Author Archives: admin

Canadian doc Rumble wins at Sundance Film Festival

by ,

first_img Facebook Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment In the film, guitarist and songwriter Robbie Robertson of The Band shares childhood memories of time he spent on the Brantford, Ont.-area Six Nations of the Grand River reserve with his mother’s family. He was advised: “Be proud you are Indian; but be careful who you tell.”Whether the musicians in Rumble talked about their backgrounds or not, their heritage influenced the work, including 1920s Delta bluesman Charley Patton, “Queen of Swing” Mildred Bailey, rock legend Jimi Hendrix and guitarist Jesse Ed Davis, who worked with blues musician Taj Mahal, John Lennon and the Rolling Stones.Many of them agreed to appear in Rumble because of their friendship with the film’s executive producer, guitarist Stevie Salas.Salas said he had no idea there were so many indigenous musicians until he was interviewed by Canadian writer Brian Wright-McLeod for his 2004 book The Encyclopedia of Native Music.Through archival footage and powerful performances, indigenous artists are acknowledged as influences by more than three dozen marquee performers, including crooner Tony Bennett, funk father George Clinton, Guns N’ Roses guitarist Slash and protopunk legend Iggy Pop. Montreal-based filmmakers Catherine Bainbridge and Alfonso Maiorana have won an award at the Sundance Film Festival for their documentary Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked The World.The film — which explores the often-unheralded contributions of Native Americans in shaping popular song — won the World Cinema Documentary Special Jury Award for Masterful Storytelling on Saturday.The Star’s movie critic Peter Howell listed Rumble as one of the top 10 films that dazzled at the festival. Rumble had its world premiere a week ago in competition at Sundance and will air on The Movie Network later this year.In accepting the award, Bainbridge gave a shout out to “all the indigenous experts and historians and musicians involved in making this film.”“It was not just us,” Bainbridge said. The power chords from Link Wray’s 1958 banned-by-radio instrumental “Rumble,” which was an inspiration for rock guitarists who followed, kick off the documentary. Wray was a Shawnee native American but few people were aware of his background.Like him, many of the musicians profiled in Rumble either kept their heritage secret or downplayed it, fearing racist backlash. Advertisement Login/Register With: Twitter Advertisementlast_img read more

Nova Scotia rapper Classified wins ECMA Song of Year for Snoop Dogg

by ,

first_imgLes Hotesses d’Hilaire walked away with two awards on the night — Francophone Recording of the Year and Group Recording of the Year. The rapper, from Enfield, N.S., produced the tune, which also samples a song from emerging Cape Breton-born, Halifax based singer-songwriter Dave Sampson. “Once again, the awards show proved to be an excellent way to kick off the ECMAs,” said Andy McLean, the group’s executive director. Advertisement SAINT JOHN, N.B. — A fun collaboration with Snoop Dogg called “No Pressure” rewarded Nova Scotia rapper Classified with the Song of the Year award Thursday night at the annual East Coast Music Awards. — By Kevin Bissett in Fredericton LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Old Man Luedecke captured Album of the Year for his Domestic Eccentric. Produced by Tim O’Brien, the album was recorded in a small cabin in the snowy Nova Scotia woods. Ever-popular Lennie Gallant was named the Fans’ Choice Entertainer of the year. Industry sessions and local performances continue though the weekend. The awards show, hosted by comedian James Mullinger, was held in Saint John, N.B. The remaining 2017 East Coast Music Awards, including the Industry Awards, will be handed out over the course of the weekend as the festival continues in Saint John. Tristan Horncastle had the Country Recording of the Year with “Turnin’ Up a Sundown.” Like a Motorcycle took home the coveted Rising Star Recording of the Year award for their hard-driving rock tune “High Hopes.” Login/Register With: Facebook The East Coast Music Association is a regional collaboration of people in the music industry to foster, develop and celebrate East Coast music and its artists. Advertisement Other winners Thursday night included War Horses for Indigenous Artist of the Year, and The Motorleague with Rock Recording of the Year for “Holding Patterns.” The show featured live performances by David Myles, Classified, Ria Mae, Tomato/Tomato, and others. Advertisement Classified also produced Ria Mae’s self-titled album, which captured the award for Solo Recording of the year. Mae’s album featuring “Clothes Off” became a smash hit on the Canadian radio charts and grabbed a Juno nomination for single of the year — a category based on sales. Twitterlast_img read more

