Tag Archives: 上海龙凤1314宝贝

SELECTMEN NEWS 5 Things That Happened At Mondays Meeting

by ,

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are five things that happened at Monday night’s Wilmington Board of Selectmen meeting:#1) FARMERS MARKET SEASON APPROVED: Selectmen unanimously approved the request of Wilmington Farmers Market Association President Dana Burnham to conduct the Farmers Market on Sundays, from 10am to 1pm, from June 16, 2019 through October 23, 2019, on the Swain Green.#2) BAND PARENTS’ REQUESTS APPROVED: Selectmen unanimously approved two requests from the Wilmington Band Parents Association — (1) selling coffee, donuts, popcorn, cold drinks, pompoms, and balloons during the Memorial Day Parade and (2) selling popcorn, cotton candy, hot pretzels, soda, and water during the Recreation Commission’s Summer Concert Series.#3) GIANT YARD SALE APPROVED: Selectmen unanimously approved the request of the Wilmington Sons of Italy and Wilmington Band Parents Association to use the Swain School parking lot to hold a Yard Sale fundraiser on Saturday, September 7, 2019.#4) ANNUAL FOOTBALL CAR WASH APPROVED: Selectmen unanimously approved the request of Nancy Roberts, President of the Wilmington Touchdown Club, to use the parking lot of the Fourth of July Building for the annual WHS Football Car Wash on Sunday, August 11, 2019, from 9am to noon.#5) SELECTMEN APPOINT DESIGNEE TO SERVE ON FINANCE DIRECTOR SCREENING COMMITTEE: Selectman Jonathan Eaton was unanimously appointed to serve as the board’s designee on the Finance Director/Town Accountant Screening Committee. The position was posted earlier this week.BUT WAIT, THERE’S MORE: Articles on the Town Economic Development Committee; the Town Meeting Review Committee; the 2019 Town Meeting Warrant; and Unaccepted Ways are forthcoming.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSELECTMEN NOTEBOOK: 10 Things That Happened At Last Week’s MeetingIn “Government”SELECTMEN NOTEBOOK: 6 MORE Things That Happened At This Month’s Selectmen’s MeetingIn “Government”SELECTMEN NOTEBOOK: 5 Things That Happened At Last Week’s Selectmen’s MeetingIn “Government”last_img read more

Vodafone to Launch PanIndia Mobile Number Portability on 3 July

by ,

first_imgVodafone India, one of the country’s leading telecommunications service providers, on Thursday announced the launch of National Mobile Number Portability (NMNP), aligning with the government’s mandate to roll out pan-India Mobile Number Portability services from 3 July, 2015.The National Mobile Number Portability service facilitates customers to carry their existing mobile number from one telecom circle to another across India and choose the operator of their choice. NMNP is applicable to all pre-paid and post-paid customers.”Customers will be the biggest gainers of the National MNP service as it allows them to carry their existing number across India and also choose the operator of their choice. Vodafone has benefited from the intra-circle MNP that was rolled out in 2011 and we look forward to a similar response this time,” said Vodafone India Chief Commercial Officer Vivek Mathur.Customers looking for the convenience of retaining their existing number at the new location can avail the benefits of National MNP service.Vodafone India has a pan India base of over 184 million customers serviced through a network of over 130,000 sites, of which over 35,000 are 3G sites.This makes Vodafone India, the fifth largest network in the world. Vodafone also has the largest retail footprint with over 9,800 exclusive retail stores across India.last_img read more

A peek into the merging galaxy cluster Abell 3888

by ,

first_img(Phys.org)—Studying substructures of galaxy clusters can reveal important information about the morphology and evolution processes of these gravity-bound groups of galaxies. Optical spectroscopy is very helpful in this matter, capable of unraveling the history of large-scale structure formation in the universe. That’s why a team of astronomers from New Zealand conducted a series of spectroscopic observations to peek into the galaxy cluster Abell 3888, unveiling that this cluster is dynamically young and might be an indicator of an ongoing or past merger event. A paper detailing the findings was published online on Feb. 11 on the arXiv pre-print server. In galaxy clustering, mass may not be the only thing that matters Citation: A peek into the merging galaxy cluster Abell 3888 (2016, February 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-02-peek-merging-galaxy-cluster-abell.html Explore further © 2016 Phys.org More information: An Optical Analysis of the Merging Cluster Abell 3888, arXiv:1602.03756 [astro-ph.CO] arxiv.org/abs/1602.03756AbstractIn this paper we present new AAOmega spectroscopy of 254 galaxies within a 30′ radius around Abell 3888. We combine these data with the existing redshifts measured in a one degree radius around the cluster and performed a substructure analysis. We confirm 71 member galaxies within the core of A3888 and determine a new average redshift and velocity dispersion for the cluster of 0.1535 +- 0.0009 and 1181 +- 197 km/s, respectively. The cluster is elongated along an East-West axis and we find the core is bimodal along this axis with two sub-groups of 26 and 41 members detected. Our results suggest that A3888 is a merging system putting to rest the previous conjecture about the morphological status of the cluster derived from X-ray observations. In addition to the results on A3888 we also present six newly detected galaxy over-densities in the field, three of which we classify as new galaxy clusters. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The team, led by Associate Professor Melanie Johnston-Hollitt of the Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, has used the AAOmega spectrograph installed on the 3.9-meter Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) situated at the Siding Spring Observatory in Australia. Thanks to the spectrograph’s 400 fibres covering a two-degree field when projected on sky, it is an excellent instrument for examining the optical substructure in nearby southern clusters.The researchers carried out their observations in May 2013. They were initially targeting nearly 800 galaxies up to 30′ radius from the centre of the cluster. In result, the team detected 254 new redshifts in this region and in combination with previous findings, they determined that Abell 3888, as the main structure, has 71 member galaxies. Importantly, the astronomers were able to identify substructures in the field that were very helpful in unraveling the merging nature of this galaxy cluster.”The combination of pieces of evidence from the optical analysis, the elongated optical galaxy distribution, and our substructure test which showed that Abell 3888 is bimodal strongly suggests that this cluster has had dynamical interactions and is highly likely to be a young cluster in an active merging state,” the paper reads.Galaxies and galaxy groups come together and merge to form larger units such as galaxy clusters. Cluster merging is believed to be a key parameter in formation and evolution of galaxy clusters. The process is very common and has a significant impact on cluster characteristics such as velocity dispersion, temperature and mass. It often generates clumps of galaxies within the cluster volume. This change in galaxy volumetric density is known as “substructure.””Substructures may be formed through the infall of individual galaxies or galaxy groups into a relaxed cluster or during the merging of two or more entire galaxy clusters,” the researchers wrote in the paper.Currently, the most robust method to detect merging is the combination of the optical and X-ray substructure analyses of clusters. Therefore, Shakouri and her colleagues underline that results from spectroscopic observations of Abell 3888 are consistent with previous findings from the X-ray studies focused on unveiling morphology of galaxy clusters.In addition, the team also detected six galaxy over-densities in the field. Three of them were classified as new galaxy clusters.The researchers concluded that further spectroscopic analysis of Abell 3888 would be useful to further probe its dynamics. They also stressed the need for single slit spectroscopy or more usefully observations with an integral field unit are required to increase the spectroscopic coverage in the cluster core. “This would allow a more detailed probe of the cluster core and better statistics on the merging populations,” the scientists noted. 10 arcmin x 10 arcmin field showing luminosity (top) and temperature (bottom) maps of Abell 3888 before (left) and after (right) point source removal. The color scale in the luminosity map is set so that white corresponds to the maximum cluster flux. The point source is 100 times brighter than this level. The scale in the temperature map ranges from 2 to 10 keV. Credit: Andersson, K. et al., 2009.last_img read more

