gets Results

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first_imgNova Scotia and Canada are seeing important results from the premiers’ trade mission to China. Yesterday in Beijing, Premier Darrell Dexter, who is leading the mission, met with the director of the State Oceanic Administration (SOA), which oversees ocean technology research and development for the Chinese government. During the meeting, Nova Scotia and SOA agreed to pursue co-operation in three areas: marine coastal management; marine disaster mitigation; and marine energy, including tidal energy. “This is a promising development that could result in tremendous opportunities to advance the province’s knowledge in this area, particularly in tidal energy,” said Premier Dexter. Also in Beijing, the premiers met with Chinese vice-premier Wang Qishan who serves under Premier Wen Jiabao in the State Council of the People’s Republic of China. During the meeting, the premiers discussed their ambitious trade and investment agendas in which Chinese markets play a key role. The premiers also met with Chen Deming, China’s Minister of Commerce, and discussed Canada’s relationship with China, including $65 billion worth of trade in 2010 and $15.4 billion worth of two-way investment. Canada’s provinces and territories play an important role in developing and maintaining this economic relationship. The premiers also discussed numerous opportunities to expand investment, given the conclusion of the Canada-China Foreign Investment and Protection Agreement negotiations. In addition, Premier Dexter and Premier Alison Redford co-led a meeting with Li Fanrong, CEO of China National Offshore Oil Corporation (CNOOC). Discussions focused on CNOOC’s desire to continue investment in Canadian energy projects and the premiers addressed investment opportunities in their provinces and territories. Premier Dexter also discussed the recent $970-million Shell Canada exploration investment in Nova Scotia’s offshore and other offshore opportunities. The premiers also had productive meetings with Huang Danhua, vice-chairwoman of the State-Owned Assets Supervision and Administration Committee (SASAC) and Zhang Xiaoqiang, vice-minister and deputy chairman of the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC). “Simply put, for Canada, trade means jobs,” said Premier Dexter. “What we have found these past few days is a generous host that is keen to develop the same economic ties that we are seeking.” Other business in China includes signing a new trade agreement between Atlantic Canada Resources and Shenzhen LeTianTian Food Company that will ensure the purchase of seafood from Nova Scotia continues. On Saturday, Premier Dexter will attend the signing of a memorandum of understanding between Cape Breton University and China Synfuels that will lead to an agreement to develop a Synfuels research and development laboratory at CBU’s Verschuren Centre. Under the agreement, the two parties will explore joint research programs and collaborate on commercialization of synthetic fuels. The premiers are leading a delegation of 110 business and institutional leaders on the mission. Premiers and delegates will proceed to Shanghai on Saturday and to Hong Kong on Sept. 19. The Council of the Federation mission ends Sept. 20. The Council of the Federation comprises all 13 provincial and territorial premiers. It allows premiers to work collaboratively to strengthen the Canadian federation by fostering a constructive relationship among the provinces and territories and with the federal government. For more information on the mission to China visit novascotia.ca/cof/ .last_img read more

Priyankas khaki shorts lead to troll trouble

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first_imgNew Delhi: It was a fashionable outing for Priyanka Chopra, but she became a target of trolls who took a dig at her decision to wear khaki shorts. In photographs which are viral on social media, Priyanka was spotted leaving a hotel in New York with her husband Nick Jonas. She opted for a black top along with high waisted khaki shorts for the outing. She upped the glamour quotient by adding a blazer and a pair of boots to complete her look. She also added a brace to her left knee. Also Read – Rihanna to release 500-page ‘visual’ autobiographyShe was seen with a large black bag in hand and accessorised her look with a pair of rectangular shades. The actor kept her wavy hair open. The look was an instant hit on the social media – wherein people appreciated her stylish appearance and some ridiculed it by comparing it with the uniform of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS). One person on social media wrote: “Priyanka Chopra finally joined RSS”, while another said: “International Brand Ambassador for #RSS.”last_img read more