Ottawa film scholar teams up with Martin Scorsese to restore lost African

by ,

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With: An African film scholar in Ottawa is working to locate, restore and disseminate films from his home continent — with the help of legendary American director Martin Scorsese.The African Film Heritage Project, a joint program from UNESCO, Martin Scorsese’s Film Foundation World Cinema Project and the Fédération Panafricaine des Cinéastes, aims to preserve culturally significant movies and allow more Africans to see themselves on the silver screen.Lifelong cinephile Aboubakar Sanogo says it’s an unfortunate reality that people can spend their entire lives in Africa without seeing some of the continent’s most famous films. Advertisement READ MORE Twitterlast_img read more

Nunavuts blazing blades

by ,

first_imgAPTN National NewsIt looks like team Nunavut is beginning to find its stride at the 2011 Canada Winter Games.Speed skating is relatively new to the territory.As APTN National News reporter James Hopkin found out, the sport is picking up speed at a break-neck pace.last_img

Haitian offender granted elder assisted parole hearing

by ,

first_imgAPTN National NewsElder assisted parole hearings are normally reserved for Aboriginal inmates.But now one father wants to know why it’s possible for his daughter’s murderer to receive this special parole hearing despite the fact he is not Aboriginal.APTN National News reporter Ossie Michelin has this story.last_img

Nunavut faces second territorywide protest over high food prices

by ,

first_imgAPTN National NewsNunavut saw a second territory-wide protest over high food prices this week.As APTN National News reporter Kent Driscoll found out, no matter the size or location of their community, people took to the streets with one message: Food in Nunavut is too expensive.last_img

Verdict expected Thursday in New Brunswick antifracking protests

by ,

first_imgAPTN National NewsTwo Mi’kmaq men arrested during the anti-fracking protests in New Brunswick last year are in jail.In fact, they’ve been there for nearly eight months awaiting trial.The trial is over now and Thursday a judge will decide if they’ll be staying there.APTN has been following this case.APTN’s Trina Roache has more.last_img

Residential schools archive set to open doors

by ,

first_imgThe Canadian Press WINNIPEG—An archive housing the national memory of residential schools is set to open its doors, but must balance concerns from survivors with educating the public about one of the darkest chapters in Canadian history.The National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation at the University of Manitoba will house millions of records collected by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The records _ some of which were sealed for decades _ include everything from school inspection reports to heartbreaking testimony from survivors who detailed graphic accounts of sexual and physical abuse.For survivors from across the country who have met with centre director Ry Moran, the archive is deeply personal and threatens to revictimize them if it isn’t handled carefully.Survivors who testified before the commission were allowed to dictate what part of their stories they wanted to be part of the public record. But government and church records in the archive contain personal medical information, racist language, details about family relationships and the names of survivors and their family members.“While we have a very pressing and very real mandate to make as much of the collection available as possible, we’re also being told to do no harm in the release of the information and do things in as respectful a way as possible,” Moran said in an interview.“What we’re hearing from survivors is, ‘We want Canadians to know what it was like for us in those schools, but we don’t necessarily want Canadians to have access to all of our personal, intimate details.’”About 150,000 First Nations, Inuit and Metis children were taken from their families and forced to attend the government schools over much of the last century in a bid to “take the Indian out of the child.”The last school closed outside Regina in 1996.The $60-million commission was part of a landmark compensation deal between Ottawa, the Crown and residential school survivors. It visited hundreds of communities and heard testimony from 7,000 survivors.The archive’s opening ceremonies are to be held next Tuesday and Wednesday. At the beginning, Moran said, the centre will be cautious about what records are publicly available.Public access may change over time but, for now, the wound of residential schools is still very raw, Moran said.“These, in many ways, are their records first, and it’s time to put them in the driver’s seat in terms of what happens with this material. For so long, they weren’t in the driver’s seat. It was disclosed by government agencies or not. It was locked up by the church archive or not.”Commissioner Marie Wilson said the centre’s goal is to further reconciliation—something that “can’t happen in sealed vaults.”She said there is no rush to immediately disclose all the commission’s government or church records. Names can eventually be redacted from government documents and the testimony from survivors will speak for itself.“Repeatedly, people say the most compelling part of all was hearing first-hand from survivors,” Wilson said. “We’ve got 7,000 statements. There is plenty there to satisfy the appetite of people just beginning to learn about all this.”Grand Chief Sheila North Wilson, who represents northern Manitoba First Nations, said centre is an important part of the journey toward healing. But it will take time and care must be taken not to revictimize survivors.“There is healing in looking at atrocities right in the face and then moving past it,” said North Wilson, whose mother went to a residential school. “I hope that this will help a lot of people heal.”last_img read more

