Monthly Archives: September 2019

Seattle Seahawks Cut Antoine Winfield

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Antoine Winfield won’t be playing cornerback with the Seattle Seahawks for the 2013/2014 football season. Winfield  won’t make it onto the field and will be among Seattle’s cuts on Saturday, as the team slims its roster down to 53 players by the 6 p.m. ET deadline.Considered one of the NFL’s better run-stoppers, it has been reported that Seattle might attempt to shop Winfield before releasing him. A team interested in padding their roster with the 36-year-old former pro bowler  might listen, but Winfield is primarily a nickel-type at this stage in his career.The release of Winfield suggests that the Seahawks are committed to Jeremy Lane and Walter Thurmond lll in the cornerback position. read more

11Seeds Are Dangerous This Year

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There’s been plenty of confusion surrounding the decisions that the NCAA Tournament selection committee made for this year’s bracket. Accusations of underseeding and overseeding abound. But do the numbers bear it all out? In this video, Neil Paine and Reuben Fischer-Baum dig deep into FiveThirtyEight’s March Madness predictions to uncover the most head-scratching seedings, including a batch of 11-seeds ready to wreak havoc on your bracket.

Ohio State football reunion doesnt rule out Tressel Clarett

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The guest list for the Ohio State’s 2002 national championship team reunion consists of three or four names, but it won’t stay that short for long.The defensive captain of the 2002 Buckeyes, which secured its place in OSU football lore with a 31-24, double overtime win against Miami (Fla.) in the 2003 Fiesta Bowl, isn’t ruling out appearances from former OSU coach Jim Tressel or tailback Maurice Clarett.OSU’s 2002 national championship squad will reconvene at Ohio Stadium for the Buckeyes’ Nov. 24 game against Michigan where they it will be recognized by the university and conduct other celebratory activities on its own.Former OSU safety Mike Doss, the defensive MVP of the 2002 national championship game, told The Lantern Thursday that he has been planning the event on behalf of the entire team. Former quarterback Craig Krenzel, safety Donnie Nickey and cornerback Dustin Fox have been “in constant communication to make everything go.”Doss told The Lantern that he, Krenzel, Nickey and Fox might be the only four players committed to the event for now, but more members of the 2002 team are expected to join in the festivities.Tressel could be among the attendees too, Doss said.“I don’t think it would be an issue with coach Tressel coming back and reuniting with his players of the past knowing that he was our coach,” Doss said. “Knowing what kind of impact he had on us. What kind of impact we had on him and his career, I don’t think that would feel uncomfortable for him at all because we love coach Tressel, we support him as OSU supports each and every one of us.“Right now you’ve got three or four guys … Just the little bit of hints that we’ve reached out, that I think everyone would be committed and involved as much as they can.”OSU athletic director Gene Smith shared similar sentiments during a radio interview on WBNS-FM 97.1 about a possible return to Ohio Stadium for Tressel, saying it wouldn’t be awkward at all if Tressel came back.Tressel was forced to resign as OSU coach May 30 after it was discovered he was aware of players violations that occurred during the 2010 season, failed to report the violations and fielded ineligible players during the 2010 season, which was later vacated.Tressel did not immediately respond to The Lantern‘s Thursday request for comment.Doss said he and his three teammates planning the event wouldn’t accept a celebration of their national championship that didn’t include Tressel, as well as Clarett.Clarett ran for 1,237 yards and 16 touchdowns during the Buckeyes’ championship run. After the season, Clarett sued the NFL in an attempt to declare for the 2004 NFL Draft.Later, Clarett pleaded guilty to aggravated assault with a concealed weapon and served three-and-a-half years in a Toledo prison.Doss said Tressel and Clarett’s transgressions are separate issues from the on-field accomplishments of the 2002 championship team.“Coach Tressel was a part of that team. He was the nucleus,” Doss said. “Maurice Clarrett – one of the best tailbacks to play at Ohio State for one season and a career. You know, he was a phenomenal player for us that year. We would not accept anything presented to the university if both of those guys weren’t included.“We all communicated to ourselves that anything that was going to be organized has to include each and every one that was involved. Period. If that was going to be an issue then we would have respectfully declined. But the university embraced coach Tressel and Maurice.”Clarett did not immediately respond to The Lantern‘s Thursday request for comment but indicated he would attend the reunion on Twitter.From his account, @ReeseClarett13, Clarett said, “indeed my friend….,” in response to a question regarding whether he would attend the event.Clarett said in a later tweet: “me and Tress have been cool since before I went to prison. A lot of ppl don’t know that. I couldn’t do it (without) him.”Doss said the timing for a reunion is right for several reasons, but most of all because the 2002 championship is the university’s only one in the last 10 years, as well as for nearly 40 years prior to that.Aside from university recognition, Doss said he, Krenzel, Nickey and Fox are working on preparing a dinner reception and a tailgate prior to the noon kickoff against the Wolverines.There is also interest in returning to show support for the current team, as well as first-year coach Urban Meyer and his staff, Doss said.The Buckeyes’ opponent that day was a factor too.“It’s coach Meyer’s first Michigan game,” Doss said. “It’ll be an opportunity for a lot of support to be there for the coaching staff and it’s Michigan – that’s all you have to say.” read more