Physicists discover an infinite number of quantum speed limits

by ,

first_img More information: Diego Paiva Pires et al. “Generalized Geometric Quantum Speed Limits.” Physical Review X. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevX.6.021031 Illustration of geometric quantum speed limits. The ultimate speed limit arises from the length of the shortest geodesic path between two states, which here is the solid red line. This distance corresponds to the minimum time needed for a system to evolve from one state to another. Credit: Diego Paiva Pires et al. ©2016 American Physical Society Journal information: Physical Review X This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Physicists quantify the usefulness of ‘quantum weirdness’ Citation: Physicists discover an infinite number of quantum speed limits (2016, June 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-06-physicists-infinite-quantum-limits.htmlcenter_img Although physicists have been investigating different quantum speed limits for different types of quantum systems, it has not been clear what the best way to do this is, or how many different quantum speed limits there are.Now in a new paper published in Physical Review X, Diego Paiva Pires et al., from the UK and Brazil, have used techniques from information geometry to show that there are an infinite number of quantum speed limits. They also develop a way to determine which of these speed limits are the strictest, or in other words, which speed limits offer the tightest lower bounds. As the researchers explain, the search for the ultimate quantum speed limits is closely related to the very nature of time itself. “In recent years, there has been an intense theoretical and experimental research activity to understand, on one hand, a fundamental concept in quantum mechanics such as time, and to devise, on the other hand, efficient schemes for the implementation of quantum technologies,” coauthor Gerardo Adesso, at the University of Nottingham, told Phys.org. “A basic question that combines and underpins both areas of research is: ‘How fast can a quantum system evolve in time?’ Establishing general and tight quantum speed limits is crucial to assess how fast quantum technologies can ultimately be, and can accordingly guide in the design of more efficient protocols operating at or close to the ultimate bounds.” In order to determine how fast a quantum system can evolve from one state to another, it’s necessary to be able to distinguish between the two states, and there are multiple ways to do this. In the new study, the physicists used a general method based on information geometry. From a geometric perspective, two distinguishable states can be represented by two points on the surface of some shape, such as a sphere or other manifold. Previous research has shown that there are an infinite number of corresponding metrics that can be used to measure the distinguishability of two quantum states.In the new study, the physicists have shown that each of these metrics corresponds to a different quantum speed limit. The “strictest” quantum speed limit is determined by the metric that gives the shortest distance (also known as a ‘geodesic’) between the two points, or states, as measured along the manifold’s curved surface. “A different quantum speed limit arises from each of these metrics in such a way that the tightest bound for a given dynamics is specified by the metric whose geodesic is best tailored to the given dynamical path,” explained coauthor Marco Cianciaruso, also at Nottingham.Overall, the new approach unifies most of the previous results by interpreting them under a single, new framework. On one hand, the researchers could derive the tightest bounds to date on quantum speed limits for some relevant instances, such as quantum bits undergoing dissipative and decohering evolutions. On the other hand, they could also show that bounds that have been previously proposed for other instances are truly the optimal bounds—no tighter bounds will ever be found. In the future, the researchers plan to experimentally investigate the quantum speed limits derived here using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. “Our findings are expected to have an impact on the fields of quantum information, computation, simulation, and metrology,” said Diogo Soares-Pinto at the Sao Carlos Institute of Physics, who supervised the project. (Phys.org)—In order to determine how fast quantum technologies can ultimately operate, physicists have established the concept of “quantum speed limits.” Quantum speed limits impose limitations on how fast a quantum system can transition from one state to another, so that such a transition requires a minimum amount of time (typically on the order of nanoseconds). This means, for example, that a future quantum computer will not be able to perform computations faster than a certain time determined by these limits. © 2016 Phys.org Explore furtherlast_img read more