Proposed airline for Nunavut wont get off the ground after all

by ,

first_imgKent Driscoll APTN National NewsThere’s been a lot of news of a startup discount airline in Nunavut in recent weeks.It was supposed to challenge the high-priced Nunavut airline establishment.But on Friday Go Sarvaq announced it will not be flying.last_img

College JeandeBrébeuf in Montreal holds its own reconciliation week

by ,

first_imgDanielle Rochette APTN National NewsA college in Montreal is taking a step towards reconciliation.College Jean-de-Brébeuf is bringing Indigenous and non-Indigenous students together through cultural activities all week.drochette@aptn.calast_img

Minister Bennett reviewing complaints made against corrupt band council in British Columbia

by ,

first_imgKenneth JacksonAPTN National NewsIndigenous Affairs minister Carolyn Bennett has told APTN National News she is reviewing allegations of corruption on Peters First Nation that elders say is extinguishing their family lines.Elders wrote Bennett last month pleading with her to step in to help solve their membership issues.“Our family lines are being extinguished,” wrote Ed Peters, 74, the oldest surviving member of Peters reserve about two hours east of Vancouver.The “vehicle” for that extinguishment is Section 10 of the Indian Act, Ed Peters wrote, along with fellow elders Robert and Dorothy Peters.Ed Peters with a picture of his late mother Minnie Peters in the background.Section 10 came into effect in 1987 under Bill C-31 allowing bands to control their membership as long as the minister signed off on a membership code. After doing so the government would still grant status but not membership.Just over 230 bands were given the special status 30 years ago and it was developed to deal with the influx of applicants resulting from Bill C-31 that gave women their status back after losing it for marrying a non-status person. It also gave status to their children.“There is going to be a lot of complexity but I’d love to know more about Peters First Nation,” said Bennett “I know (Section 10) is problematic and I want to know more.”Bennett received two letters last month from members of Peters band – one from the elders and another from Samantha Peters, 41. They have not received a response.APTN provided paper copies of the letters during an interview with Bennett who said she will be reviewing them.“I’ll read them and then we’ll find out,” said Bennett referring to what steps she may be able to take.An APTN investigation has uncovered that once Peters got control of its own membership, it limited the number of people allowed to be members – despite people appearing to qualify under the membership code, which has kept the number of eligible voters low, as well.There are 165 status Indians registered to the band but only 42 can cast a ballot in elections. As Peters is basically one big family, some members there say one side has had control ever since 1987.“The Voters Lists used by this Band are corrupt,” wrote Robert Peters, whose son, Guy Peters, 51, has been denied membership several times despite the membership code stating the ‘natural child’ of a member can be a member as well. Guy Peters is currently in Federal Court hoping a judicial review of his latest denied application will be overturned.But all agree it’s creating a costly and lengthy legal battle few there can afford.“This must end now,” wrote Samantha Peters to Bennett on Feb. 17. “We refuse to bear the brunt of costs, via litigation, of subject matter that is not any fault of our own.”Samantha has been fighting the issue for several years now. It was a promise she made to her dying mother, Roberta Peters, in 2010. Before Roberta died she made Samantha promise to the fix the membership.Samantha Peters, left, with her late mother Roberta Peters in this undated photo supplied by the family.It was a fight Roberta has passed on from her mother, Minnie Peters.Minnie wrote Brian Mulroney’s former Progressive Conservative government in 1990 pleading with the Indian Affairs minister at the time to step in. Her letter was also shared with Bennett.“I am writing to you as my last resort,” she wrote the former Indian Affairs minister Pierre Cadieux on Jan. 4, 1990, less than three years after Peters became a Section 10 band. “Bill C-31 has unfortunately provided the opportunity through Section 10 for what is a virtual dictatorship to become a legal and permanent entity.”She went on to say, “the chief is accountable to no one and can maintain his power through intimidation, the control of information and the manipulation of resources.”In her letter, Minnie Peters outlined how the chief was then able to quickly put a stranglehold on the reserve, alleging he didn’t hold council meetings, gave his daughter membership even though she had married a “non-Indian” years before C-31, while refusing to accept other C-31 applicants, including elders who wanted to return home, and his son had a new home while other members lived in derelict housing.Samantha kept her promise to her mom by submitting more than 66 applications for people who have status through Peters but are not members, including Ed Peters’ two children – he’s the elder but his children were not members.None were approved, including an elder who wanted to return home before she died.There are nine people with applications currently open, but only a handful have received a response from the band council after filing them in October. Their applications were put off until the latest election on Jan. 19, which the members have appealed to Indigenous Affairs asking the government to overturn it over alleged manipulation of the membership list.As that is being reviewed by INAC, they are asking Bennett to launch her own investigation into Peters.“Now, it has gone too far, for too long, and we beg your intervention to remedy the alleged transgressions,” wrote Samantha Peters.kjackson@aptn.calast_img read more