Ohio State Athlete of the Week Mens tennis Peter Kobelt

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Placing second at the 2012 ITA All-American Championships Sunday in Tulsa, Okla., Ohio State men’s tennis’ redshirt junior Peter Kobelt is more than pleased with his performance on the Case Tennis Center courts.“I was very happy with my performance, I beat five guys who are high on their respective team’s line-ups,” Kobelt said. “Being able to put five matches together like that and play that long in the tournament shows that I have been doing the right things over the summer training-wise and conditioning-wise. It was really nice to see.”The New Albany, Ohio, native won five matches, two of which were against top 10-ranked players. Kobelt fell in the singles finale to No. 6-seeded Alex Domijan of Virginia, 7-5, 6-1.Kobelt attributed his wins to his serving strengths and mobility.“I was serving at a very high percentage for serves and I was able to get around and hit a lot of forehands in the beginning to control the court,” Kobelt said.Coach Ty Tucker said he was impressed with Kobelt’s finish.“Obviously it was very strong, to finish No. 2 in the nation at that tournament is big,” Tucker said. “It’s the first time we have had a player finish in the individual All-American singles.”The redshirt junior also played in the doubles bracket beside senior Connor Smith, but the duo left Tulsa, Okla., without a doubles title after falling in the second round of competition.“We played OK, but we came up short, we played a tough team and it was bad weather,” Smith said. “It was only pro sets so it was tough, but we came out a bit slow.”In addition to finishing second in the nation this week, Kobelt is ranked as the No. 35 tennis player in the countrybut he said he was not sure of the ranking at first.“I had a general idea on where I would be from last season with the ongoing seniors that left,” Kobelt said. “I don’t know how comfortable I was, I had an OK season but I wasn’t too confident right from the beginning.”Tucker said Kobelt’s ranking has come as a result of the player utilizing his strengths as a player.“His biggest strengths are his serve and the fact that he is a junior now, but a redshirt junior, so it’s his fourth year and he knows what is expected of him,” Tucker said. “He knows what kind of game he has and what he needs to do.”Kobelt and the Buckeyes are scheduled to travel to East Lansing, Mich., on Oct. 18, to compete in the USTA/ITA Midwest Regional Championships. read more

