Tag Archives: 爱上海VN

Probe on Reclamation waste dumping sought

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first_imgHe wants to create a lookout bulletinfor the dissemination of information relative to pursuit of the perpetrators. City Ordinance No. 531, provides thatthe littering of plastics, papers, or any other refuse in open or publicplaces, water ways and recreational areas shall be prohibited, Lopez added./PN Lopez, who heads the SangguniangPanlungsod’s Committee on Environment, passed a resolution enjoining thePhilippine National Police (PNP), Land Transportation Office (LTO), BacolodTraffic Authority Office (BTAO), and other line agencies to conduct a thoroughinvestigation and manhunt operation for the perpetrators who dumped garbage inthe Reclamation Area. “It is highly requested that the PNP,LTO, BTAO and other line agencies to conduct a thorough investigation andpursue charges against perpetrators to give our laws some teeth to it and wouldinstill a sense of discipline to be observed by the residents of the City topromote ecological justice and sustainable development,” Lopez said. According to Lopez, a white pickup truckwas seen unloading wastes matters in bulk at reclamation area recently. Thiswas caught in a photograph that went viral on social media. center_img BACOLOD City – Councilor Carlos JoseLopez is seeking probe into the alleged illegal dumping of garbage at thecity’s Reclamation Area in Barangay 10. Lopez cited that Section 48 of RepublicAct 9003 or known as the “Ecological Solid Waste Management Act of2000” provides that the littering, throwing, dumping of waste matters inpublic places, such as roads, sidewalks, canals, parks, and establishment, orcausing or permitting the same is prohibited. He further said the transport anddumplog in bulk of collected domestic, industrial, commercial, andinstitutional wastes in areas other than centers or facilities prescribe by lawshall upon conviction, be punished with a fine not less than P10,000 but notmore than P200,000 or imprisonment of not less than thirty (30) days but notmore than three  years, or both.last_img read more

Syracuse basketball recruiting: PG target Alterique Gilbert chooses UConn

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first_imgThe 6-foot, 170-pound point guard had said Syracuse is his “dream school” in an interview with Scout.com’s Evan Daniels in May, but also said Syracuse had slowed his recruitment. Gilbert reportedly took his only official visit to UConn. The Orange’s slowing of its recruitment coincided with Class of 2016 guard Tyus Battle, also an SU target, decommitting from Michigan. Scout ranked the Miller Grove (Georgia) High School product 40th in the Class of 2016, 20 spots lower than Battle.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSU would have had 11 scholarship players listed for the 2016-17 season if Gilbert had committed, one more than the NCAA will allow Syracuse to have as a result of NCAA rules violations. A commitment from Providence transfer Paschal Chukwu filled SU’s last available scholarship in 2016-17 and put SU at 11 scholarships in 2015-16.In addition to Gilbert, Syracuse has offered guards Battle, Kobi Simmons and Kevin Huerter in the Class of 2016. Simmons and Huerter are ranked 5th and 63rd, respectively, by Scout. Battle reportedly made an official visit to Syracuse in late June after canceling his visit in May after initially committing to Michigan. Four-star power forward Matthew Moyer is SU’s only commit in the Class of 2016. Comments Published on July 4, 2015 at 9:19 am Contact Chris: cjlibona@syr.edu | @ChrisLibonati Syracuse Class of 2016 target Alterique Gilbert committed to Connecticut on Saturday, he announced via Twitter. Facebook Twitter Google+ Related Stories Syracuse basketball recruiting: Providence transfer Paschal Chukwu to join Orangelast_img read more

USC defeats UCI in home opener

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first_imgRedshirt junior goalie Holly Parker tallied nine saves in the Trojan’s bout with the Anteaters. (Colin Huang | Daily Trojan) “This was a very, very tough game,” Pintaric said. “And it was a good young team with a lot of young players. And with just losing against UCLA in a close game last weekend, it’s always hard emotionally to come back and play next because this is the home opener. So [the] girls had some pressures on and actually I’m very proud of the girls actually coming up with a victory and because mentally it is very hard to play this game.” The win puts the Trojans at 7-1 on the season and in good shape to face the Anteaters again in the Barbara Kalbus Invitational this weekend in Irvine, Calif. Tehaney commented on how the Anteater’s hard press from the beginning was something they were prepared to deal with in order to score. McIntosh would again bring one in to open scoring late in the third after several turnovers and offensive fouls on both sides. With just over 30 seconds left, the Anteaters got one in with sophomore center Piper Smith taking the lead on another power play. The Trojans didn’t let the period end there, with Guiral drawing another 5-meter penalty foul and Mammolito sending one to the back of the cage to bring the game to 6-2.  “I think we went into this game knowing that they were going to press us really hard,” Tehaney said. “So driving a lot and just making sure [to get] open, it was a key part. And you knew that they’re a hard-pressing team, so it was knowing beforehand.” The Trojans came into the first period strong with back-to-back goals from sophomore driver Grace Tehaney, the first within 30 seconds of the opening buzzer. With a goal from senior driver Denise Mammolito on a power play and a 5-meter penalty shot from senior driver Kelsey McIntosh drawn by sophomore 2-meter Mireia Guiral, the Trojans were up with 4 unanswered points. After preventing points from three straight UCI 6-on-5s, the Anteater’s junior attacker Calysa Toledo was able to slip one in to bring the score 4-1 going into halftime.  “I always tell my team to be aggressive,” said head coach Marko Pintaric of the power play opportunities that were missed. “The best way to score in six-on-five is, you know, right at the beginning when a quick, you know, when when defense is not settled yet.“So I emphasize that before the meeting, I think we were not aggressive enough.” The No. 3 USC women’s water polo team held off a late-game goal surge from visiting No. 6 UC Irvine this Saturday at its season’s home opener at Uytengsu Aquatics Center to defeat the Anteaters 9-6. The Trojans were resilient, and senior drivers McIntosh and Elise Stein saw to it that their two goals late in the fourth would go unanswered, along with redshirt junior goalie Holly Parker bringing her save total to 9 to seal the game total at 9-6. As the fourth brought a four-goal surge from the Anteaters, it would be the Trojan senior line, with key assists from Tehaney, that kept the team from falling under. The Anteaters scored back-to-back on a power play and in even strength within the first few minutes of the period, but Mammolito answered back with a point on the power play. The Anteaters brought another set of back-to-back scores to bring the game to 7-6 with under five minutes to go. last_img read more