Closing arguments in murder trial for man accused of killing Tina Fontaine

by ,

first_imgThe Canadian PressWINNIPEG – Lawyers are expected to make their final pitches Tuesday in the case of a man accused of killing an Indigenous teenage girl and wrapping her body in a duvet cover before dumping her in Winnipeg’s Red River.Jurors are to hear final arguments at the trial of Raymond Cormier, 56, who has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder in the August 2014 slaying of 15-year-old Tina Fontaine. Her death reignited calls for a national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women.The jury has already heard that Tina was raised by her great-aunt on the Sagkeeng First Nation, 120 kilometres north of Winnipeg, but went to the city to visit her mother. It was there that the girl became an exploited youth.Court was told there were no witnesses to Tina’s death and no DNA linking her to the accused. Experts testified they don’t know how she died.Crown prosecutors said the teen was killed and dumped in the river by Cormier, who had sex with her and found out she was a minor.The Crown presented audio recordings from a six-month undercover investigation in 2015 during which police bugged Cormier’s apartment.Audio recordings captured him, often mumbling and stuttering, telling multiple people he was attracted to Tina and had sex with her.In one recording, Cormier was heard telling a woman that he would make a bet that Tina was killed because “I found out she was 15 years old.”In another, Cormier was heard arguing with a woman and saying that there was a little girl in a “grave someplace screaming at the top of her lungs for me to finish the job. And guess what? I finished the job.”In conversations with an undercover officer who moved onto the same floor where Cormier lived, the accused said there were “three rules to crime: deny, deny deny.”The defence, which closed its case without presenting any evidence, told court the recordings could have been misheard and the transcripts could have errors.It’s expected jurors will begin deliberating on Wednesday after instructions from Court of Queen’s Bench Chief Justice Glenn Joyal.last_img read more