Joey Bosa a dominating force for Buckeye defense

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OSU sophomore defensive lineman Joey Bosa sacks Cincinnati redshirt-sophomore quarterback Gunner Kiel in a game Sept. 27 at Ohio Stadium. OSU won 50-28Credit: Chelsea Spears / Multimedia editorWhen Ohio State’s Joey Bosa drilled Cincinnati quarterback Gunner Kiel on Saturday and forced a fumble that ultimately resulted in a safety, the record crowd at Ohio Stadium erupted.Bosa wasn’t even sure where the ball landed.“I just made a move inside and my eyes got big and I ran as fast as I can and hit him as hard as I could,” Bosa, a sophomore defensive lineman, said Saturday following the game. “I actually thought he got the ball off so I stood up and went to walk back to the line, but I saw the ball pop out.”The play not only electrified the fans and gave OSU a 16-7 lead, but it seemed to ignite the defense for a stretch in the first quarter as the Buckeyes forced the Bearcats into two straight punts.Co-defensive coordinator and linebackers coach Luke Fickell said Monday that the play of Bosa, who leads the Buckeyes with 2.5 sacks, is at least partially because of his 6-foot-5-inch, 278-pound frame.“He is a very dominating force. He is a guy who has the speed to get the edge, but he’s got the power to do some things inside,” Fickell said. “It is an unbelievable combination. I haven’t seen a whole lot of guys like it, but we are still going to expect him to continue to grow.”Junior cornerback Armani Reeves said Bosa’s play on the field makes him glad Bosa’s a Buckeye.“He’s a freak. He is a great player and when you see him (make) those hits like that … it’s like watching greatness,” Reeves said Monday. “I am just happy he is on our side.”Coach Urban Meyer acknowledged Bosa’s physical skills, but added the Fort Lauderdale, Fla., product is also successful because of his upbringing.“He just goes, he practices that way from day one. It’s a product of, you know, his family. His dad’s got an incredible football background,” Meyer said Monday. “I thought we’d have a guy that would be pretty much game-ready because he went to a really quality high school program.”Bosa’s high school, St. Thomas Aquinas, has been known to produce high-quality football talent, including former OSU safety Nate Salley, former Wisconsin player and current New England Patriot running back James White and former Chicago Bear Brian Piccolo, who was the inspiration for the movie “Brian’s Song.”Meyer also said that while he believed Bosa would be ready to play coming out of high school, he is still impressed with how the sophomore has performed so far.“I didn’t imagine it to be this ready,” Meyer said. “He’s extremely strong and quick and relentless. And on top of that. he loves and understands the game.”Meyer has coached an impressive array of defensive linemen in his coaching career, including two at Florida who were first-round draft picks (Jarvis Moss, Denver, 2007 and Derrick Harvey, Jacksonville, 2008), however, he said Bosa reminds him most of a player he has coached at OSU.“I think John Simon. He’s a little more talented than John, a little longer,” Meyer said. “But John Simon had that same — you watch those two play in practice and compete and there’s a mindset.“Those are two good people to be in company, everybody knows how we all feel about John Simon. But to even mention someone in that same vein, who is a few inches taller and a little longer, that’s pretty rare air, those two guys.”Meyer’s comparison could be spot on, as Simon led the Buckeyes in sacks during his senior season in Columbus, something Bosa is on pace to do just two years later.With such high praise and potential, Fickell said he, along with the rest of the coaching staff, is expecting even more from Bosa, who was named OSU’s defensive player of the game following his play against Cincinnati.“The sky is the limit for that guy with his abilities. We are going to continue to put things upon his shoulders,” Fickell said. “He goes hard, he is physical, he does all the things we ask him to do, now we are going to ask him to continue to grow — strive for greatness and not be satisfied with where you are.”Bosa and the Buckeyes are scheduled to hit the field again Saturday at noon against the Maryland Terrapins at Byrd Stadium in College Park, Md. read more