Former DOE officials industry leaders urge Congress to protect agencys research budget

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first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country A solar panel array Originally published by E&E NewsFormer Republican officials, oil executives and business leaders are warning Congress and Energy Secretary Rick Perry that proposed budget cuts would have a devastating impact on national security and the economy.In a letter today, 14 energy and economic heavy hitters — including U.S. Chamber of Commerce CEO Thomas Donahue — urged appropriators to fund the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) and research and development programs to ensure that the United States maintains its competitive edge. By Christa Marshall, E&E NewsJun. 8, 2017 , 2:45 PM Former DOE officials, industry leaders urge Congress to protect agency’s research budget Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Read more… Signatories pointed to early federal research that helped develop hydraulic fracturing technologies as one example of why the private sector alone can’t fund critical innovation in energy.”Accelerating innovation and increasing American competitiveness are two goals that have always enjoyed broad-based support,” said the document.”This consensus has been sustained by an understanding that innovation has been a driving force behind American prosperity for decades,” it said.The Bipartisan Policy Center and American Energy Innovation Council organized the letter, which went out to both Republican and Democratic leaders of Appropriations committees in both chambers.Signers included Southern Co. CEO Tom Fanning, Exelon Corp. CEO Christopher Crane, Shell Oil Co. U.S. President Bruce Culpepper, Nuclear Energy Institute CEO Maria Korsnick, Former Undersecretary of the Army Norman Augustine, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers partner John Doerr, Pioneer Natural Resources Co. CEO Timothy Dove and PG&E Corp. Executive Chairman Anthony Earley Jr.Others were American Air Liquide Holdings Inc. CEO Michael Graff, Consumer Energy Alliance President David Holt, retired DuPont Chairman Chad Holliday, American Gas Association President Dave McCurdy and Clean Line Energy Partners LLC President Michael Skelly.The missive is unusual for including leaders representing both fossil fuel and low-carbon industries. It also comes on the same day that all seven of the former assistant secretaries who led the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy from 1989 to 2017 sent separate letters to appropriators and Perry warning that proposed DOE budget cuts could slash jobs and stall advances in areas like grid reliability.The Trump administration’s fiscal 2018 budget proposal would slash funding at the Office of Science by more than 15 percent, to $4.5 billion. Fossil research and development, including research on carbon capture technology, would see a cut from more than $600 million to $280 million.Funding for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), which supports research in wind, solar, geothermal and other clean energy technologies, would plunge by about 69 percent, from more than $2 billion to $636 million. ARPA-E’s and DOE’s loan programs are targeted for elimination.The Trump administration said funding reductions are necessary to focus DOE’s efforts on its core missions and basic research.”This budget delivers on the promise to reprioritize spending in order to carry out DOE’s core functions efficiently and effectively while also being fiscally responsible and respectful to the American taxpayer,” Perry said after the budget proposal’s release.DOE did not respond to a request for comment about the letters.Many conservatives say the private sector should lead some of the research that DOE is doing. Programs have picked winners and losers rather than letting the market drive things, they say.But the business executives and former administration officials say the type of research being targeted for cuts is too high-risk for private industry, even though it could be transformational.The former assistant secretaries said that while they have not always agreed in the past on the DOE budget, the proposed cuts to EERE and other offices are so steep that they would harm America’s “energy future.””This is a particularly inauspicious time to cut the EERE budget,” they wrote. Three EERE chiefs in both Bush administrations signed, along with four EERE heads from the Obama and Clinton administrations.China, in particular, is reorganizing its energy R&D efforts on many technologies that were first developed in the United States at taxpayer expense, they said.Cuts to DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability could harm efforts to bolster the grid at a time when it is vulnerable to threats and in a state of flux, said the letter.”R&D to develop the capabilities needed in a modernized grid is critical, yet the electric utility sector invests just .2 percent of sales in R&D,” it said.In addition to supporting renewable and vehicle research, EERE sets mandatory efficiency levels for appliances. Despite “occasional controversy,” the program has bipartisan support, and existing standards could save consumers nearly $2 trillion on utility bills by 2030, the letter said.Reprinted from Greenwire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2017. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.net Email Wikimedia Commons/Photo courtesy of U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Nadine Y. Barclay last_img read more