Working women bearing more of the breadwinning burden 2016 census shows

by ,

first_imgTORONTO – Men and women are each making comparable contributions to the family finances in nearly one-third of all couples, Statistics Canada said Wednesday as the latest data from the 2016 census revealed new details about how — and which — Canadians are paying the bills.Of the 8.2 million married or common-law couples in the country last year, 96 per cent of them saw both members earn at least some income in 2015, the most recent year for which data was available, the agency reported.And in 32 per cent of cases, both incomes were “fairly equal,” or within 40 to 60 per cent of each other — a marked improvement over 1985, when only 20.6 per cent of couples were each making comparable salaries.“Many factors have contributed to this advance, led by the increased labour force participation of women,” Statistics Canada said in a brief on the new data. “Combined with a narrowing of the gender wage gap, women now contribute a larger portion of the couple’s combined income.”Men, however, continue to earn an appreciably higher income in fully half of all opposite-sex couples, while women earned the larger share in just 17.3 per cent of cases — a glaring difference, although significantly better than in 1985, when nearly three-quarters of the men made more, compared with just eight per cent of the women.The gender gap persists in same-sex couples, too: male couples earned a median income of $100,707 in 2015, compared with $92,857 for female couples.As she embarks on a career in law, a profession long dominated by men, Jennifer Chan said she expects to work longer than many of her male colleagues, citing student debt, the gender wage gap and potential family obligations, if she decides to have children.Two years after graduating, much of Chan’s Legal Aid salary goes towards paying down her student loans instead of building savings. She’s proud to say she’s knocked $30,000 off her outstanding balance “on a completely average salary.”Chan, 27, said she could have pursued a higher-paying corporate job, but at the expense of career satisfaction and work-life balance. Still, the decision will affect her financial goals, she admitted.“I work at Legal Aid; it’s not like I’m going to make millions of dollars here,” she said, describing the double whammy of lower pay and heavier debt load that can hit new female graduates especially hard.It will likely mean holding off on buying a home right away – the Toronto housing market is especially expensive, she conceded – as well as putting on hold her plans to max out her RRSP and tax-free savings account.“It’s prolonging some of the other financial goals that I have … but ultimately it was a choice that I made.”Women in the workforce, especially in professions long dominated by men, will likely earn less over their career and work later in life to achieve a comparable level of pension and retirement savings, said Nora Spinks of the Ottawa-based Vanier Institute of the Family.Women, Spinks said, tend to be slightly younger than their male partners, are paid less and often choose to leave temporarily in order to have and raise children. Those who get divorced later in life often suffer an especially heavy financial blow.“The women who are now in their 60s were part of the cohort that lost time in pension-building when their kids were little, because they often had a year or two without benefits and the like,” said Spinks, noting women simply have to work longer to support themselves.What’s more, she added, women aren’t guaranteed more security or spending power just because they’re generating more income.“Those women who are in the paid labour force and maybe earning, finally, $100,000 — are they supporting their mothers in another household? Are they sending money back to the Philippines? Are they providing funds for their grandchildren’s childcare? Have they just given their kids a massive down payment for their own Toronto home?”As more women join the workforce, census data released earlier this year showed a comparable increase in the number of men choosing to be stay-at-home dads — evidence of shifting societal norms, Spinks added.She cited outdated Hollywood stereotypes in movies like “Three Men and a Baby” and “Mr. Mom,” which “showed men as incompetent. Incapable. Klutzes. Not any more.”“The image of the stay-at-home dad is no longer one of failure or an idiot, but rather one really dedicated to family and being there for his family.”There’s a wrinkle, however: any growth in men swapping roles with women likely has more to do with the last major economic downturn and a loss of manufacturing jobs than with any great strides forward in pay equity or gender parity.“It’s not that she’s gone up significantly,” she said. “It’s that he’s gone down.”Making sure women have supports at home to pursue career goals is also key.Family doctor Ritika Goel, also a new mom, said she’s hyper-aware of how often family obligations and work obligations clash for women.Goel, 33, works in a community health centre that supported her desire to take a year of maternity leave, but has several physician friends in male-dominated specialty fields that actively discourage taking time off.“I chose to take a year off and I’m happy I did that for my life and my bonding with my child,” she said. “At the same time, those are things that impact your career prospects.”last_img read more

Energy and materials boost Toronto market US stocks surge higher

by ,

first_imgCanada’s main stock index saw mild gains Monday while U.S. markets surged higher as worries of a trade war with China eased.The rebound came after Chinese officials signalled some flexibility on policies including foreign investment in China and South Korea reached a new deal on steel with the U.S., said Craig Fehr, Canadian markets strategist at Edward Jones in St. Louis.“If we look at the equity markets at large, I would say this is the collective deep breath of investors today, after the big sell-off last week predicated on the rising fears that a trade war could be breaking out.”The S&P/TSX composite index closed up 74.82 points at 15,298.56, boosted by metals and energy stocks.In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average closed up 669.40 points to 24,202.60 for its largest one-day gain since August 2015, regaining almost half what it had given up last week. The S&P 500 index ended up 70.29 points to 2,658.55 and the Nasdaq composite index was up 227.87 points to 7,220.54.U.S. President Donald Trump sparked trade fears last week after imposing tariffs on some US$60 billion worth of Chinese imports as well as investment restrictions, adding to trade tension on the steel and aluminum tariffs he moved to impose earlier in the month.China has promised to defend its interests, raising fears of rising protectionism on both sides, but recent signs of concessions on both sides is easing concerns, said Fehr.“Given the signs we’re getting that there’s perhaps some concession to be made related to some of the tariffs that have been announced, I think the markets are finding some solace in that and we’re getting a bit of a relief rally after last week’s declines.”Canada didn’t see the same gains Monday as U.S. stocks because it hadn’t been hit as hard, he said.“The domestic market didn’t see the declines last week like we saw in the S&P 500 and the Dow. The TSX is also being held back a little bit today by the weakness in oil prices.”The Canadian dollar closed at 77.60, down 0.18 of a US cent, also held back by oil prices, said Fehr, but still up from recent lows after higher-than-expected inflation data last week.The May crude contract closed down 33 cents to US$65.55 per barrel and the May natural gas contract was up two cents to US$2.66 per mmBTU.The April gold contract closed up US$5.10 to US$1,355.00 an ounce and the May copper contract was down two cents to US$2.97 a pound.The rise in gold prices made it one of the biggest sector gains on the TSX. Kinross Gold Corp. climbed 4.03 per cent after the metal’s price gains, as well as after settling with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission over civil charges that it failed to ensure its payments in Africa were not being used to bribe government officials.last_img read more