Opinion Its time for the state of Ohio to allow spring practice

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California, Texas, Florida and Ohio.These four states are synonymous with historically dominant high school football, but three have a leg up on the other: Ohio is the only state out of the group that does not allow spring practices for high school football teams. It is time for that to change.As someone who played high school football in Ohio and has seen the game through the eyes of a coach, I know spring practice could be more than beneficial for the Ohio High School Athletic Association.I understand the health of the players is a concern, but even allowing non-contact practices at this time of year would help players get acclimated to a playbook and to each other.There is no arguing that California, Texas and Florida produce some of the best, if not the best, pro prospects coming out of college and I have to believe the extra practices have something to do with it.If Ohio wants to be a part of that conversation, adding just 10-15 spring practices could give it the boost it needs.California allows 10 practices, Texas allows 15, and Florida allows 20 practices while Ohio high school football players are either playing another sport or living in the weight room.According to multiple studies, Ohio ranked fifth in players born in the respective states behind California (224), Florida (186), Texas (147) and Georgia (91) that are currently in the NFL with 78.If you were wondering, Georgia also allows spring practice.I’m not saying that if Ohio allowed spring practice it would instantly produce more NFL players, but I am saying it would give more players a chance to shine on the field and get noticed.It would also give coaches — especially incoming coaches — a chance to see what their new team is capable of and develop a depth chart going into summer practice.I never had a chance of playing on the varsity squad as a sophomore in high school, but I was behind the eight-ball to begin with when I had to learn an entirely new playbook in just weeks before two-a-day sessions began in August.This is the dilemma that high school football players all over Ohio have to deal with, and if there is a player who is talented enough to get varsity time as a sophomore or even as a freshman, spring practice would get them ready to make an impact in the fall.For now, Ohio high school coaches will need to continue to prepare their teams as best they can in the weight room in the spring while other coaches in the football hotbeds are allowed to blow their whistles on the field and install their playbooks.Make the change, OHSAA. It’s for the kids. read more

Man charged with murder of London banker Oliver Dearlove

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first_imgA man has been charged with murder after the death of a banker feared to have been killed by a single punch.Oliver Dearlove, 30, died after allegedly being hit by a man while waiting for a taxi on a night out in Blackheath in south-east London on Sunday. Oliver Dearlove with girlfriend Claire WheatleyCredit:Chris Greenwood Oliver Dearlove with girlfriend Claire Wheatley Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Trevor Timon, 31, of south-east London, has been charged with murder and common assault, Scotland Yard said.He will appear at Bromley Magistrates’ Court on Friday.Mr Dearlove, from Eltham, had been in a bar with friends in Montpelier Vale earlier in the night before heading to Tranquil Vale.The relationship manager at Duncan Lawrie Private Bank died in hospital.A post-mortem examination gave the provisional cause of his death as a head injury.last_img read more