Trump takes first step to scale back financial regulations

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by Jill Colvin, The Associated Press Posted Feb 3, 2017 3:39 am MDT Last Updated Feb 3, 2017 at 10:20 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Trump takes first step to scale back financial regulations In this Feb. 2, 2017, photo, President Donald Trump speaks in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. Trump is taking his first steps aimed at scaling back financial services regulations. The president will sign an executive order Friday that will direct the Treasury secretary to review the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial oversight law, which reshaped financial regulation after the 2008-09 financial crisis. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump is taking his first steps aimed at scaling back financial services regulations, and the Republican-run Congress cast a vote early Friday signalling that it’s eager to help.The president will sign an executive order Friday that will direct the Treasury secretary to review the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial oversight law, which reshaped financial regulation after the 2008-09 financial crisis.But first, the Senate used an unusual pre-dawn vote to approve legislation, 52-47, killing a regulation that has required oil and gas companies to disclose payments to the U.S. or foreign governments for commercial development. The House approved the measure this week, and Trump is expected to sign it.Republicans said the rejected regulation gives foreign competitors valuable information about U.S. firms and would hurt the economy. Democrats said erasing the requirement means big companies will be able to hide questionable dealings with foreign governments like Russia.Trump pledged during his campaign to repeal and replace the Dodd-Frank law, which also created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. A senior White House official outlined his executive order in a background briefing with reporters Thursday.“Dodd-Frank is a disaster,” Trump said earlier this week during a meeting with small business owners. “We’re going to be doing a big number on Dodd-Frank.”The president said he’ll be discussing the topic with top CEOs and banking executives at a meeting Friday morning at the White House, where attendees included Jamie Dimon, the CEO of JPMorgan Chase.“There’s nobody better to tell me about Dodd-Frank than Jamie, so you’re going to tell me about it,” Trump said.He told the group that he expects his administration “to be cutting a lot out of Dodd-Frank because frankly I have so many people, friends of mine that have nice businesses that can’t borrow money. They just can’t get any money because the banks just won’t let ’em borrow because of the rules and regulations of Dodd-Frank.”Trump’s order won’t have any immediate impact. But it directs the Treasury secretary to consult with members of different regulatory agencies and the Financial Stability Oversight Council and report back on potential changes.That likely includes a review of the CFPB, which vastly expanded regulators’ ability to police consumer products — from mortgages to credit cards to student loans.Trump administration officials, like other critics, argue Dodd-Frank did not achieve what it set out to do and portray it as an example of massive government over-reach.Trump will also sign a presidential memorandum Friday that instructs the Labor Department to delay implementing an Obama-era rule that requires financial professionals who charge commissions to put their clients’ best interests first when giving advice on retirement investments.The rule, which was set to take effect in April, will be delayed for 90 days while it’s reviewed.The so-called “fiduciary rule” was aimed at blocking financial advisers from steering clients toward investments with higher commissions and fees that can eat away at retirement savings.Critics argue the rule limits retirees’ investment choices by forcing asset managers to steer them to the lowest-risk options.__Follow Colvin on Twitter at https://twitter.com/colvinj read more

Stephen Hawkings former nurse suspended amid secret misconduct hearing

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Professor Stephen Hawking with nurse Patricia Dowdy Stephen Hawking’s former nurse has been suspended as a secret hearing takes place over allegations of “serious” misconduct, it has emerged.Patricia Dowdy, 61, has been banned from practicing since the scientist’s family lodged a complaint against her in 2016.A hearing into the case is currently taking place at the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), but the details of the allegations have been kept secret and the public and the media have been banned from attending.The decision to hold the tribunal behind closed doors has raised concerns about open justice.Mrs Dowdy worked for the A Brief History of Time author for around 15 years and was frequently seen at his side.Prof Hawking died aged 76 at his Cambridge home in March last year, more than 50 years after he was diagnosed with motor neurone disease.Cambridge is where the alleged “misconduct” took place, according to details on the NMC website.Further publicly available documents show that Mrs Dowdy was suspended in March 2016, a decision which is normally only taken when the allegations are sufficiently serious.The “substantive” hearing against her is likely to last until January 18, but it will remain behind closed doors. A source with knowledge of the inquiry told the Mail on Sunday that the allegations were “pretty serious”. In 2004 Professor Hawking’s second wife Elaine Mason was accused of abusing the physicist by ten nurses who had cared for him after he was repeatedly taken to hospital with injuries including a broken wrist, and cuts to his face and lip.Police took no action after both Prof Hawking and Ms Mason denied the allegations.It is not known whether Mrs Dowdy was one of the nurses involved in the complaint.A source close to Prof Hawking told the Telegraph: ““I knew Pat, she was lovely. She was fully qualified. I don’t know what this is all about, but I’m sure it’s nonsense. And now Stephen’s not here to protect her.”Matthew McClelland, Director of Fitness to Practise at the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) said: “Our legislation and guidance is very clear that hearings usually take place in public. “Sometimes there are important reasons – including in this particular case – why we hold hearings in private in order to protect the interests of all individuals affected. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Mrs Dowdy, from Ipswich, Suffolk, said that she had “no comment” to make on the proceedings.  Professor Stephen Hawking with nurse Patricia DowdyCredit:REX/Shutterstock read more