Wisconsin ginseng growers seek new customers amid trade war

by ,

first_imgWAUSAU, Wis. – Wisconsin ginseng growers are seeking new customers as tariffs in an escalating trade war with China will raise the price by 15 per cent for Chinese consumers.Harvests will begin in the fall but export declines will take a while to measure, the Wausau Daily Herald reported.Wisconsin grows more than 98 per cent of all U.S. ginseng, said Bill Kaldunski, president of the Ginseng Board of Wisconsin. Ginseng exports are an $8-million-per-year industry.The ginseng industry in central Wisconsin is braced for a large impact, said Kaldunski. China is one of the largest consumers of American ginseng.Tariffs went into effect at a time when the industry isn’t making a lot of sales. Most of the ginseng meant to head overseas had already been shipped.“But we’re hearing more now, and buyers are being more aggressive,” Kaldunski said.Ginseng is most commonly taken in tea and is also used as a spice in food. Ginseng products such as beer, extract pills and herbal energy drinks could help growers and distributors like the Wausau-based Hsu Enterprise find new customers in the U.S.“The stereotypical American consumer is not super familiar with ginseng, but probably knows it might be good for them,” said Will Hsu of Hsu Enterprises. “But because they didn’t grow up with the product … they don’t know the benefits.”Hsu said those products are aimed toward people “seeking lifestyle or health changes.”___Information from: Wausau Daily Herald Media, http://www.wausaudailyherald.comlast_img read more

Liberals pass Canada Post back to work bill

by ,

first_imgLegislation ordering postal workers back to work was passed in the House of Commons during a special session that dragged on into the wee hours of Saturday morning.Bill C-89 passed third reading by a vote of 166 to 43.The Senate is now set to sit Saturday and, if necessary, Sunday, to deal with the bill, which would go into effect at noon eastern time on the day following royal assent.The legislative push came as Ottawa, as well as smaller towns in Ontario, B.C., and Quebec became the latest targets of rotating strikes by the Canadian Union of Postal Workers.Despite the rush to pass the legislation, Labour Minister Patty Hajdu encouraged Canada Post and CUPW to remain at the bargaining table.“They can still pull a deal off,” she said.That said, Hajdu added: “Obviously, we would prefer that the parties are able to negotiate an agreement together, but the time has come that we need to be prepared to take action if they cannot.”Hajdu referred to mail delivery as an “essential service” and said small businesses that rely on the postal service to deliver their goods over the busy Christmas season could go bankrupt if the situation isn’t remedied quickly.“And when I say small, I mean really small. I mean people that, you know, sell marmalade or handmade goods, that this is the most profitable time of their year and if they are unable to make their earnings this time of year, they very well might be facing the end of their business.”Labour leaders and New Democrat MPs slammed the government for undermining the collective-bargaining process. The government has removed all incentive for Canada Post to reach a negotiated settlement now that the agency knows workers will be ordered back to work by early next week, they charged.“The right to strike is an integral part of the collective bargaining process,” said Canadian Labour Congress president Hassan Yussuff. “Without it, an employer has no incentive to bargain in good faith, and workers have no recourse to demand a fair process.”Canada Post seems to have convinced Prime Minister Justin Trudeau that Christmas wouldn’t come without a back-to-work bill, added CUPW president Mike Palecek.“The mail was moving, and people know it,” he said. “People have been getting their mail and online orders delivered. That was the point of our rotating-strike tactics, not to pick a fight with the public.”NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh accused the Liberals of hypocrisy, professing to believe in the right to collective bargaining while bringing in what he called the “worst, most draconian” back-to-work legislation.“They’ve shown their true face … that this government is not a friend of working people,” Singh said.New Democrat MPs voted against the motion to speed up debate on the back-to-work legislation, with many making an elaborate show of walking out of the Commons after voting, raising their fists in salute to postal workers watching from the public gallery. The votes of those who walked out were not counted.Six New Democrats remained in the chamber – representative of the small number the party maintained would get a chance to speak during the subsequent expedited debate on the bill.CUPW maintains the bill is unconstitutional and is threatening to challenge it in court.The union won a court challenge against back-to-work legislation imposed on postal workers in 2011 by the previous Conservative government. The court ruled in 2016 that by removing workers’ right to strike, the bill violated their right to freedom of association and expression.Hajdu argued that her bill is “dramatically different” from the “heavy-handed” approach taken by the Harper government and takes into account the concerns of both the union and Canada Post.But two independent senators, Frances Lankin and Diane Griffin, wrote Hajdu to express their concern that the bill may not be constitutional. The pair said Hajdu had promised to issue a government analysis detailing how the bill does not violate the Charter of Rights and Freedoms but it still had not materialized by Friday evening.CUPW members have held rotating walkouts for a month, causing massive backlogs of unsorted mail and packages at postal depots, though Canada Post and the union dispute how big the pileup is.Canada Post says it could take weeks – even stretching into 2019 – to clear the backlog that has built up, especially at major sorting centres in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver.CUPW’s 50,000 members, in two groups, are demanding better pay for rural and suburban carriers, more job security and minimum guaranteed hours.Waseem is a letter carrier for #CanadaPost. He tells us why these striking postal workers are in MP Morneau’s Toronto constituency office. #CDNpoli @CityNews @680NEWS pic.twitter.com/bhX5GhbfQo— Tony Fera (@tonyfera1) November 23, 2018last_img read more