Plasticeating wax worm extremely exciting for global pollution crisis

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first_imgThe global plastic bag pollution crisis could be solved by a waxworm capable of eating through the material at “uniquely high speeds”, scientists have announced.Researchers have described the tiny caterpillar’s ability to break down even the toughest plastics as “extremely exciting” and said the discovery could be engineered into an environmentally-friendly solution on an industrial scale.Around a trillion plastic bags are used around the world each year, of which a huge number find their way into the oceans or are discarded into landfill. It’s extremely, extremely exciting because breaking down plastic has proved so challengingDr Paolo Bombelli, Cambridge University Worms in petri dish Commonly found living in bee hives, or harvested as fishing bait, the waxworm proved it could eat its way through polyethylene, which is notoriously hard to break down, more than 1,400 times faster than other organisms.Scientists believe the creature has potent enzymes in its saliva or gut which attack plastic’s chemical bonds, in the same way they digest the complex wax found in hives.The waxworm’s potential was discovered by accident when biologist and amateur beekeeper Federica Bertocchini cleaned out her hives and temporarily placed the parasites in a plastic shopping bag. Polyethlylene is the most common plastic in the world and is primarily used for plastic bags and packaging.In tests at Cambridge, 100 waxworms were let loose on plastic bag from a British supermarket, with holes appearing after just 40 minutes.Over a period of 12 hours, 92mg of plastic had been consumed.By contrast, previous trials using bacteria had found the microbes could only work through 0.13mg of plastic in 24 hours.The Cambridge researchers, along with colleagues at the Institute of Biomedicine and Biotechnology of Cantabria (CSIC), used spectroscopic analysis to show the chemical bonds in the plastic were breaking when exposed to the waxworms.The creatures transformed the polyethylene into an “un-bonded” substance called ethylene glycoll.Published in the journal Current Biology, the study says it is likely that digesting the beeswax found in hives involves breaking down similar types of chemical bonds.The beeswax on which the worms grow is composed of a rich diversity of compounds including fats, oils and some hormones. She soon noticed it had become riddled with holes.To confirm it was not just the caterpillars’ chewing mechanism that was degrading the plastic, researchers “mashed up” some of the worms and smeared them on polyethylene bags, which achieved similar results.“It’s extremely, extremely exciting because breaking down plastic has proved so challenging,” said Paolo Bombelli from Cambridge University.“If a single enzyme is responsible for this chemical process, its reproduction on a large scale using biotechnological methods should be achievable.”He said the most likely scenario was one whereby existing recycling plants could be adapted to biodegrade mass quantities of plastic using the newly discovered enzyme or enzymes.But he added the enzymes could one day possibly be sprayed directly onto landfill sites or even infused into sea plants in order to degrade plastic already in the environment. The plastic was biodegraded by 10 worms in 30 minutesCredit:Cesar Hernandez Enzymes in the worms’ saliva are thought to be the crucial factorCredit:Cesar Hernandez The waxworm makes short work of the polyethylene plastic The plastic was biodegraded by 10 worms in 30 minutes The waxworm makes short work of the polyethylene plasticCredit:Paolo Bombelli/SWNS Dr Bertocchini, who led the research at CSIC , said: “We are planning to implement this finding into a viable way to get rid of plastic waste, working towards a solution to save our oceans, rivers, and all the environment from the unavoidable consequences of plastic accumulation.”British supermarkets have faced increasing calls in recent months to introduce plastic-free aisles, in a bid to cut down on the amount of plastic exposed to the environment.The campaign has been spurred by research by the The Ellen MacArthur Foundation which predicts that by 2050 there will be more plastic in the world’s oceans by weight than fish.Dr Bombelli said any initiatives to biodegrade plastic had to come alongside efforts to prevent the use of it in the first place.The 5p charge which was added to plastic bags in October 2015 has seen use fall by 80 per cent, and the government is currently considering adding a charge of up to 20p to plastic bottles, which can be reclaimed when they are recycled. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Soaring NHS negligence bill could have paid for 6500 more doctors

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first_imgAnd it said the NHS had was facing increasing numbers of claims which had no merit – with almost 5,000 failed claims in 2015/16.On current trends, the NHS will spend £2.6bn a year on claims by 2022, says the report, which calls for wholesale reform of the legal system, including fixed recoverable costs for claims up to £250,000 to stop lawyers charging “disproportionate” legal fees.It also suggests that calulations for damages should be based on the loss of average earnings, not actual earnings. Baby Joshua Titcombe died after hospital staff failed to provide antibiotics for an infection  A Department of Health spokesman said: “We agree that clinical negligence costs are too high – so we’re taking action to drive these down. We have consulted on proposals to cap exorbitant payments going to lawyers, and NHS Resolution will give hospitals incentives to learn from mistakes so that costs are reduced just as patient care improves.” Jeremy Hunt  NHS spending on medical blunders could fund more than 6,000 more doctors, with costs soaring by more than 70 per cent in just five years, new figures show.The Medical Protection Society (MPS) said current trends will see annual spending hit £2.6bn within five years, and could threaten the survival of the NHS.The organisation, which advises more than 300,000 medics, called for sweeping changes to the legal system, to limit the amount spent on lawyers, and cuts to damages payouts.Its experts said increasing patient expectations and disportionate legal costs were fuelling costs which were not affordable.In the five years to 2015/16, the total number of claims has risen by 27 per cent, official figures show.But the costs rose by 72 per cent over the same period, with £1.5bn paid out in 2015/16, the report shows.The figure could pay for the training of 6,500 doctors, the report says.Many of the most expensive claims involve babies left brain damaged at birth.Since 2004/5, the value of claims against NHS maternity units for brain damage and cerebral palsy has risen from £354m to £990m, official figures show.The cases – often linked with a failure to monitor babies’ heart rates, to detect risks of oxygen starvation – fuelled maternity negligence claims of more than £1.2bn in 2015/16. Joshua with sister Emily center_img This means higher earners would not receive more from the NHS in compensation than lower earners for a similar claim.And it calls for a limits on future care costs, and a 10 year limit on making a claim.Emma Hallinan, director of claims at the MPS, said: “It is important that there is reasonable compensation for patients harmed following clinical negligence, but a balance must be struck against society’s ability to pay. If the current trend continues the balance will tip too far and the cost risks becoming unsustainable for the NHS and ultimately for society.”This is without doubt a difficult debate to have, but difficult decisions are made about spending in healthcare every day and we have reached a point where the amount society pays for clinical negligence must be one of them,” she said. The report found GPs are now twice as likely to be sued for clinical negligence as they were a decade ago, with the highest claim paid costing £5.5m. Jeremy Hunt has set out plans which aim to dramatically reduce the number of tragedies where babies die or are harmed for life Credit:Eddie Mulholland Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Say what Turning right ear to sound helps you hear better scientists

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first_imgIt is the first time the effect has been found to work in adults.”Conventional research shows that right-ear advantage diminishes around age 13, but our results indicate this is related to the demand of the task,” said Dr Aurora Weaver, assistant professor at Auburn and member of the research team. The research could help scientists improve hearing aids  The research could help scientists improve hearing aids Credit:Panther Media GmbH / Alamy Stock Photo  “Cognitive skills, of course, are subject to decline with advanced aging, disease, or trauma,” added Dr Weaver.”Therefore, we need to better understand the impact of cognitive demands on listening.”The research was presented at the annual Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, which will be held in New Orleans, Louisiana. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Listening with the right ear stimulates the left side of the brain which processes language center_img For the new experiment, 41 participants aged between 19 and 28 were asked to wear a headset and recall a list of numbers played into either their right, or left ear piece.The researchers found that when the list of numbers was small – fewer than six digits – there was no difference in ear performance. However as the list grew, results were an average of eight per cent better when the numbers were played into to the right hand ear. The performance of some individuals improved as much as 41 per cent for the right ear.Scientists knew that children hear more easily through the right ear but it was thought that by adulthood, both ears had taken on equal load.The team are hoping the research will help improve hearing aids and deafness testing. Listening with the right ear stimulates the left side of the brain which processes language  Researcher Danielle Sacchinelli added: “The more we know about listening in demanding environments, and listening effort in general, the better diagnostic tools, auditory management, including hearing aids, and auditory training will become.”Recent research also suggested that loss of hearing is a major risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease, because it puts a greater strain on the brain when interpreting sound.So the new study could also help scientists understand how deafness impacts neurodegenerative diseases. Many people, when struggling to hear, will naturally cock their head to the right hand side, in a bid to improve the sound.But a new study has shown that the instinctual movement has a scientific basis. The right ear is indeed better equipped for not only listening but also making sense of noise.And it is to do with how the brain interprets sound.Listening is a complex task which requires not only sensitive hearing, but also the ability to turn the information into meaning. Once you add the distraction of background noise and the constant interruptions of modern life, that ability to comprehend becomes far more tricky.However sound entering the right ear is processed by the left side of the brain, which controls speech, language development, and portions of memory.So turning the right ear towards the speaker, or noise source, will allow more information to travel to the side of the brain where it can be more easily interpreted, according to audiology researchers at Auburn University in Alabama, US.last_img read more