Husky Energy trims capital spending plan for 2019 to 34 billion

by ,

first_imgCompanies in this story: (TSX:HSE, TSX:MEG)The Canadian Press CALGARY — Husky Energy Inc. says it plans to spend approximately $3.4 billion on its capital expenditure program next year.The energy company says the total is about $300 million less than it forecast earlier this year and includes spending cuts resulting from Alberta’s mandated oil production cuts and lower global oil prices.The Alberta government has ordered production cuts in the oilpatch next year in a bid to boost oil prices.Husky says spending is being cut in areas where it has the most capital flexibility, including heavy oil and Western Canada resource plays.Average annual 2019 production is expected to be approximately 300,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day, not including any production associated with its proposed acquisition of MEG Energy Corp.Husky has made a hostile takeover offer for MEG Energy.last_img read more

Cyprus banks challenging money laundering associations

by ,

first_imgNICOSIA, Cyprus — The chief of the Cyprus Association of Banks say Cypriot lenders are concerned that their adoption of some of the toughest anti-money laundering regulations in the world has not been fully recognized abroad.Association Director Michalis Kammas told The Associated Press Monday that banks are challenging “outdated perceptions” and are working to raise awareness about reform efforts.Kammas says more rigorous supervision and directives have led to the closure of a “significant number” of bank accounts since 2014.Prior to a 2013 banking sector crisis that brought Cyprus to the brink of bankruptcy, the east Mediterranean island nation, which is a member of the European Union, was hounded by allegations that it was a tax and money laundering haven.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Thieves steal 10k in GoPros from Autographics

by ,

first_imgThe thieves then loaded up a pair of duffle bags with 25 of the digital cameras, worth an estimated $10,000. Wright said that the two thieves were in and out of the store in less than a minute, and that the two were focused only on stealing the cameras, explaining that the pair ignored several pieces of stereo equipment that were sitting out in the open.According to the surveillance video, one of the suspects was wearing a dark-coloured hoodie, jeans, and dark-coloured running shoes. The other was wearing a grey hoodie, light gray sweatpants, and white Nike running shoes. It’s not known how old the suspects are or what their ethnicity is, since their faces were not caught on camera.Wright said that the two suspects likely walked in across the store’s front lawn, since the parking lot camera was not activated. It is not known if or what type of getaway vehicle the thieves used.Cpl. Madonna Saunderson with North District RCMP said that police are currently investigating the break-in, and are asking anyone with information to call the Fort St. John RCMP at (250) 787-8100, or Crime Stoppers at 1 (800) 222-8477. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — Mounties in Fort St. John are searching for two suspects who broke into Autographics Trim & Signs this week.Autographics co-owner Jason Wright said that the break-in happened at around 4:45 a.m. on Wednesday morning. According to surveillance video that the store posted on its Facebook page, two men smashed the front door to gain entry to the store, and proceeded smash a locked display case containing Go-Pro digital cameras.last_img read more